Sponsored By AIP
AIP|American Institute of Physics

Sponsored By AIP

AIP|American Institute of Physics


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Plumbing the Possibilities of 'Seeing Around Corners'

Morgridge Institute for Research and University of Wisconsin-Madison researchers are working to optimize a camera capable of a slick optical trick: snapping pictures around corners.

Tiny 3-D Models May Yield Big Insights Into Ovarian Cancer

With a unique approach that draws on 3-D printing technologies, a team of University of Wisconsin-Madison researchers is developing new tools for understanding how ovarian cancer develops in women.

Team Led by Texas Tech Physicists Discovers Loneliest Young Star

Alone on the cosmic road, far from any known celestial object, a young, independent star is going through a tremendous growth spurt. when a team led by Texas Tech University Department of Physics associate professor Tom Maccarone and postdoctoral researcher Chris Britt examined infrared images of the same area, they realized this object has a lot of warm dust around it, which must have been heated by an outburst. Researchers determined it likely is a young star that has been outbursting for several years.

More Power to You

Engineers from the University of Utah and the University of Minnesota have discovered that interfacing two particular oxide-based materials makes them highly conductive, a boon for future electronics that could result in much more power-efficient laptops, electric cars and home appliances that also don't need cumbersome power supplies.

Plasma Technology Can Be Tapped to Kill Biofilms on Perishable Fruit, Foods

Seeing fruit "turn bad and going to waste" inspired a team of researchers in China to explore using atmospheric pressure nonequilibrium plasma -- already widely used for medical purposes -- as a novel solution to extend the shelf life of fruit and other perishable foods. Now they report in Physics of Plasmas about their computational study of how air plasma interacts with bacterial biofilms on an apple's surface suggests that plasma technology could be used to decontaminate food in the future.

Making Terahertz Lasers More Powerful

Researchers have nearly doubled the continuous output power of a type of laser, called a terahertz quantum cascade laser, with potential applications in medical imaging, airport security and more. Increasing the continuous output power of these lasers is an important step toward increasing the range of practical applications. The researchers report their results in the journal AIP Advances.

American Physical Society Names ORNL's Holifield Facility Historic Physics Site

The American Physical Society (APS) on Monday honored the Holifield Radioactive Ion Beam Facility, located at the Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory, as an APS Historic Physics Site.

Network Physicist Sheds Light on Alzheimer's, Schizophrenia

Researchers comparing mouse and macaque brains have found evidence of an evolutionary universal brain structure in mammals that enables comparisons of cortical networks between species. A new study from a researcher at the University of Notre Dame could provide insights into brain disorders such as Alzheimer's and schizophrenia.

Unusual New Zoantharian Species Is the First Described Solitary Species in Over 100 Years

A very unusual new species of zoantharian surprised Drs Takuma Fujii and James Davis Reimer, affiliated with Kagoshima University and University of the Ryukyus.

Join SelectScience for Champagne and Canapes at AACC

The winner of the Best New Clinical Laboratory Product of 2015, as voted for by you, will be announced at our Clinical Scientists' Choice Awards(r) Party, at the AACC Annual Meeting & Clinical Lab Expo, 2016 in Philadelphia, US.


Plumbing the Possibilities of 'Seeing Around Corners'

Morgridge Institute for Research and University of Wisconsin-Madison researchers are working to optimize a camera capable of a slick optical trick: snapping pictures around corners.

Tiny 3-D Models May Yield Big Insights Into Ovarian Cancer

With a unique approach that draws on 3-D printing technologies, a team of University of Wisconsin-Madison researchers is developing new tools for understanding how ovarian cancer develops in women.

Stanford, SLAC X-Ray Studies Could Help Make LIGO Gravitational Wave Detector 10 Times More Sensitive

Scientists from Stanford University and the Department of Energy's SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory are using powerful X-rays to study high-performance mirror coatings that could help make the LIGO gravitational wave observatory 10 times more sensitive to cosmic events that ripple space-time.

Better Long-Range Sensors a Goal of Fundamental Optics Experiments

A pair of University of Alabama in Huntsville (UAH) researchers aim to explore fundamental properties of infrasonic optical sensors that could make them more sensitive and accurate over long distances.

Jupiter 'MRI' to Reveal Solar System Secrets

NASA will celebrate July 4th by firing the rockets of its Juno mission spacecraft, sending the probe into Jupiter's orbit 534 million miles from Earth. NASA-funded researcher and current UofL dynamic meteorology professor Tim Dowling, says the mission will use magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to reveal answers to questions that have puzzled astronomers for more than 400 years.

Jupiter Rendezvous

On Independence Day, a NASA spacecraft will enter Jupiter's orbit, and the University of Iowa has an instrument along for the ride. The Plasma Waves Instrument, designed and built at the UI, will sample plasma waves and learn how Jupiter's intense auroras are produced.

Asteroid Day Will Draw Eyes to the Stars, but the More Urgent Threat May Be Under Our Feet

Knowing when an asteroid could impact Earth would be nice, but learning more about the impact a super volcano eruption at Yellowstone would have on civilization -- and how to be ready for it -- might be more prudent.

Missouri S&T Physicist Works to Predict Atom Movement

By laser-cooling atom clusters and studying their movements, a Missouri University of Science and Technology researcher hopes to better understand how atoms and their components are impacted and directed by environmental factors.

Learning About the Future From the Distant Past

Our universe came to life nearly 14 billion years ago in the Big Bang -- a tremendously energetic fireball from which the cosmos has been expanding ever since. Today, space is filled with hundreds of billions of galaxies, including our solar system's own galactic home, the Milky Way. But how exactly did the infant universe develop into its current state, and what does it tell us about our future?