Is this email not displaying correctly? View it in your browser.
 
Newswise - News for Journalists
Newswise Daily Wire
Thursday, November 29, 2018

Public Edition | newswise.com

Medical
(29 New)
Science
(18 New)
Life
(5 New)
Business
(0 New)
Marketplace
(0 New)
 

Medical News


Stuck in a loop of wrongness: Brain study shows roots of OCD

No one knows what drives people with obsessive-compulsive disorder to do what they do, even when they’re aware that they shouldn’t do it, and when it interferes with normal life. That lack of understanding means about half can’t find effective ...

– Michigan Medicine - University of Michigan

Biological Psychiatry; MH102242

Embargo expired on 29-Nov-2018 at 08:00 ET


Researchers Discover Why Some Parts of the Body Have Hair and Others Don’t

...

– Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania

Cell Reports; R37AR047709; P30AR057217; P30AR069589

Embargo expired on 28-Nov-2018 at 11:00 ET


Children Who Start School a Year Early More Likely to Be Diagnosed with ADHD, Study Shows

Children who enter elementary school younger than their peers are more likely to be diagnosed with ADHD. Children born in August in states with a Sept. 1 cutoff birth date for school enrollment have a 30 percent higher risk for ADHD diagnosis than...

– Harvard Medical School

NEJM

Embargo expired on 28-Nov-2018 at 17:00 ET


Cost and Weight-Loss Potential Matter Most to Bariatric Surgery Patients

New study at Michigan Medicine reveals the most commonly performed bariatric surgery, sleeve gastrectomy, doesn't fit the top qualities that surveyed patients want out of their weight loss journey.

– Michigan Medicine - University of Michigan

JAMA Surgery

Embargo expired on 28-Nov-2018 at 11:00 ET


Study Finds Biases in Widely Used Dementia Identification Tests

Quick tests used in primary care settings to identify whether people are likely to have dementia may often be wrong, according to a study published in the November 28, 2018, online issue of Neurology® Clinical Practice, an official journal of the Am...

– American Academy of Neurology (AAN)

Neurology® Clinical Practice

Embargo expired on 28-Nov-2018 at 16:00 ET


Mary Beth Claus Named Group Senior Vice President, Chief Legal Officer and General Counsel at NewYork-Presbyterian

NewYork-Presbyterian has named Mary Beth Claus group senior vice president, chief legal officer and general counsel, effective March 2019.

– New York-Presbyterian Hospital

Embargo expired on 29-Nov-2018 at 09:00 ET


Venetoclax Combination Approved for Elderly AML

A new option – a combination of a standard drug and the novel agent venetoclax – has been granted accelerated approval by the Food and Drug Administration for certain AML patients after a large, multicenter phase 1 clinical trial showed the combi...

– Dana-Farber Cancer Institute

Blood,Oct-2018


New Study Finds Racial Disparities in Oral Anticoagulant Use

Black patients with atrial fibrillation are significantly less likely to receive oral anticoagulants--particularly newer, more effective versions-- than white and Hispanic patients.

– Health Sciences at the University of Pittsburgh

JAMA Cardiology; Eliot B. and Edith C. Shoolman Fund of Massachusetts General Hospital; T32-HP10251


Umbilical cord blood cells studied for preserving brain function in infants with congenital diaphragm disease

A new clinical trial at The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston (UTHealth) is the first in the world to investigate whether infusing an infant’s own umbilical cord blood cells, or autologous cells, can protect the brain, mitigating...

– University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston


Brain Cancer Immunotherapy SurVaxM Extends Survival, Even in Hard-to-Treat Patients

The latest results from an ongoing clinical study incorporating the immunotherapy SurVaxM as part of combination treatment for glioblastoma show that this investigational drug is safe, well-tolerated and extended survival even among the hardest-to-tr...

– Roswell Park Comprehensive Cancer Center

SNO 2018 Annual Meeting


Fitbits go the distance in running study

La Trobe University researchers have put one of the world's most popular activity trackers to the test. Denise Jones, Joanne Kemp and colleagues from La Trobe Sports and Exercise Medicine tested the accuracy of the Fitbit Flex for recording steps ...

