Food Science News Source

Tuesday 3-Mar-2015

Recent Research

Registration Now Open for IFT15 in Chicago

The Institute of Food Technologists (IFT), a non-profit scientific society of food scientists, technologists and related professionals from academia, government and industry, today announced that registration for IFT15: Where Science Feeds InnovationSM in Chicago, July 11-14, at McCormick Place, is now officially open. IFT15 is the only global event of its kind to feature the very latest food products, the hottest food trends and the most important developments in the world of food science.

–Institute of Food Technologists (IFT)|2015-03-03

“Clean Label” to Reignite Energy Drink Innovation

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Applied Food Sciences hosts exclusive retreat with industry experts in market trends, innovation, and regulations to address evolving energy drink market opportunities.

–Applied Food Sciences, Inc.|2015-03-02

This National Nutrition Month, the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics Encourages Everyone to 'Bite into a Healthy Lifestyle'

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There is no one food, drink, pill or machine that is the key to achieving optimal health. A person’s overall daily routine is what is most important. That is why, as part of National Nutrition Month® 2015, the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics urges everyone to “Bite into a Healthy Lifestyle.”

–Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics|2015-02-26

Changing Climate Impacts Food Production

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–South Dakota State University|2015-02-25

Widely Used Food Additive Promotes Colitis, Obesity and Metabolic Syndrome, Research Shows

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Emulsifiers, which are added to most processed foods to aid texture and extend shelf life, can alter the gut microbiota composition and localization to induce intestinal inflammation that promotes the development of inflammatory bowel disease and metabolic syndrome, new research shows.

–Georgia State University|2015-02-25

Texas Crop, Weather for Feb. 24, 2015

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Weekly summary of crop, livestock and weather conditions throughout Texas.

–Texas A&M AgriLife|2015-02-24

Do Genes Play a Role in Peanut Allergies? New Study Suggests Yes

Researchers have pinpointed a region in the human genome associated with peanut allergy in U.S. children, offering strong evidence that genes can play a role in the development of food allergies.

–Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health|2015-02-24

Peanut Allergy Expert Available to Speak on New Study

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–American College of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology (ACAAI)|2015-02-23

Early Consumption of Peanuts Prevents Peanut Allergy in High-Risk Infants

A study reported today in the New England Journal of Medicine demonstrates that consumption of a peanut-containing snack by infants who are at high-risk for developing peanut allergy prevents the subsequent development of allergy. The “Learning Early About Peanut allergy” (LEAP) study, designed and conducted by the Immune Tolerance Network and led by Gideon Lack at Kings College London, is the first randomized trial to prevent food allergy in a large cohort of high-risk infants.

–Immune Tolerance Network|2015-02-23

Breastfeeding, Other Factors Help Shape Immune System Early in Life

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Henry Ford Hospital researchers say that breastfeeding and other factors influence a baby’s immune system development and susceptibility to allergies and asthma by what’s in their gut.

–Henry Ford Health System|2015-02-21

A Broader, Global Approach to Obesity Treatment and Prevention

A recent Lancet series explores various international efforts to address obesity, and calls for public health and policy approaches to improve the food environment as it relates to obesity treatment and prevention. The Obesity Society supports ongoing dialogue and collaborative discussions with the food industry, other industry stakeholders and public health officials, and calls for developing evidence-based initiatives to improve public health.

–Obesity Society|2015-02-20

Study Finds Climate Change May Dramatically Reduce Wheat Production

A recent study involving Kansas State University researchers finds that in the coming decades at least one-quarter of the world's wheat production will be lost to extreme weather from climate change if no adaptation measures are taken.

–Kansas State University|2015-02-19

Popular Soda Ingredient Poses Cancer Risk to Consumers

Public health researchers have analyzed soda consumption data in order to characterize people’s exposure to a potentially carcinogenic byproduct of some types of caramel color. Caramel color is a common ingredient in colas and other dark soft drinks. The results show that between 44 and 58 percent of people over the age of six typically have at least one can of soda per day, possibly more, potentially exposing them to 4-methylimidazole (4-MEI), a possible human carcinogen formed during the manufacture of some kinds of caramel color.

–Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health|2015-02-18

Dairy-Free Beverages Expand the Milk Aisle

When it comes to milk, it’s no longer just about whole, two percent, skim, and flavored anymore. Consumers now have a variety of nut, grain, and seed milks that are all nondairy to choose from. In the February issue of Food Technology magazine published by the Institute of Food Technologists (IFT), IFT member David Despain writes about the increasing number of dairy-free options on the market in response to consumers’ growing in interest in plant-based milk products.

–Institute of Food Technologists (IFT)|2015-02-18

Amaranth Seeds May Prevent Chronic Diseases

The tiny seed of an amaranth grain may be able to help prevent cardiovascular disease, diabetes, and cancer, according to a review of existing research in Comprehensive Reviews in Food Science and Food Safety published by the Institute of Food Technologists (IFT).

–Institute of Food Technologists (IFT)|2015-02-18

Milk Proteins Show Promise in Prevention and Treatment of Cancer

In a review of the existing research, a team of Australian researchers found that milk proteins, consisting of short sequences called peptides, are potential candidates for the development of anticancer agents and can be generated by enzymatic action, such as those experienced during digestion or food processing, including fermentation. Their findings are in the recent issue of Comprehensive Reviews in Food Science and Food Safety published by the Institute of Food Technologists.

