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Article ID: 11762

Study shows that Pediatricians Play Crucial Role in Violence Prevention

Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center

Researchers at Wake Forest University Baptist Medical Center say physicians and other health care providers play valuable roles in violence prevention in their communities.

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31-Mar-1999 12:00 AM EST
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Article ID: 11760

Researchers Develop 'Trojan Horse' to Deliver Anticancer Drugs

University of Utah

University of Utah chemists have developed a potential new weapon in the fight against cancer using a "Trojan Horse" to deliver drugs.

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31-Mar-1999 12:00 AM EST
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Article ID: 11759

Alcoholics' Children: Living With A Stacked Biochemical Deck

Johns Hopkins Medicine

Children of alcoholics have an altered brain chemistry that appears to make them more likely to become alcoholics themselves, according to a recent study by Johns Hopkins scientists.

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31-Mar-1999 12:00 AM EST
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Article ID: 11754

UV radiation in sunlight induces vitamin A deficiency in human skin

University of Michigan

U-M scientists report in Nature Medicine that UV irradiation blocks the ability of skin cells to recognize and respond to retinoic acid.

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30-Mar-1999 12:00 AM EST
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Article ID: 11752

Higher Levels of Protein May Predict Heart Disease

Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center

A syndrome that scientists call the "metabolic syndrome" and that the media often term "Syndrome X" may be associated with a low-level inflammatory reaction that predicts cardiovascular disease, a Wake Forest University scientist reported at an American Heart Association meeting in Orlando.

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30-Mar-1999 12:00 AM EST
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    30-Mar-1999 12:00 AM EST

Article ID: 11733

New Way To Immunize Against Deadly Bacterium

Medical College of Wisconsin

Researchers Find New Way To Immunize Against Deadly Bacterium

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30-Mar-1999 12:00 AM EST
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    30-Mar-1999 12:00 AM EST

Article ID: 11722

Genetic Research Boosts Understanding of Iron's Path through Body, Diseases of Iron Metabolism

Harvard Medical School

Harvard Medical School/Howard Hughes Medical Institute researchers have found that the transferrin cycle has a more limited role in iron transport than previously believed. The findings may lead to improved diagnosis and treatment of iron metabolism disorders.

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30-Mar-1999 12:00 AM EST
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    30-Mar-1999 12:00 AM EST

Article ID: 11691

New cell isolation method will aid in studying tumor development

UT Southwestern Medical Center

Investigators at UT Southwestern Medical Center at Dallas have developed a new way to isolate purified cancer cells - an important advance that will help unravel the mysteries of tumor biology and cancer development.

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30-Mar-1999 12:00 AM EST
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    30-Mar-1999 12:00 AM EST

Article ID: 11676

New Gene May Play Important Role in Regulating HDL, the "Good" Cholesterol

Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania

Scientists have identified a new human gene that may figure prominently in the regulation of cholesterol levels in the body. When the gene was experimentally overexpressed in mice, levels of HDL cholesterol - the "good" cholesterol - dropped to nearly undetectable levels, a condition associated with high cardiovascular disease risk in humans.

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30-Mar-1999 12:00 AM EST
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    30-Mar-1999 12:00 AM EST

Article ID: 11668

Novel Anticancer Treatment Can Slow Growth of Tumor Cells

Dana-Farber Cancer Institute

In a study that points the way to a new form of cancer therapy, researchers at Dana-Farber Cancer Institute and Harvard Medical School report that a drug commonly used to treat diabetes has caused tumor cells to shift to a slower-growing, less-menacing state in patients with a rare type of cancer.

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30-Mar-1999 12:00 AM EST
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