Researchers Create Method to Rapidly Identify Specific Strains of Illness

Released: 10-Jul-2013 12:00 PM EDT
Source Newsroom: George Washington University
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Citations Genome Research

Newswise — (Boston) - Researchers from Boston University School of Medicine (BUSM) and George Washington University (GWU) have developed a method to rapidly identify pathogenic species and strains causing illnesses, such as pneumonia, that could help lead to earlier detection of disease outbreaks and pinpoint effective treatments more quickly. The findings are featured online in the journal Genome Research.

Emerging sequencing technologies have revolutionized the collection of genomic data for bioforensics, biosurveillance and for use in clinical settings. However, new approaches are being developed to analyze these large volumes of genetic data. Principal investigator Evan Johnson, PhD, assistant professor of medicine at BUSM, and Keith Crandall, PhD, director of GW’s Computational Biology Institute, have created a statistical framework called Pathoscope to identify pathogenic genetic sequences from infected tissue samples.

This unique approach can accurately discriminate between closely related strains of the same species with little coverage of the pathogenic genome. The method also can determine the complete composition of known pathogenic and benign organisms in a biological sample. No other method can accurately identify multiple species or substrains in such a direct and automatic way. Current methods, such as the standard polymerase chain reaction detection or microscope observation, are often imperfect and time-consuming.

“Pathoscope is like completing a complex jigsaw puzzle. Instead of manually assembling the puzzle, which can take days or weeks of tedious effort, we use a statistical algorithm that can determine how the picture should look without actually putting it together,” said Johnson. “Our method can characterize a biological sample faster, more accurately and in a more automated fashion than any other approach out there.”

This work will be relevant in a broad range of scenarios. For example, in hospitals, this sequencing method will allow for rapid screening of thousands of infectious pathogens simultaneously, while being sensitive enough to monitor disease outbreaks caused by specific pathogenic strains. Veterinarians can even apply the method in their practices. This research is also applicable outside of clinical settings, allowing officials to quickly identify agents of bioterrorism (e.g. in a tainted letter) and harmful pathogens on hard surfaces, soil, water or in food products.

“This approach has the ability to drastically change the process for identifying and combating pathogens, whether they’re in a hospital, veterinarian’s office or salmon stream,” Crandall said. Researchers plan to conduct more studies to further verify the efficacy of their approach, and will soon begin to work with the aquaculture industry, helping fishermen with water-quality surveillance.

Funding for this research was provided in part by the National Institutes of Health’s (NIH) National Human Genome Research Institute under grant award number R01HG00569.

About Boston University School of Medicine
Originally established in 1848 as the New England Female Medical College, and incorporated into Boston University in 1873, Boston University School of Medicine today is a leading academic medical center with an enrollment of more than 700 medical students and more than 800 masters and PhD students. Its 1,246 full and part-time faculty members generated more than $335 million in funding in the 2009-2010 academic year for research in amyloidosis, arthritis, cardiovascular disease, cancer, infectious disease, pulmonary disease and dermatology among others. The School is affiliated with Boston Medical Center, its principal teaching hospital, the Boston and Bedford Veterans Administration Medical Centers and 16 other regional hospitals as well as the Boston HealthNet.

About George Washington University
In the heart of the nation's capital with additional programs in Virginia, the George Washington University was created by an Act of Congress in 1821. Today, GW is the largest institution of higher education in the District of Columbia. The university offers comprehensive programs of undergraduate and graduate liberal arts study, as well as degree programs in medicine, public health, law, engineering, education, business and international affairs. Each year, GW enrolls a diverse population of undergraduate, graduate and professional students from all 50 states, the District of Columbia and more than 130 countries.


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