– La Trobe University

The International Journal of Sports Physical Therapy


Antibiotic could protect against neurodegenerative diseases during aging

An antibiotic, minocycline, can increase the lifespan of roundworms by preventing the build-up of proteins during aging, a study in the open-access journal eLife reports.

– eLife

eLife


Easy to use 3D bioprinting technique creates lifelike tissues from natural materials

Bioengineers have developed a 3D bioprinting technique that works with natural materials and is easy to use, allowing researchers of varying levels of technical expertise to create lifelike tissues, such as blood vessels and a vascularized gut. The g...

– University of California San Diego

Advanced Healthcare Materials, Oct-2018; 1013926; 5-FY15-450; SKF-16-150; 1463689; RO1GM123313; R01HG009285; RO1CA222826; R21CA217735; R01CA206880...

includes video


Re-Programming the Body’s Energy Pathway Boosts Kidney Self-Repair

A team of researchers led by Jonathan Stamler, MD, of Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine and University Hospitals Cleveland Medical Center, has discovered a pathway for enhancing the self-repair efforts of injured kidneys. The finding...

– Case Western Reserve University

Nature; NIH


Single cell sequencing sheds light on why cancers form in specific cell types

While many cells in our bodies can accumulate oncogenic mutations, the majority of these events do not lead to tumor formation as these abnormal cells are eliminated by defense mechanisms. Instead, tumors arise when a mutation happens in a particular...

– University of Illinois at Chicago

Nature Communications


Study Shows High Costs of Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder

Fetal alcohol spectrum disorder (FASD) is a common condition with a high economic impact in both children and adults, concludes an updated review in the Journal of Addiction Medicine, the official journal of the American Society of Addiction Medicine...

– Wolters Kluwer Health: Lippincott Williams and Wilkins

Journal of Addiction Medicine


Scientists solve longtime mystery in innate immunity

Scientists have long wondered how one protein, NLRP3, can promote inflammation in response to a wide range of seemingly unrelated stimuli.

– UT Southwestern Medical Center

Nature


FDA Approves New Targeted Drug for Leukemia Tested at University of Pennsylvania

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has approved the first ever inhibitor drug specifically approved for treating patients with relapsed or refractory acute myeloid leukemia (AML) with a mutation in the Fms-like tyrosine kinase 3 (FLT3) gene....

– Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania

The Lancet Oncology


UCLA research suggests widely used breast cancer therapy doesn’t cause cognitive decline

UCLA researchers have found that commonly used hormone therapies for women diagnosed with breast cancer do not appear to cause significant cognitive dysfunction following the treatment.

– University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA), Health Sciences

Cancer


Synthetic Cells Command New Powers of Communication

Researchers at UC San Diego used materials like clay and plastic to create synthetic cells—or “cell-mimics”—capable of gene expression and communication rivaling that of living cells. According to some scientists, these newly published resear...

– University of California San Diego

Nature Communications


The future of fighting cancer: zapping tumors in less than a second

New accelerator-based technology being developed by the Department of Energy’s SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory and Stanford University aims to reduce the side effects of cancer radiation therapy by shrinking its duration from minutes to under ...

– SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory

includes video


The Medical Minute: Understand the danger of concussions as winter sports begin

Youth winter sports are underway, and with a recent increase in national attention on the possible dangers of head trauma for athletes, it is important for coaches, parents and players to recognize symptoms of a concussion and also help lessen their ...

– Penn State Health


High-Tech Surgical Suites Let Doctors Scan Patients without Either Leaving the Operating Room

Inside Jacobs Medical Center at UC San Diego Health resides the only intra-operative magnetic resonance imaging surgical suites in Southern California — a high-tech hybrid that gives surgeons access to advanced MRI technology during procedures.

– University of California San Diego Health

includes video


Surgery for Epilepsy: Underused and Overhyped

Surgery can cure epilepsy, but it’s rarely used. In the United States, only about 1% of people with epilepsy will ever be evaluated for surgery, and fewer than that undergo it. At the same time, some centers oversell surgery, offering it to patient...

