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  • Nissan is one automotive company investing in the development of fuel cell powered vehicles. Pictured here is a prototype that Nissan says is
    Nissan Motor Corporation / press handout for editorial use only
    Nissan is one automotive company investing in the development of fuel cell powered vehicles. Pictured here is a prototype that Nissan says is "the world’s first Solid Oxide Fuel-Cell (SOFC)-powered prototype vehicle that runs on bio-ethanol electric power." Credit:
  • A new catalyst to turbocharge the processing of oxygen in fuel cells: Regents' Professor Meilin Liu (left) with postdoctoral research associate Yu Chen in Liu's Georgia Tech lab as they display a disc coated with the catalyst, which works in two phases. The new material also preserves cathodes in solid oxide fuel cells.
    Georgia Tech / Christopher Moore
    A new catalyst to turbocharge the processing of oxygen in fuel cells: Regents' Professor Meilin Liu (left) with postdoctoral research associate Yu Chen in Liu's Georgia Tech lab as they display a disc coated with the catalyst, which works in two phases. The new material also preserves cathodes in solid oxide fuel cells.
  • A new boost to fuel cell technology from Georgia Tech: A nanoparticle coating on this disc turbocharges the processing of oxygen on the cathode end of solid oxide fuel cells, increasing eightfold current best performance.
    Georgia Tech / Christopher Moore
    A new boost to fuel cell technology from Georgia Tech: A nanoparticle coating on this disc turbocharges the processing of oxygen on the cathode end of solid oxide fuel cells, increasing eightfold current best performance.
  • The new Georgia Tech fuel cell catalyst, a coating only about two dozen nanometers thick, works in two phases. First, the nanoparticles on top grab molecular oxygen from the air and make it very easy and tear apart into single oxygen ions. Then oxygen vacancies in the nanoparticle rapidly pass the oxygen ions to the second phase, a layer full of oxygen vacancies which shuttle the ions to their meeting with ionic hydrogen to complete the chemical process that powers fuel cells.
    Georgia Tech / Liu / Chen
    The new Georgia Tech fuel cell catalyst, a coating only about two dozen nanometers thick, works in two phases. First, the nanoparticles on top grab molecular oxygen from the air and make it very easy and tear apart into single oxygen ions. Then oxygen vacancies in the nanoparticle rapidly pass the oxygen ions to the second phase, a layer full of oxygen vacancies which shuttle the ions to their meeting with ionic hydrogen to complete the chemical process that powers fuel cells.
  • A labyrinth of tubs delivers fuel, oxygen and other gases into experimental fuel cells (rear, top) in Regents' Professor Meilin Liu's lab. Liu is developing nanomaterial catalysts that turbocharge fuel cell performance in hopes of empowering the development of multiple zero-emissions renewable energy sources.
    Georgia Tech / Christopher Moore
    A labyrinth of tubs delivers fuel, oxygen and other gases into experimental fuel cells (rear, top) in Regents' Professor Meilin Liu's lab. Liu is developing nanomaterial catalysts that turbocharge fuel cell performance in hopes of empowering the development of multiple zero-emissions renewable energy sources.
  • A simple diagram depicts the basic functioning of a solid oxide fuel cell.
    Smithsonian edu / The National Museum of American History / press handout for editorial use only
    A simple diagram depicts the basic functioning of a solid oxide fuel cell.




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