Scientists Create 'Diamond Rain' That Forms in the Interior of Icy Giant Planets

In an experiment designed to mimic the conditions deep inside the icy giant planets of our solar system, scientists were able to observe "diamond rain" for the first time as it formed in high-pressure conditions. Extremely high pressure squeezes hydrogen and carbon found in the interior of these planets to form solid diamonds that sink slowly down further into the interior.

Nanotechnology Moves From the Clean Room to the Classroom

The U.S. Department of Energy's Argonne National Laboratory and United Scientific Supplies, Inc. are introducing high school students to nanoscience with a new hands-on product.

Discovered: A Quick and Easy Way to Shut Down Instabilities in Fusion Devices

Article describes use of second neutral beam injector to suppress instabilities on the NSTX-U

Researchers Create Molecular Movie of Virus Preparing to Infect Healthy Cells

A research team has created for the first time a movie with nanoscale resolution of the three-dimensional changes a virus undergoes as it prepares to infect a healthy cell. The scientists analyzed thousands of individual snapshots from intense X-ray flashes, capturing the process in an experiment at the Department of Energy's SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory.

Nanotechnology Gives Green Energy a Green Color

Solar panels have tremendous potential to provide affordable renewable energy, but many people see traditional black and blue panels as an eyesore. Architects, homeowners and city planners may be more open to the technology if they could install colorful, efficient solar panels, and a new study, published this week in Applied Physics Letters, brings us one step closer. Researchers have developed a method for imprinting existing solar panels with silicon nanopatterns that scatter green light back toward an observer.

New 3-D Simulations Show How Galactic Centers Cool Their Jets

Scientists at Berkeley Lab and Purdue University developed new theories and 3-D simulations to explain what's at work in the mysterious jets of energy and matter beaming from the center of galaxies at nearly the speed of light.

Are Your Tweets Feeling Well?

Study finds opinion and emotion in tweets change when you get sick, a method public health workers could use to track health trends.

"Getting to 80%" on Energy Cutbacks Cannot Occur Unless Behaviors Change

California's plan to cut energy consumption by 80 percent by 2050 cannot be achieved with current proposed policy changes because most solutions focus on changing technologies rather than changing behavior, a new UC Davis study suggests.

New Battery Material Goes with the Flow

Scientists at the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Argonne National Laboratory have engineered a new material to be used in redox flow batteries, which are particularly useful for storing electricity for the grid. The material consists of carefully structured molecules designed to be particularly electrochemically stable in order to prevent the battery from losing energy to unwanted reactions.

Simulation Demonstrates How Exposure to Plasma Makes Carbon Nanotubes Grow

PPPL research performed with collaborators from Princeton University and the Institute for Advanced Computational Science at the State University of New York at Stony Brook has shown how plasma causes exceptionally strong, microscopic structures known as carbon nanotubes to grow.

Night Vision for Bird- & Bat-Friendly Offshore Wind Power

The ThermalTracker software analyzes video with night vision, the same technology that helps soldiers see in the dark, to help birds and bats near offshore wind turbines.

Drone Tech Offers New Ways to Manage Climate Change

An innovation providing key clues to how humans might manage forests and cities to cool the planet is taking flight. Cornell researchers are using drone technology to more accurately measure surface reflectivity on the landscape, a technological advance that could offer a new way to manage climate change.

Energy Efficiency Takes a 'Village'

The city of the future could start with a village - Missouri University of Science and Technology's Solar Village, to be exact. S&T researchers will study the Solar Village and its residents as their living laboratory over the next three years thanks to an $800,000 grant from the National Institute of Food and Agriculture, funded as part of the National Science Foundation's Cyber-Physical System initiative. The research team is led by Dr. Simone Silvestri, principal investigator and assistant professor of computer science, and Dr. Denise Baker, co-principal investigator and assistant professor of psychological science

Updated Computer Code Improves Prediction of Energetic Particle Motion in Plasma Experiments

A computer code used by physicists around the world to analyze and predict tokamak experiments can now approximate the behavior of highly energetic atomic nuclei, or ions, in fusion plasmas more accurately than ever.

Defining Standards for Genomes From Uncultivated Microorganisms

In Nature Biotechnology, an international team led by DOE Joint Genome Institute researchers has developed standards for the minimum metadata to be supplied with single amplified genomes (SAGs) and metagenome-assembled genomes (MAGs) submitted to public databases.

Distributed Wind Power Keeps Spinning, Growing

America's use of distributed wind - which is wind power generated near where it will be used - continues to grow, according to the 2016 Distributed Wind Market Report.

Annual Wind Power Report Confirms Technology Advancements, Improved Project Performance, and Low Wind Energy Prices

Wind energy pricing for land-based, utility-scale projects remains attractive to utility and commercial purchasers, according to an annual report released by the U.S. Department of Energy and prepared by Berkeley Lab. Prices offered by newly built wind projects in the United States are averaging around 2 cents/kWh, driven lower by technology advancements and cost reductions.

New Battery Is Activated by Your Spit

Researchers at Binghamton University, State University of New York have developed the next step in microbial fuel cells (MFCs): a battery activated by spit that can be used in extreme conditions where normal batteries don't function.

Researchers Discover Potentially Harmful Airborne Nanoparticles Produced Through Burning of Coal

Environmental scientists led by the Virginia Tech College of Science have discovered that the burning of coal produces incredibly small airborne particles of a highly unusual form of titanium oxide with the potential to be toxic to humans.

World's Smallest Neutrino Detector Finds Big Physics Fingerprint

After more than a year of operation at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, the COHERENT experiment, using the world's smallest neutrino detector, has found a big fingerprint of the elusive, electrically neutral particles that interact only weakly with matter.

Study Reveals Exactly How Low-Cost Fuel Cell Catalysts Work

New work at Los Alamos and Oak Ridge national laboratories is resolving difficult fuel-cell performance questions, both in determining efficient new materials and understanding how they work at an atomic level.

Standard Model of the Universe Withstands Most Precise Test by Dark Energy Survey

Astrophysicists have a fairly accurate understanding of how the universe ages: That's the conclusion of new results from the Dark Energy Survey (DES), a large international science collaboration, including researchers from the Department of Energy's SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, that put models of cosmic structure formation and evolution to the most precise test yet.

Dark Energy Survey Reveals Most Accurate Measurement of Dark Matter Structure in the Universe

Dark Energy Survey scientists have unveiled the most accurate measurement ever made of the present large-scale structure of the universe. These measurements of the amount and "clumpiness" (or distribution) of dark matter in the present-day cosmos were made with a precision that, for the first time, rivals that of inferences from the early universe by the European Space Agency's orbiting Planck observatory

Vertical Axis Wind Turbines Can Offer Cheaper Electricity for Urban and Suburban Areas

Small vertical axis wind turbines (VAWTs) possess the ability to effectively operate in the presence of high turbulent flow, which makes them ideal energy harvesting devices in urban and suburban environments. In this week's Journal of Renewable and Sustainable Energy, researchers present results indicating that an optimally designed VAWT system can financially compete with fossil-fuel based power plants in urban and suburban areas, and even spearhead the development of a net-zero energy building or city.

'Perfect Liquid' Quark-Gluon Plasma Is the Most Vortical Fluid

Particle collisions recreating the quark-gluon plasma (QGP) that filled the early universe reveal that droplets of this primordial soup swirl far faster than any other fluid. The new analysis from the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) shows that the "vorticity" of the QGP surpasses the whirling fluid dynamics of super-cell tornado cores and Jupiter's Great Red Spot, and even beats out the fastest spin record held by nanodroplets of superfluid helium.