The Internet Becomes Next Nostradamus for Allergy Season

Released: 10/30/2012 12:00 PM EDT
Embargo expired: 11/9/2012 12:00 AM EST
Source Newsroom: American College of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology (ACAAI)
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Newswise — ANAHEIM, CA. (November 9, 2012) – While it’s believed that Nostradamus’ prophecies predicted many historical events, his digital successor, the Internet, may be foreseeing the height of allergy suffering. According to allergist Leonard Bielory, M.D., American College of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology (ACAAI) board member, Google search volume is shedding light on the most common allergy symptoms, when searches peak and how they pertain to pollen types.

In his research, being presented at the ACAAI Annual Scientific Meeting, Dr. Bielory found that, due to tree pollens, nasal allergy symptoms are the most common searches from March through May. Symptoms include sneezing, a runny and itchy nose, and stuffiness due to blockage or congestion.

“Allergy sufferers experience heighted allergy symptoms in the spring season, and again during September due to weed pollen and grass season,” said Dr. Bielory. “The peak week for all allergy symptom searches is the second week of May, suggesting sufferers may be experiencing both spring and summer allergy symptoms.”

Nasal allergy symptoms were also commonly searched during the fall months. The second most common symptom, based on search volume, is eye allergies.

With spring allergy season being only four short months away, the ACAAI advises sufferers to schedule an appointment with their board-certified allergist during the winter months to find relief.

“Treating symptoms early, before they appear, means less suffering,” said Dr. Bielory. “An allergist will develop a customized treatment plan to keep you living an active, healthy lifestyle.”

According to an ACAAI patient survey, board-certified allergists are successful in treating up to 90 percent of patients with seasonal allergies and 70 to 80 percent with perennial allergies.

Those who think they may be suffering from seasonal allergies can track their symptoms with MyNasalAllergyJournal.org. More news and research from the annual meeting, being held Nov. 8-13, 2012 can be followed via Twitter at #ACAAI.

About ACAAI
The ACAAI is a professional medical organization of more than 5,700 allergists-immunologists and allied health professionals, headquartered in Arlington Heights, Ill. The College fosters a culture of collaboration and congeniality in which its members work together and with others toward the common goals of patient care, education, advocacy and research. ACAAI allergists are board-certified physicians trained to diagnose allergies and asthma, administer immunotherapy, and provide patients with the best treatment outcomes. For more information and to find relief, visit www.AllergyandAsthmaRelief.org. Join us on Facebook and Twitter.

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