Sponsored By AIP
AIP|American Institute of Physics

Sponsored By AIP

AIP|American Institute of Physics


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In a Quantum Race Everyone Is Both a Winner and a Loser

Our understanding of the world is mostly built on basic perceptions, such as that events follow each other in a well-defined order. Such definite orders are required in the macroscopic world, for which the laws of classical physics apply. However, in the quantum world orders can be 'scrambled'. It is possible for different orders of quantum operations to coexist in a superposition. The current work by a team of physicists from the University of Vienna and the Austrian Academy of Sciences is the first experimental quantification of such a superposition. It will be published in an upcoming issue of "Science Advances".

Two Brookhaven Lab Physicists Named 2016 American Physical Society Fellows

Michiko Minty heads the group of physicists, engineers, and technicians at Brookhaven Lab responsible for designing, installing, operating, and maintaining equipment that monitors charged particle beams zipping around Brookhaven's accelerators, including RHIC, at nearly the speed of light.

Brookhaven Scientists Named Innovators of the Year

Evgeny Nazaretski and Yong Chu, physicists at the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Brookhaven National Lab, have been recognized by Innovate Long Island as Innovators of the Year for leading the development of the multilayer Laue lens microscope.

Milky Way-Like Galaxies in Early Universe Embedded in 'Super Halos'

Using ALMA, astronomers have directly observed a pair of Milky Way-like galaxies seen when the universe was only eight percent of its current age. These progenitors of today's giant spiral galaxies are surrounded by "super halos" of hydrogen gas that extend many hundreds-of-thousands of light-years beyond their dusty, star-filled disks.

Gravitational Wave Kicks Monster Black Hole Out of Galactic Core

An international team of astronomers using NASA's Hubble Space Telescope have uncovered a supermassive black hole that has been propelled out of the center of the distant galaxy 3C 186. The black hole was most likely ejected by the power of gravitational waves.

Brookhaven Lab's Bjoern Schenke Receives Zimanyi Medal

Bjoern Schenke, a theoretical physicist at the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Brookhaven National Laboratory, has been awarded the 2017 Zimanyi Medal in Nuclear Theory.

Secrets to Scientific Success: Planning and Coordination

Very often there are people behind the scenes of scientific advances, quietly organizing the project's logistics. New facilities and big collaborations require people to create schedules, manage resources, and communicate among teams. Brookhaven National Laboratory is lucky to have Xiaofeng Guo in its ranks.

New Study Maps Space Dust in 3-D

A new Berkeley Lab-led study provides detailed 3-D views of space dust in the Milky Way, which could help us understand the properties of this dust and how it affects views of distant objects.

Hans Dehmelt -- Nobel Laureate and University of Washington Professor Emeritus -- Has Died at Age 94

Hans Georg Dehmelt, Nobel physics laureate and professor emeritus at the University of Washington, died in Seattle on March 7, 2017 at age 94. Dehmelt was a celebrated scientist who developed methods to isolate atoms and subatomic particles and measure their fundamental properties with high accuracy.


Two Brookhaven Lab Physicists Named 2016 American Physical Society Fellows

Michiko Minty heads the group of physicists, engineers, and technicians at Brookhaven Lab responsible for designing, installing, operating, and maintaining equipment that monitors charged particle beams zipping around Brookhaven's accelerators, including RHIC, at nearly the speed of light.

Brookhaven Scientists Named Innovators of the Year

Evgeny Nazaretski and Yong Chu, physicists at the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Brookhaven National Lab, have been recognized by Innovate Long Island as Innovators of the Year for leading the development of the multilayer Laue lens microscope.

Brookhaven Lab's Bjoern Schenke Receives Zimanyi Medal

Bjoern Schenke, a theoretical physicist at the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Brookhaven National Laboratory, has been awarded the 2017 Zimanyi Medal in Nuclear Theory.

Secrets to Scientific Success: Planning and Coordination

Very often there are people behind the scenes of scientific advances, quietly organizing the project's logistics. New facilities and big collaborations require people to create schedules, manage resources, and communicate among teams. Brookhaven National Laboratory is lucky to have Xiaofeng Guo in its ranks.

Hans Dehmelt -- Nobel Laureate and University of Washington Professor Emeritus -- Has Died at Age 94

Hans Georg Dehmelt, Nobel physics laureate and professor emeritus at the University of Washington, died in Seattle on March 7, 2017 at age 94. Dehmelt was a celebrated scientist who developed methods to isolate atoms and subatomic particles and measure their fundamental properties with high accuracy.

The Future of Astronomy: ALMA and the Next Generation VLA - A Newswise Live Expert Panel Discussion

Two of the most iconic telescopes on Earth - the Very Large Array, or VLA as its known, and ALMA, the trailblazing Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array - are helping us understand our cosmic origins, but their stories are just beginning. New technology and future expansions will greatly enhance their abilities, revealing never-before-seen details of the cosmos. Two astronomers explain the latest discoveries and future upgrades for these powerful instruments.

Scientists Make the Case to Restore Pluto's Planet Status

Kirby Runyon wants to make one thing clear: Regardless of what one prestigious scientific organization says to the contrary, Pluto is a planet. So, he says, is Europa, commonly known as a moon of Jupiter, and so is the Earth's moon, and so are more than 100 other celestial bodies in our solar system that are denied this status under the prevailing definition of "planet."

Ostrowski Receives CAREER Award to Support Groundbreaking Research in Photochemistry

BGSU photochemist Dr. Alexis Ostrowski and her lab are venturing into a whole new world of materials with properties as yet unknown, but that offer the promise of beneficial applications in health, industry, agriculture and other fields.

Modeling the "Flicker" of Gluons in Subatomic Smashups

A new model identifies a high degree of fluctuations in the glue-like particles that bind quarks within protons as essential to explaining proton structure.

Rare Nickel Atom Has "Doubly Magic" Structure

Supercomputing calculations confirm that rare nickel-78 has unusual structure, offering insights into supernovas.