Survey: More Than Half of Moms Say Getting More Sleep Would Make Them Better Parents

Article ID: 524440

Released: 18-Oct-2006 2:10 PM EDT

Source Newsroom: Takeda Pharmaceuticals North America

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Newswise — A new nationwide survey released today found that 52 percent of America's moms feel that more sleep would make them better parents and 65 percent feel they would be happier. Although many factors interfere with a mom's opportunity to sleep (e.g., nighttime feedings, tending to children), even when given the chance, many are still lying awake at night. According to the survey, moms are often kept up thinking about the next day's "to-dos" (36 percent), stressing about the family's finances (25 percent), or worrying about family issues (24 percent).

In response to these findings, Debi Mazar, series regular on HBO's hit show ENTOURAGE and insomnia sufferer, along with nationally recognized sleep specialist Suzanne Griffin, M.D., FAPA, Clinical Psychiatrist, of Georgetown University Hospital, are heading up the "Sleepless Moms" campaign to help America's moms overcome their challenges with sleep and insomnia. Both working mothers, Debi Mazar and Dr. Griffin know how the stress of balancing a demanding career, family life and household responsibilities can impact sleep.

"If I don't sleep, I just can't hold it together. I find myself leaving doors unlocked or forgetting to eat, because I'm so busy taking care of everybody else. On little sleep, I also tend to lose my patience, which is very difficult as a mother of two young children," said Debi Mazar, who has struggled with insomnia for many years.

The Modern Mom Struggles to Get Those Much-Needed Zzzs

According to the survey of more than 500 moms, conducted by Braun Research, 54 percent report not getting enough sleep. Full-time working moms suffer the most (59 percent versus 48 percent of stay-at-home moms), with 50 percent getting six or fewer hours of sleep per night. Stress about home, work and parenting responsibilities often prevent moms from getting shut-eye.

"Consistently not getting enough sleep and lying awake at night worrying about day-to-day challenges could be a sign of insomnia. Insomnia occurs with inadequate or poor-quality sleep because of difficulty falling asleep, waking up frequently during the night with difficulty returning to sleep, waking up too early or unrefreshing sleep," said Dr. Griffin.

Although sleep problems are prevalent among mothers, four out of five have never spoken to their doctor and 82 percent have never considered using a prescription sleep medication. Many moms are reluctant to take sleep medications because they worry that they will become addicted (28 percent) or they want to be alert should their children need them in the middle of the night (29 percent).

"There are sleep-aid options available that can help these sleepless parents without these types of side effects," continued Dr. Griffin. "Parents who suffer from sleep problems should talk to their doctor about a treatment option that is right for them."

The "Sleepless Moms" Campaign

As part of the "Sleepless Moms" campaign, which is sponsored by Takeda Pharmaceuticals North America, Inc., Debi Mazar and Dr. Griffin are encouraging parents to speak to their healthcare provider about their sleep problems and providing "SLEEP" tips and advice on overcoming insomnia:

"¢ Stick to a sleep schedule: Go to bed and wake up at the same time each day, including weekends.

"¢ Lifestyle change: Adjust your lifestyle to avoid alcohol and foods and drinks high in caffeine late in the afternoon and before bedtime.

"¢ Establish a relaxing bedtime routine: Develop a routine that will help you wind down from your day BEFORE you get into bed (e.g., take a warm bath).

"¢ Environment is key: Create a sleep environment that is cool, quiet, dark and comfortable.

"¢ Prioritize your day: Avoid bringing work and responsibilities to bed " associate your bed with sleep and sex only.

For more information about the "Sleepless Moms" campaign, parents can visit http://www.sleeplessmoms.com. The interactive website offers a variety of educational resources about insomnia and its associated treatments, including a free e-brochure, "Sleepless Moms: An Eye-Opening Look at Shut-Eye." Written by Dr. Griffin, this brochure provides unique insight into the importance of sleep to the family dynamic and includes real-life testimonials from sleepless moms.

About the Sponsor

The "Sleepless Moms" campaign is sponsored by Takeda Pharmaceuticals North America, Inc. Based in Deerfield, Ill., Takeda Pharmaceuticals North America, Inc. is a wholly owned subsidiary of Takeda Pharmaceutical Company Limited, the largest pharmaceutical company in Japan. Takeda is committed to striving toward better health for individuals and progress in medicine by developing superior pharmaceutical products.


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