Food Science News Source

Saturday 25-Apr-2015

Recent Research

Expanding Global Food Production in a Warming World

Agriculture can be both a victim and a cause of climate change, say global warming experts. But new sustainable strategies that can help farming adapt to hotter conditions may help reduce agriculture’s carbon footprint too.

–Institute of Food Technologists (IFT)|2015-04-21

Mount Sinai Scientists Find Unprecedented Microbial Diversity in Isolated Amazonian Tribe Previously Unexposed to Antibiotics or Processed Foods

Scientists from the Icahn School of Medicine, collaborating with a multicenter team of U.S. and Venezuelan researchers, have discovered the most diverse collection of bacteria yet in humans among an isolated tribe of Yanomami Amerindians in the remote Amazonian jungles of Venezuela.

–Mount Sinai Medical Center|2015-04-17

Trending Stories Report for 16 April 2015

Trending news releases with the most views in a single day. Topics include:sustainability, COPD, neurology, cancer, sleep, food, and genetics.

–Newswise Trends|2015-04-16

Mushrooms Boost Immunity

Could a mushroom a day help keep the doctor away? Some early evidence from a new UF/IFAS study indicates mushrooms boost immunity.

–University of Florida Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences|2015-04-16

Research Identifies Barriers in Tracking Meals and What Foodies Want

Researchers studied how mobile-based food journals integrate into everyday life and specific challenges when using food journaling technology. Their research suggests how future designs might make it easier and more effective.

–Georgia Institute of Technology|2015-04-16

The Difference between “Use-By” “Sell-By” and “Best-By” Dates

Confusion over date labeling leads to billions of pounds of food waste every year. Bob Brackett, PhD CFS, Director of the Institute for Food Safety and Health at the Illinois Institute of Technology and IFT spokesperson explains the difference between “use-by,” “sell-by,” and “best-by” dates.

–Institute of Food Technologists (IFT)|2015-04-15

Top Ten Food Trends for 2015

The April 2015 issue of Food Technology magazine published by the Institute of Food Technologists (IFT) features Contributing Editor A. Elizabeth Sloan’s insights on the top food trends for 2015.

–Institute of Food Technologists (IFT)|2015-04-15

8 Nutrients to Protect the Aging Brain

Brain health is the second most important component in maintaining a healthy lifestyle according to a 2014 AARP study. As people age they can experience a range of cognitive issues from decreased critical thinking to dementia and Alzheimer’s disease. In the March issue of Food Technology published by the Institute of Food Technologists (IFT), contributing editor Linda Milo Ohr writes about eight nutrients that may help keep your brain in good shape.

–Institute of Food Technologists (IFT)|2015-04-15

Expert Available: The Scientific Art of Cooking

–Wake Forest University|2015-04-15

Prohibition 2.0?

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Why are there so few breweries in the U.S. South? A University of Louisville economics professor who has researched the issue says the reason can be traced to strong, anti-alcohol religious beliefs permeating throughout the Deep South.

–University of Louisville|2015-04-14

Research Shows Pears Could Be Part of a Healthy Diet to Manage Diabetes

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While the phrase “an apple a day” is a popular saying, a new study suggests that pears as part of a healthy diet could play a role in helping to manage type 2 diabetes and diabetes-induced hypertension. The results of research published in Food Research International show potential health benefits of Bartlett and Starkrimson pears.

–North Dakota State University|2015-04-10

Trending Stories Report for 7 April 2015

Trending news releases with the most views in a single day. Topics include: education, children's health, autism, obesity, smoking, weight loss, LHC re-start, malaria, food safety, kidney disease, and avian flu.

–Newswise Trends|2015-04-07

Pomegranate-Date Cocktail a Day Keeps the Dr. Away

Pomegranates and dates are delicious, increasingly trendy, and healthy to boot. As it turns out, when consumed together they are a winning combination in the war against heart disease.

–American Technion Society|2015-04-06

Slim by Chocolate

Article in International Archives of Medicine on Chocolate with high Cocoa content as a weight-loss accelerator.

–Institute of Diet and Health|2015-04-02

Blueberries Show Promise as Treatment for Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder

Roughly 8 percent of people in the US suffer from post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). SSRIs, such as Zoloft and Paxil, are the only currently-approved therapy, but their effectiveness is marginal. LSU researchers have found that blueberries could be an effective treatment. Research will be presented at the 2015 Experimental Biology Meeting on Monday, 3/30.

