Sponsored By AIP
AIP|American Institute of Physics

Sponsored By AIP

AIP|American Institute of Physics


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Understanding 'Glass Relaxation' and Why It's Important for Next-Generation Displays

Display manufacturers can account for a certain level of relaxation in the glass, referring to the intermolecular rearrangement, if it's known and reproducible. But fluctuations in this relaxation behavior tend to introduce uncertainty into the manufacturing process, possibly leading to misalignment of pixels within displays. Now, researchers reports on a new modeling technique to quantify and predict glass relaxation fluctuations, important for next-generation displays.

Why Are There Different 'Flavors' of Iron Around the Solar System?

New work shows that interactions between iron and nickel under the extreme pressures and temperatures similar to a planetary interior can help scientists understand the period in our Solar System's youth when planets were forming and their cores were created.

Origin of Spooky Meteor Noises Reappraised by Sandia Researchers

Sound travels more slowly than light. Then why do sounds of meteors entering earth's atmosphere precede or accompany the sight of them? Sandia researchers believe they have an answer.

Geneseo Planetary Geologist Involved in Determining Next Mars Rover Landing Site

Nicholas Warner, assistant professor of geology, was among planetary geologists recently presenting evidence to NASA scientists on the best Mars landing sites for the next rover mission, scheduled to launch in 2020.

Molecular Phenomenon Discovered by Advanced NMR Facility

Cutting edge technology has shown a molecule self-assembling into different forms when passing between solution state to solid state, and back again - a curious phenomenon in science - says research by the University of Warwick.

Protein Structure Solved From Smallest Crystals Yet

An international team of scientists used an X-ray laser at the Department of Energy's SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory to determine the structure of an insect virus's crystalline protein "cocoon."

Breakthrough in 'Wonder' Materials Paves Way for Flexible Tech

Gadgets are set to become flexible, highly efficient and much smaller, following a breakthrough in measuring two-dimensional 'wonder' materials by the University of Warwick.


Geneseo Planetary Geologist Involved in Determining Next Mars Rover Landing Site

Nicholas Warner, assistant professor of geology, was among planetary geologists recently presenting evidence to NASA scientists on the best Mars landing sites for the next rover mission, scheduled to launch in 2020.

Lightning Sensor Launch Saturday Brings Decades of Work to Fruition

In the mid 1990s, when NASA built two identical Lightning Imaging Sensors (just in case), Dr. Hugh Christian planned all along to send the flight spare into space. He just didn't expect it to take almost 20 years for that to happen.

Planeterrella Recreates Earth's Vivid Lightshows in Miniature

University of Iowa students have built a device to recreate Earth's auroras and other space phenomena in miniature. The planeterrella is the only one of its kind in Iowa and one of just a handful in the United States.

Next-Gen Dark Matter Detector in a Race to Finish Line

The race is on to build the most sensitive U.S.-based experiment designed to directly detect dark matter particles. Department of Energy officials have formally approved a key construction milestone that will propel the project toward its April 2020 goal for completion.

The Truth is Way, Way Out There

Jason Steffen, an assistant professor of physics and astronomy at UNLV, discusses the ways in which exoplanet research have shaken up the theoretical models.

SDSC's 'Comet' Supercomputer Surpasses '10,000 Users' Milestone

Comet, the petascale supercomputer at the San Diego Supercomputer Center (SDSC), an Organized Research Unit of UC San Diego, has easily surpassed its target of serving at least 10,000 researchers across a diverse range of science disciplines, from astrophysics to redrawing the "tree of life".

Live Webcast to Focus on How the Financial System Is Shaped by Physicists

In a live webcast February 1, James Weatherall will tell the story of how innovative physicists and mathematicians have shaped global finance since the Second World War.

Neutrons and a 'Bit of Gold' Uncover New Type of Quantum Phase Transition

In a paper published in Physical Review Letters, a team of researchers led by the Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory reports the discovery of a new type of quantum phase transition. This unique transition happens at an elastic quantum critical point, or QCP, where the phase transition isn't driven by thermal energy but instead by the quantum fluctuations of the atoms themselves.

A Quark Like No Other

A University of Iowa physicist is at the forefront of the search to confirm the existence of a particle believed to give mass to all matter. Her group helped build and operates a sub-detector to search for bottom quarks, which are thought to appear when a Higgs boson decays.

Brookhaven National Laboratory's Top-10 Science Successes of 2016

From advances in accelerators and experiments exploring the building blocks of matter and making medical isotopes to new revelations about superconductors, nanomaterials, and biofuels, 2016 was a year of accomplishment at the U.S. Department of Energy's Brookhaven National Laboratory. Here are our Top-10 highlights.