– International League Against Epilepsy

includes video


Penn State researchers develop new technology to advance ultrasound neuromodulation

Existing methods for recording and modulating neurons in the brain are either highly invasive or yield results with low spatiotemporal resolution. Mehdi Kiani, Dorothy Quiggle Assistant Professor of Electrical Engineering, is working to change that. ...

– Penn State College of Engineering


Diabetes and the Feet

Diabetes can cause problems with your feet. BIDMC's John Giurini, DPM, Chief of Podiatric Surgery, discusses these complications and how experts at BIDMC can help.

– Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center


What's Behind Flawless Skin? We Asked a Dermatologist

BIDMC's Alexa Kimball, MD, shares important factors that influence how our skin looks and behaves.

Expert Available

– Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center


Camden Institutions Partner to Research Genetic and Biological Factors to Fight Opioid Addiction

The Coriell Institute for Medical Research, Cooper University Health Care and Cooper Medical School of Rowan University (CMSRU) are launching the Camden Opioid Research Initiative (CORI), a first-of-its-kind undertaking to investigate the genetic and...

– Coriell Institute for Medical Research


OADN CEO Donna Meyer Appointed to American Red Cross National Nursing Committee

OADN CEO Donna Meyer Appointed to American Red Cross National Nursing Committee

– Organization for Associate Degree Nursing (OADN)

Science News


FIONA Measures the Mass Number of 2 Superheavy Elements: Moscovium and Nihonium

A Berkeley Lab-led team has directly measured the mass numbers of two superheavy elements: moscovium (element 115), and nihonium (element 113).

– Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Physical Review Letters, Nov. 28, 2018

Embargo expired on 28-Nov-2018 at 11:00 ET


Flexible electronic skin aids human-machine interactions (video)

Human skin contains sensitive nerve cells that detect pressure, temperature and other sensations that allow tactile interactions with the environment. To help robots and prosthetic devices attain these abilities, scientists are trying to develop elec...

– American Chemical Society (ACS)

ACS Applied Materials & Interfaces

includes video


Authenticating the geographic origin of hazelnuts

Hazelnuts, like olive oil, cheese and other agricultural products, differ in flavor depending on their geographic origin. Because consumers and processors are willing to pay more for better nuts — especially in fine chocolates and other delicacies ...

– American Chemical Society (ACS)

Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry


The Secret to Better Berries? Wild Bees

New research shows wild bees are essential for larger and better blueberry yields – with plumper, faster-ripening berries. The study is the first to show that wild bees improve not only blueberry quantity, but also quality. It finds they produce gr...

– University of Vermont

Agriculture, Ecosystems and Environment

includes video


Predators drive Nemo's relationship with an unlikely friend

Predators have been identified as the shaping force behind mutually beneficial relationships between species such as clownfish and anemones. The finding results from a University of Queensland and Deakin University-led study.

– University of Queensland

Ecology Letters


Swapping Bacteria May Help ‘Nemo’ Fish Cohabitate with Fish-Killing Anemones

The fish killer and the fish live in harmony: But how the clownfish thrive in the poisonous tentacles of the anemone remains a mystery. A new study tackles the iconic conundrum from the microbial side.

– Georgia Institute of Technology

Coral Reefs, Nov-2018; 346253

includes video


Innate fingerprint could detect tampered steel parts

Researchers using magnetic signals have found unique “fingerprints” on steel, which could help to verify weapons treaties and reduce the use of counterfeit bolts in the construction industry.

– Los Alamos National Laboratory

Smart Materials and Structures


New method automatically computes realistic movement with friction from 3D design

Simulating any 3D surface or structure--from tree leaves and garments to pages of a book--is a computationally challenging, time-consuming task. While various geometric tools are available to mimic the shape modeling of these surfaces, a new method i...

– Association for Computing Machinery (ACM)

ACM SIGGRAPH ASIA


Researchers visually track disease transmission, reveals previously unknown connections

The study, which was recently published in Nature, tracked how disease is spread by placing colored dust on hibernating bats to mimic how a fungal pathogen is transferred from one individual to another. Then, biologists found connections between how ...