–Institute of Food Technologists (IFT)|2015-02-18

8 Snack and Nutrition Bar Trends

Convenience and taste are high on the list of what consumers want—especially when it comes to snack and nutrition bars. In the February issue of Food Technology magazine published by the Institute of Food Technologists (IFT), associate editor Melanie Zanoza Bartelme writes about unexpected flavors and emerging trends in the snack and nutrition bar category. Consumers can all find a bar to fulfill their specific need including people looking for a meal replacement, athletes looking to up their protein, and those looking to lose weight.

–Institute of Food Technologists (IFT)|2015-02-18

From Crickets to Test Tube Meat: The Coming Revolution in Alternative Proteins

Feeding the rapidly expanding world population will require 470 million tons of annual meat production by 2050, an increase of more than 200 million tons from current annual levels, according to the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO). Replacing and/or supplementing traditional animal protein with alternatives that require drastically lower levels of water, feed, energy and land is not only more sustainable but may result in healthier proteins too, according to the latest series of interviews from the Institute of Food Technologists (IFT) FutureFood 2050 publishing initiative.

–Institute of Food Technologists (IFT)|2015-02-18

Fluorescing Food Dyes as Probes to Improve Food Quality

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Food dyes can give cakes, candy and sodas brilliant colors of the rainbow. Now a team of food scientists at Rutgers University in New Jersey has found that food coloring may be able to play more than its traditional esthetic role in food presentation.

–Biophysical Society|2015-02-11

What's Next in Diets: Chili Peppers?

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A large percentage of the world's population -- fully one third, by the World Health Organization's estimates -- is currently overweight or obese. This staggering statistics has made finding ways to address obesity a top priority for many scientists around the globe, and now a group of researchers at the University of Wyoming has found promise in the potential of capsaicin -- the chief ingredient in chili peppers -- as a diet-based supplement.

–Biophysical Society|2015-02-08

Study Finds That Organic Food Reduces Pesticide Exposure

A new study from a researcher at Boise State is among the first to predict a person’s pesticide exposure based on information about their usual diet.

–Boise State University|2015-02-05

Shade Coffee Is for the Birds

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The conservation value of growing coffee under trees instead of on open farms is well known, but hasn’t been studied much in Africa. So a University of Utah-led research team studied birds in the Ethiopian home of Arabica coffee and found that “shade coffee” farms are good for birds, but some species do best in forest.

–University of Utah|2015-02-04

Compound Found In Grapes, Red Wine May Help Prevent Memory Loss

A compound found in common foods such as red grapes and peanuts may help prevent age-related decline in memory, according to new research published by a faculty member in the Texas A&M Health Science Center College of Medicine.

–Texas A&M University|2015-02-04

Use of Calorie Menu Labels Differs Depending on Customers’ Sociodemographic Status

A newly published research study conducted by researchers at the School of Nutrition and Health Promotion at Arizona State University, examined whether noticing and using calorie menu labels was associated with demographic characteristics of customers at a national fast food chain currently posting calorie counts. They found that approximately 60% of participants noticed the calorie menu labels but only 16% reported using the labels to determine food and beverage choices.

–Arizona State University College of Health Solutions|2015-02-03

Top Five Reasons You Need Fat in Your Diet

IFT Past President Roger Clemens, DrPh, CFS, explains why it’s important to incorporate fats in our diets in this IFT Food Facts video. Dr. Clemens emphasizes needing a balance of fats and exercise to help our body function at its highest level and reduce the risk of diseases such as cardiovascular disease.

–Institute of Food Technologists (IFT)|2015-01-29

Food Safety Fumble: Research Finds 90 Percent of Home Chefs Contaminate Food

New research from Kansas State University finds that despite receiving food safety messaging, a majority of home chefs still contaminate their food because of poor food-handling techniques.

–Kansas State University|2015-01-29

Global Food Traceability Center Submits Comments on the Presidential Task Force Recommendations for Combatting Illegal, Unreported, and Unregulated Fishing and Seafood Fraud

As part of its ongoing commitment to offering solutions for pressing food fraud issues, the Institute of Food Technologists (IFT) Global Food Traceability Center (GFTC) submitted written comments on how to most effectively implement the recommendations from the Presidential Task Force on Combatting Illegal, Unreported and Unregulated (IUU) Fishing and Seafood Fraud.

–Institute of Food Technologists (IFT)|2015-01-27

Gluten-Free Diet Is Treatment, Not Trend, for Those with Celiac Disease

For people who have celiac disease, going gluten-free isn't a lifestyle choice, it's a necessity. For everyone else, steering clear of gluten isn't necessarily a good idea.

–Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center|2015-01-27

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EXPO Presentations

IFT Publications and Journals

    Amaranth Seeds May Prevent Chronic Diseases

    The tiny seed of an amaranth grain may be able to help prevent cardiovascular disease, diabetes, and cancer, according to a review of existing research in Comprehensive Reviews in Food…

    –Institute of Food Technologists (IFT)|2015-02-18

    Milk Proteins Show Promise in Prevention and Treatment of Cancer

    In a review of the existing research, a team of Australian researchers found that milk proteins, consisting of short sequences called peptides, are potential candidates for the development of anticancer…

    –Institute of Food Technologists (IFT)|2015-02-18