Study Shows High Economic Impact of Cancer in Employees

Released: 12/7/2012 10:10 AM EST
Source Newsroom: Journal of Occupational and Environmental Medicine
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Citations Journal of Occupational and Environmental Medicine

Disability in Workers with Cancer Equals 20 Percent of Healthcare Spending

Newswise — PHILADELPHIA, PA — Each year, more than three million American workers are diagnosed with cancer, leading to high productivity losses that mainly affect smaller companies, reports a study in the December Journal of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, official publication of the American College of Occupational and Environmental Medicine (ACOEM).

Led by Grant H. Skrepnek, PhD, RPh, of The University of Arizona Cancer Center, Tucson, the researchers used a national survey of medical spending to analyze the prevalence and cost impact of cancer in working adults. Based on data from 2004 to 2008, they estimate that 3.3 million American workers are diagnosed with cancer annually.

Cancer in U.S. workers leads to productivity losses of more than 33 million disability days per year, amounting to $7.5 billion in lost productivity. Based on the average wages of the workers surveyed, disability costs due to cancer were equal to 20 percent of total healthcare expenditures.

Nearly 85 percent of the workers with cancer worked for smaller companies with fewer than 500 employees. These small-business employees had higher rates of other health problems, including high blood pressure, depression, and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. They were also more likely to be uninsured.

Certain types of cancers, including women's cancers and melanoma, were associated with higher burdens of illness. For breast cancer, health care costs and hospitalizations were twice as high and disability days 55 percent higher than for other cancers.

The study is one of the first to document the economic impact of cancer in the U.S. workforce. The true cost in terms of lost productivity is likely even higher than the disability days measured in the study. The authors call for further efforts to reduce the burden of illness associated with cancer and its treatment—perhaps including supportive care interventions to reduce cancer-related disability.

About the Author

Dr Skrepnek may be contacted for interviews at skrepnek@pharmacy.arizona.edu.

About ACOEM
ACOEM (www.acoem.org), an international society of 5,000 occupational physicians and other health care professionals, provides leadership to promote optimal health and safety of workers, workplaces, and environments.

About Journal of Occupational and Environmental Medicine
The Journal of Occupational and Environmental Medicine (www.joem.org) is the official journal of the American College of Occupational and Environmental Medicine. Edited to serve as a guide for physicians, nurses, and researchers, the clinically oriented research articles are an excellent source for new ideas, concepts, techniques, and procedures that can be readily applied in the industrial or commercial employment setting.


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