–American Physiological Society (APS)|2015-03-30

Highly Processed Foods Dominate U.S. Grocery Purchases

A nation-wide analysis of grocery purchases reveals that highly processed foods make up more than 60 percent of the calories in food we buy, and these items tend to have more fat, sugar and salt than less-processed foods.

–Federation of American Societies for Experimental Biology (FASEB)|2015-03-28

Love the Cook, Love the Food: Attraction to Comfort Food Linked to Positive Social Connections

A big bowl of mashed potatoes. What about spaghetti and meatballs? Sushi? Regardless of what you identify as comfort food, it’s likely the attraction to that dish is based on having a good relationship with the person you remember first preparing it.

–University at Buffalo|2015-03-27

Food Scientist Available to Discuss Amy's Recall of 73,000 Frozen Meals

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–Institute of Food Technologists (IFT)|2015-03-25

Fat Turns From Diabetes Foe to Potential Treatment

A new weapon in the war against type 2 diabetes is coming in an unexpected form: fat. Researchers have discovered a new class of potentially therapeutic lipids, called FAHFAs, that are at low levels in people with insulin resistance, a risk factor for diabetes. FAHFAs improved glucose metabolism and insulin secretion in diabetic mice. The team will describe their approach at the 249th National Meeting & Exposition of the American Chemical Society.

–American Chemical Society (ACS)|2015-03-24

More Flavorful, Healthful Chocolate Could Be on Its Way

Chocolate has many health benefits — it can potentially lower blood pressure and cholesterol and reduce stroke risk. But just as connoisseurs thought it couldn’t get any better, there’s this tasty new tidbit: Researchers have found a way to make the treat even more nutritious –– and sweeter. They will describe their research here today at the 249th National Meeting & Exposition of the American Chemical Society.

–American Chemical Society (ACS)|2015-03-24

Popular Artificial Sweetener Could Lead to New Treatments for Aggressive Cancers

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Saccharin, the artificial sweetener that is the main ingredient in Sweet ‘N Low®, Sweet Twin® and Necta®, could do far more than just keep our waistlines trim. According to new research, this popular sugar substitute could potentially lead to the development of drugs capable of combating aggressive, difficult-to-treat cancers with fewer side effects.

–American Chemical Society (ACS)|2015-03-23

New Low-Calorie Rice Could Help Cut Rising Obesity Rates

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Scientists have developed a new, simple way to cook rice that could cut the number of calories absorbed by the body by more than half, potentially reducing obesity rates, which is especially important in countries where the food is a staple.

–American Chemical Society (ACS)|2015-03-23

Special Microbes Make Anti-Obesity Molecule in the Gut

Microbes may just be the next diet craze. Researchers have programmed bacteria to generate a molecule that, through normal metabolism, becomes a hunger-suppressing lipid. Mice that drank water laced with the programmed bacteria ate less, had lower body fat and staved off diabetes — even when fed a high-fat diet — offering a potential weight-loss strategy for humans. The team will describe their approach at the 249th National Meeting & Exposition of the American Chemical Society.

–American Chemical Society (ACS)|2015-03-22

Vitamin D May Keep Low-Grade Prostate Cancer From Becoming Aggressive

Taking vitamin D supplements could slow or even reverse the progression of less aggressive, or low-grade, prostate tumors without the need for surgery or radiation, a scientist will report today at the 249th National Meeting & Exposition of the American Chemical Society.

–American Chemical Society (ACS)|2015-03-22

Why Food Will Continue to Get Safer

The days of widespread foodborne illness outbreaks may be waning as researchers find faster, more precise ways to detect and prevent food contamination, reports the latest interview series from FutureFood 2050.

–Institute of Food Technologists (IFT)|2015-03-19

Scientists Confirm Institute of Medicine Recommendation for Vitamin D Intake Was Miscalculated and Is Far Too Low

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Researchers are challenging the intake of vitamin D recommended by the National Academy of Sciences Institute of Medicine saying their Recommended Dietary Allowance for vitamin D underestimates the need by a factor of ten.

–Creighton University|2015-03-17

Food TV Could Be Harmful to Your Health

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Women who watched food television and cooked frequently from scratch had a higher body-mass-index, or BMI – weighing on average 10 more pounds – than those who obtained information from sources like family and friends, magazines and newspapers, or cooking classes. Women who watched food television but didn’t cook from scratch failed to see their viewing habits translate to a higher BMI.

–University of Vermont|2015-03-17

New Research Finds Consumers Willing to Spend More for Biotech Potato Products

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New research from an Iowa State University economist found consumers were willing to spend more for biotech potato products with reduced levels of a chemical compound linked to cancer.

–Iowa State University|2015-03-16

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