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  • Embargo expired:
    14-Nov-2002 4:00 PM EST

Article ID: 32706

Obese Women Have Thicker Carotid Artery Walls, Higher Stroke Risk

American Heart Association (AHA)

Obesity in middle-aged women is independently associated with premature thickening of the carotid arteries, a sign of impending heart disease, researchers report in today's rapid access issue of Stroke: Journal of the American Heart Association.

Released:
15-Nov-2002 12:00 AM EST
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  • Embargo expired:
    7-Nov-2002 4:00 PM EST

Article ID: 32618

Young Blacks, Hispanics More Prone to Stroke than Young Whites

American Heart Association (AHA)

The incidence of stroke is higher among blacks and Hispanics ages 20 to 44 than among young whites, according to a study.

Released:
8-Nov-2002 12:00 AM EST
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  • Embargo expired:
    4-Nov-2002 4:00 PM EST

Article ID: 32490

Lifetime Risk for Heart Failure: One in Five

American Heart Association (AHA)

A person age 40 or older has a one-in-five chance of developing congestive heart failure, according to a study.

Released:
5-Nov-2002 12:00 AM EST
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  • Embargo expired:
    31-Oct-2002 4:00 PM EST

Article ID: 32443

Inflammation May Increase Stroke Risk in Men with Hypertension

American Heart Association (AHA)

Proteins associated with inflammation may help identify different levels of stroke risk in men who have hypertension, Swedish researchers report.

Released:
1-Nov-2002 12:00 AM EST
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  • Embargo expired:
    31-Oct-2002 4:00 PM EST

Article ID: 32444

Keen ER Identification Could Avert Future Strokes

American Heart Association (AHA)

Each trip to the emergency room could be a chance to squash a future stroke. Irregular heart rhythms that make people more vulnerable to stroke are often diagnosed in the ER, and a substantial number of high-risk patients can be identified there, according to a study.

Released:
1-Nov-2002 12:00 AM EST
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  • Embargo expired:
    28-Oct-2002 4:00 PM EST

Article ID: 32398

Life-Saving Properties of Beta Blockers Extend to More Patients

American Heart Association (AHA)

Beta blocker drugs have now been shown to lengthen the lives of people at risk of sudden death due to irregular heart beats, according to a study published in today's rapid access issue of Circulation: Journal of the American Heart Association.

Released:
29-Oct-2002 12:00 AM EST
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Article ID: 32397

Calcium-Blocker Drug Slows Artery Clogging Better than Beta Blocker

American Heart Association (AHA)

High blood pressure treatment with a calcium channel antagonist slowed progression of atherosclerosis, the disease process responsible for heart attacks and strokes, better than a beta blocker, according to a rapid track report posted online this week in Circulation: Journal of the American Heart Association.

Released:
25-Oct-2002 12:00 AM EDT
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  • Embargo expired:
    24-Oct-2002 4:00 PM EDT

Article ID: 32310

Analysis Finds Drug Improves Odds of Complete Stroke Recovery

American Heart Association (AHA)

A drug that protects the brain from injury during ischemic stroke can significantly increase the chance of complete recovery, researchers report in a meta-analysis.

Released:
25-Oct-2002 12:00 AM EDT
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  • Embargo expired:
    24-Oct-2002 4:00 PM EDT

Article ID: 32311

Giving Clot Busters in Arteries Has Some Benefits

American Heart Association (AHA)

Injecting clot-busting drugs into an artery after stroke nearly doubled the rate of favorable outcomes and nearly halved the number of deaths compared to people who didn't get the drugs. However, it also increased the risk of bleeding, researchers report.

Released:
25-Oct-2002 12:00 AM EDT
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Article ID: 32305

How You Respond to High-Fat Diet Is Linked to Genes

American Heart Association (AHA)

Maybe people who eat fatty foods without negative health consequences really haven't sold their souls to the devil. They may just have good genes. The link between dietary fat intake and heart disease is hardwired into our genes, according to research.

Released:
23-Oct-2002 12:00 AM EDT
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