Gender Disparities Uncovered in Desire to Receive Living Donor Kidney Transplants

Black women less likely than black men to consider the procedure to treat kidney failure

Released: 8-Aug-2014 7:00 AM EDT
Embargo expired: 14-Aug-2014 5:00 PM EDT
Source Newsroom: American Society of Nephrology (ASN)
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Citations Clinical Journal of the American Society of Nephrology

Highlights
• In 2 predominantly black dialysis clinics, women were less likely to want to undergo living donor kidney transplantation compared with men, despite being more likely than men to receive unsolicited offers for kidney transplants from family and friends.
• Women were also less likely to have been evaluated for a kidney transplant.

A kidney transplant from a living donor is the best treatment option for patients with kidney failure.

Newswise — Washington, DC (August 14, 2014) — Among black kidney failure patients undergoing dialysis, women are much less likely than men to want to receive kidney transplants from living donors, despite more offers from family and friends. The findings, which are from a study appearing in an upcoming issue of the Clinical Journal of the American Society of Nephrology (CJASN), suggest that interventions are needed to increase women’s acceptance of living donor kidney transplantation.

Living donor kidney transplantation is the treatment of choice for patients with kidney failure, but disparities exist among certain groups including blacks and women. Recent research into such disparities has focused primarily at the transplant clinic level, but disparities might be underestimated when only patients undergoing transplant evaluations are studied.

For this reason, Avrum Gillespie, MD (Temple University School of Medicine) and his colleagues looked for disparities in dialysis clinics and included patients both potentially eligible and ineligible for receiving a transplant. “Information gained about the concerns and attitudes of hemodialysis patients regarding living donor kidney transplantation might help us develop targeted interventions designed to alleviate some existing disparities,” said Dr. Gillespie.

The research team administered a transplant questionnaire to 116 patients in two urban, predominantly black hemodialysis units. Among the major findings:

• Women were less likely to want to undergo living donor kidney transplantation compared with men (58.5% vs 87.5%) despite being nearly twice as likely as men to receive unsolicited offers for kidney transplants from family and friends (73.2% vs 43.2%).
• Women were also less likely to have been evaluated for a kidney transplant (28.3% vs 52.2%).
• After controlling for various factors known to influence transplant decisions, women were 87% less likely to want to undergo living donor kidney transplantation than men.

“To help improve the gender disparities in living donor kidney transplantation, future work is needed to learn how to support and encourage women to accept transplants,” said Dr. Gillespie.

Study co-authors include Heather Hammer, PhD, Stanislav Kolenikov, PhD, Athanasia Polychronopoulou, MS, Vladimir Ouzienko, PhD, Zoran Obradovic, PhD, Megan Urbanski, MSW, Teri Browne, PhD, Patricio Silva, MD.

Disclosures: Dr. Gillespie has a Norman S. Coplon Satellite Healthcare Foundation Grant to study Hemodialysis Patient Social Networks.

The article, entitled “Sex Differences and Attitudes toward Living Donor Kidney Transplantation among Urban Black Patients on Hemodialysis,” will appear online at http://cjasn.asnjournals.org/ on August 14, 2014.

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Founded in 1966, and with more than 14,000 members, the American Society of Nephrology (ASN) leads the fight against kidney disease by educating health professionals, sharing new knowledge, advancing research, and advocating the highest quality care for patients.


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