Obesity News Source

Sunday 1-May-2016

Recent Research

Inadequate Financial Savings Tied to Increased Childhood Health Risks

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The connection between a family’s income and childhood health has been well-established, with lower income linked to poorer health and a greater likelihood of more chronic conditions. Now a new study by UCLA researchers shows that the size of the paycheck is not all that matters when it comes to children’s health risks. So does the amount that a family has tucked away in savings.

–University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA), Health Sciences|2016-04-30

Want to Eat Better? Sorry, We’re Closed.

Getting more nutritious meals on the tables of low-income Americans could depend on the hours the stores in their neighborhoods keep. Stores likely to sell fresh produce aren’t open as long in areas with more socioeconomic struggles, and that problem is more pronounced in neighborhoods where many African Americans live, new research from The Ohio State University has found.

–Ohio State University|2016-04-28

Junk-Food Junkies Go Healthy When Rewarded

According to new Cornell University research, the most effective strategy for influencing such healthy food choices is not calorie counts and reduced prices, but rather more subtle incentives that reward healthy eating behavior.

–Cornell University|2016-04-28

Eating Chocolate Each Day Could Reduce Heart Disease and Diabetes Risk

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A new study published in the British Journal of Nutrition appears to back up the adage that a little of what you fancy does you good. Including a small amount of chocolate each day could help prevent diabetes and insulin resistance. That’s one of the research findings from the Luxembourg Institute of Health (LIH), the University of Warwick Medical School, the University of South Australia and the University of Maine.

–University of Warwick|2016-04-28

How Families with Seriously-Ill Children Manage Social Interactions, How Migraines Affect the Family, Families with Kids Increasingly Live Near Families Just Like Them, and More in the Family and Parenting channel

How Families with Seriously-Ill Children Manage Social Interactions, How Migraines Affect the Family, Families with Kids Increasingly Live Near Families Just Like Them, and more in the Family and Parenting channel

– Newswise|2016-04-27

Filling Nutrient Gaps in Specialty Diets

Paleo, high-protein, low-carb, gluten-free, vegetarian and vegan eating lifestyles have all exploded in popularity in the last few years. Whether people adopt these diets in order to lose weight or maintain overall wellness, consumers that follow them may be missing out on some essential nutrients. In the April issue of Food Technology Magazine, Linda Mila Ohr writes about the nutrient gaps in these various diets and how consumers can make sure they get the nutrients they need.

–Institute of Food Technologists (IFT)|2016-04-27

Pinellas County a Model for Mosquito-Borne Disease Surveillance, Scientists Unravel the Genetic Evolution of Zika Virus, Worm Infection Counters Inflammatory Bowel Disease and more in the Infectious Diseases News Source

Pinellas County a Model for Mosquito-Borne Disease Surveillance, Scientists Unravel the Genetic Evolution of Zika Virus, Worm Infection Counters Inflammatory Bowel Disease and more in the Infectious Diseases News Source

– Newswise|2016-04-27

BIDMC Scientist Barbara B. Kahn, MD, Awarded Banting Medal from American Diabetes Association

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Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center’s Barbara B. Kahn, MD, an international leader in the field of diabetes, endocrinology and metabolism whose research has identified fundamental molecular mechanisms underlying obesity, insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes, will receive the 2016 Banting Medal for Scientific Achievement from the American Diabetes Association (ADA) at the ADA Scientific Sessions in June.

–Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center|2016-04-26

Students Grow Tiger Gardens at Clemson in Quest to Fight Obesity

A group of Clemson University students believes everyone should have access to healthy foods. The students are developing Tiger Gardens to demonstrate how healthy vegetables can be grown anywhere, even on concrete.

–Clemson University|2016-04-26

Hamburg, Shalala, Glickman Headline Food Law Conference at Georgetown University

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Former FDA Commissioner Margaret Hamburg, Clinton Foundation President and former U.S. Secretary of Health Donna E. Shalala, and former U.S. Secretary of Agriculture Dan Glickman headline a unique conference focused on food issues, “Vote Food 2016: Better Food, Better Health,” on June 3 in Washington, DC.

–O'Neill Institute for National & Global Health Law|2016-04-26

Despite Efforts, Childhood Obesity Remains on the Rise

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The alarming increase in U.S. childhood obesity rates that began nearly 30 years ago continues unabated, with the biggest increases in severe obesity, according to a study led by a Duke Clinical Research Institute scientist.

–Duke Health|2016-04-26

Study Finds No Decline in U.S. Childhood Obesity Levels; Rates of Severe Obesity Continue to Climb

Those who follow along with headlines in the news may be led to believe that rates of childhood obesity are declining; however new research published in Obesity, the scientific journal of The Obesity Society, suggests there is no evidence of a decrease in the prevalence of childhood obesity in the U.S. and, what’s more, rates of children with severe obesity are on the rise especially among minority children compared to their white counterparts.

–Obesity Society|2016-04-26

Why Is Visceral Fat Worse Than Subcutaneous Fat?

Researchers have long-known that visceral fat – the kind that wraps around the internal organs – is more dangerous than subcutaneous fat that lies just under the skin around the belly, thighs and rear. But how visceral fat contributes to insulin resistance and inflammation has remained unknown. A study led by researchers at the University of Illinois at Chicago points blame at a regulatory molecule in cells called TRIP-Br2 that is produced in response to overeating’s stress on the machinery cells use to produce proteins.

–University of Illinois at Chicago|2016-04-25

Has Virginity Lost Its Virtue? Prevalence of Homosexuality in Men Is Stable Throughout Time Thanks to Genetics, Peer Pressure May Have Turned Humans Into Monogamists, and more in the Sex and Relationships Channel

Has Virginity Lost Its Virtue? Prevalence of Homosexuality in Men Is Stable Throughout Time Thanks to Genetics, Peer Pressure May Have Turned Humans Into Monogamists, and more in the Sex and Relationships Channel

– Newswise|2016-04-22

Infant BMI Is a Good Predictor of Obesity at Age 2

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Babies with a high body mass index (BMI) at age 2 months are at risk for obesity at age 2 years. Pediatric researchers say that BMI better predicts early childhood obesity than weight-for-length, the current standard measurement.

–Children's Hospital of Philadelphia|2016-04-22

Alcohol, Processed Meat, Obesity and #Stomachcancer Risk: @Fred Hutch Expert Available to Discuss Newly Discovered Link

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–Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center|2016-04-20

Chemical Exposure Could Lead to Obesity, UGA Study Finds

Exposure to chemicals found in everyday products could affect the amount of fat stored in the body, according to a study by University of Georgia researchers. Phthalates are chemicals found in everything from plastic products to soap to nail polish—they give plastic its bendy stretch.

–University of Georgia|2016-04-20

Alliance Launches New National Physical Activity Plan

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New U.S. National Physical Activity Plan Focuses on Achievements, Two New Sectors and Need for Momentum

–American College of Sports Medicine (ACSM)|2016-04-20

Childhood Obesity, Malnutrition Connected to Mom's Perception of Child's Weight

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A new study from the University of Houston Department of Health and Human Performance finds a child's risk for obesity or malnutrition may be tied to the mother's misperception of her child's weight status. A key to understanding this phenomenon may lie in how she regards her own weight status. Researchers say the situation shows that healthcare providers need to broaden their health care screenings.

–University of Houston|2016-04-20

The Role of Family and the Media in Childhood Obesity, and more Children's Health News in the Newswise Channels

Click to visit the Children's Health Channel

– Newswise|2016-04-20

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The Obesity News Source is project by Newswise to promote obesity research and clinical news to the public and news media.

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