Sponsored By AIP
AIP|American Institute of Physics

Sponsored By AIP

AIP|American Institute of Physics


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New Study Reveals the Mystery Behind the Formation of Hollowed Nanoparticles During Metal Oxidation

In a newly published Science paper, Argonne and Temple University researchers reveal new knowledge about the behavior of metal nanoparticles when they undergo oxidation, by integrating X-ray imaging and computer modeling and simulation. This knowledge adds to our understanding of fundamental processes like oxidation and corrosion.

What Can You Study in Femtoseconds? High Energy Density Physics

It might be difficult to imagine a job that spans understanding the cosmos, bringing fusion energy to Earth, and treating cancer, but that's exactly what Siegfried Glenzer does.

Rare Supernova Discovery Ushers in New Era for Cosmology

With help from a supernova-hunting pipeline based at NERSC, astronomers captured multiple images of a gravitationally lensed Type 1a supernova. This is currently the only one, but if astronomers can find more they may be able to measure Universal expansion within four percent accuracy. Luckily, Berkeley Lab researchers do have a method for finding more.

New High-Tech Lab Enables NAU Researchers, Students to Command Mars Curiosity Rover

Christopher Edwards, Assistant Professor of Physics and Astronomy at Northern Arizona University, just opened the new Mars Rover Operations and Analysis Laboratory on the NAU campus, where faculty researchers and students will use sophisticated equipment to help command the day-to-day activities of NASA's Mars Science Laboratory Curiosity Rover (MSL) currently operating on the surface of Mars.

A New Angle on Two Spiral Galaxies for Hubble's 27th Birthday

Hubble Space Telescope celebrates its 27th birthday with a striking pair of very different looking spiral galaxies. The edge-on galaxy (left) is called NGC 4302, and the tilted galaxy (right) is called NGC 4298. Although the pinwheel galaxies look quite different because they are angled at different positions on the sky, they are actually quite similar in terms of their structure and contents.

Johns Hopkins APL Collaborates with Facebook's Building 8 to Develop Breakthrough Brain-Computer Interface Technologies

The Lab has been designing noninvasive optical imaging methods to increase the reach of neural prosthetics, and ultimately produce technologies that could offer high-speed, thought-driven interfaces.

Live Webcast to Explore the "Soundtrack" of the Universe

In a live webcast on May 3, physicist and author Janna Levin will discuss the landmark detection of gravitational waves and what it means for our understanding of our universe.

Creation of Artificial Atoms

For the first time, scientists created a tunable artificial atom in graphene. The results from this research demonstrate a viable, controllable, and reversible technique to confine electrons in graphene.


What Can You Study in Femtoseconds? High Energy Density Physics

It might be difficult to imagine a job that spans understanding the cosmos, bringing fusion energy to Earth, and treating cancer, but that's exactly what Siegfried Glenzer does.

New High-Tech Lab Enables NAU Researchers, Students to Command Mars Curiosity Rover

Christopher Edwards, Assistant Professor of Physics and Astronomy at Northern Arizona University, just opened the new Mars Rover Operations and Analysis Laboratory on the NAU campus, where faculty researchers and students will use sophisticated equipment to help command the day-to-day activities of NASA's Mars Science Laboratory Curiosity Rover (MSL) currently operating on the surface of Mars.

Johns Hopkins APL Collaborates with Facebook's Building 8 to Develop Breakthrough Brain-Computer Interface Technologies

The Lab has been designing noninvasive optical imaging methods to increase the reach of neural prosthetics, and ultimately produce technologies that could offer high-speed, thought-driven interfaces.

Live Webcast to Explore the "Soundtrack" of the Universe

In a live webcast on May 3, physicist and author Janna Levin will discuss the landmark detection of gravitational waves and what it means for our understanding of our universe.

Creation of Artificial Atoms

For the first time, scientists created a tunable artificial atom in graphene. The results from this research demonstrate a viable, controllable, and reversible technique to confine electrons in graphene.

How Do You Catch Femtosecond Light?

Gabriella Carini enjoys those little moments--after hours and hours of testing in clean rooms, labs and at X-ray beamlines--when she first sees an instrument work.

How Do You Make a Femtosecond Light Source?

Agostino "Ago" Marinelli first met pioneering accelerator physicist Claudio Pellegrini as an undergraduate student at the University of Rome. It was 2007, a couple of years before the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) came online at SLAC, and people were abuzz about free-electron laser physics.

Why Study in Femtoseconds?

The text on this screen may appear stable enough, but every molecule, atom, and electron in it is in constant motion. The laws of quantum physics require that on the atomic scale nothing is ever truly at rest. Nano-sized motion also keeps us warm, cooks our food, lights our smartphones, and enables all of our senses of hearing, sight, smell, taste, and touch.

How X-Rays Pushed Topological Matter R&D Over the Top

Pioneering X-ray experiments at Berkeley Lab's Advanced Light Source (ALS) helped bring to life decades-old theories about exotic topological states of matter, and the ALS continues to play an important role in this flourishing field of research.

Thomas Allison's "Molecular Movies" Concept Takes Home the $200K Discovery Prize

Thomas Allison, PhD, Assistant Professor in the Departments of Chemistry and Physics, and a developer of a technology at Stony Brook that will record the movement of molecules that may lead to the development of better high-tech devices, is the winner of the 2017 Discovery Prize.