An Optimal Diet Starts with a High-Protein Breakfast

Released: 7/19/2010 4:00 PM EDT
Source Newsroom: Institute of Food Technologists (IFT)
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Citations 2010 IFT Annual Meeting and Food Expo

Newswise — A quality, high-protein diet – one that begins at breakfast – is critical for maintaining muscle mass, curbing hunger, reducing abdominal fat, and preventing and slowing the progression of age-related bone and muscle loss. These findings were presented during a panel presentation at the 2010 IFT Annual Meeting and Food Expo®.

While humans maintain the ability to build muscle at any age, the effects of insufficient protein increase substantially in older adults, often leading to muscle and bone conditions such as sarcopenia (the degenerative loss of muscle mass) and osteoporosis, said Douglas Paddon-Jones, Ph.D., associate professor, physical therapy and internal medicine, the University of Texas Medical Branch.

Protein makes up about 50 percent of bone volume and 33 percent of our body mass, said dietician and sports nutritionist Marie Spano. “Higher protein diets (optimally, between 25 and 30 grams of protein per meal) are associated with greater bone mass and fewer fractures when calcium intake is adequate.” In addition, replacing carbohydrates with protein can prevent obesity and obesity-related conditions such as Type 2 Diabetes.

The move toward a more protein rich diet could lower health costs and improve mobility and independence in older adults, said Spano.

Quality, high-protein foods include: eggs (12.5 grams of protein per egg), milk (3.3 grams per 4 ounces), and meats and fish (7 grams of protein per serving), said Craig Julius of Pierre Foods, Inc. Whey is also high in protein; soy and rice are “incomplete” sources of protein.

Presenters include:
Craig Julius –skip.julius@pierrefoods.com
Douglas Paddon-Jones – djpaddon@utmb.edu
Marie Spano – mariespano@comcast.net

About IFT
The Institute of Food Technologists (IFT) is a nonprofit scientific society. Our individual members are professionals engaged in food science, food technology, and related professions in industry, academia, and government. IFT’s mission is to advance the science of food, and our long-range vision is to ensure a safe and abundant food supply, contributing to healthier people everywhere.

For more than 70 years, the IFT has been unlocking the potential of the food science community by creating a dynamic global forum where members from more than 100 countries can share, learn, and grow. We champion the use of sound science across the food value chain through the exchange of knowledge, by providing education, and by furthering the advancement of the profession. IFT has offices in Chicago, Illinois, and Washington, D.C. For more information, please visit ift.org.


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