– Northern Arizona University

Nature


International Experts Discuss the Future of the Digital Industry at the SUSU Conference

Russian and international engineers and researchers discussed digital manufacturing at 2018 Global Smart Industry Conference held November 13th-15th at South Ural State University (SUSU), reports the university press service to RIA Novosti.

– South Ural State University


Innovative Stroke Treatment Leads to Novel Patent Applications

A innovative agent that has been used for decades to treat alcohol-use disorder is showing real promise for the treatment of stroke and has resulted in a U.S. patent application for a neuroscientist at FAU. The researcher has also filed a patent appl...

– Florida Atlantic University


New Technology Consistently Identifies Proteins from a Dozen Cells

A new platform melding microfluidics and robotics allows more in-depth bioanalysis with fewer cells than ever before.

– Department of Energy, Office of Science

Nature Communications 9, 882 (2018). [DOI: 10.1038/s41467-018-03367-w]


Responders provide technical expertise in case of nuclear weapons accidents

Decades ago, technical experts from the national labs responded in an ad hoc manner to accidents involving nuclear weapons, called “broken arrows.” Thirty-two such accidents have occurred since the 1950s, so the Accident Response Group was creat...

– Sandia National Laboratories


Argonne Works to Preserve Birds, Aircraft and Cultural Heritage in South Korea

Argonne researchers discovered how to keep birds and pilots at a safe distance to avoid run-ins at air force bases.

– Argonne National Laboratory


Department of Energy to Provide $24 Million for Computer-Based Materials Design

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) announced plans to provide $24 million in new and renewal research awards to advance the development of sophisticated software for computer-based design of novel materials.

– Department of Energy, Office of Science


Three Los Alamos scientists named Fellows by AAAS

Los Alamos National Laboratory scientists Manvendra Dubey, David Janecky and Greg Swift were named Fellows of the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS). Election as a Fellow of AAAS is an honor bestowed upon Association members b...

– Los Alamos National Laboratory


UF/IFAS Event Combines Latest Citrus Varieties with New Breeding Research

Not only can growers learn the newest information, they’ll find out about approaches to commercializing new citrus varieties.

– University of Florida Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences


Seven UCI researchers named AAAS fellows

Seven University of California, Irvine researchers in areas ranging from engineering and chemistry to sociology and anthropology have been named fellows of the American Association for the Advancement of Science, the world’s largest general scienti...

– University of California, Irvine

Lifestyle & Social Sciences


Researchers Explore Division of Public Opinion on Black Lives Matter

Researchers at The University of Texas at Dallas recently examined public opinions about Black Lives Matter, an activist movement founded in 2013 that has gained national attention in subsequent years.

– University of Texas at Dallas

Justice Quarterly


Views of ideal female appearance in China are changing

Young women in China experiencing more personal independence, disposable income and exposure to Western media are also altering their views of female beauty. A new study looks into whether these factors are leading to eating disorders and weight and ...

– University of Delaware

Family and Consumer Sciences Research Journal


Sketchnoting pushes students to learn, retain information differently – particularly in STEM

Over the last three years, sketchnoting has been introduced to about 1,000 students, faculty and staff across a wide range of disciplines at Iowa State University. This fall, an interdisciplinary research team is studying how this alternative to trad...

– Iowa State University


Wiesen named new chair for Department of History

Nationally acclaimed history professor Jonathan Wiesen will join UAB in January 2019.

– University of Alabama at Birmingham


25th annual toy drive to brighten the lives of children in the Birmingham community

Holiday partnership between UAB Information Technology and UAB Libraries focuses on community giving and engagement through annual toy drive.

– University of Alabama at Birmingham

Tips

CUSTOMIZE YOUR FAVORITES WITH "MY READING LIST"

MY CHANNELS  |  SAVED ARTICLES  |  MY SOURCES  |  MY EXPERTS

MORE CHANNELS:
JOURNAL NEWS   |  TRENDS AND TOP STORIES   |  LOCAL NEWS  |  MEDICAL and SCIENTIFIC MEETINGS

Support
 Subscribe / Unsubscribe
 Edit My Preferences
 Comments / Suggestions
 Contact Us
 
Services
 Newswise Home
 Newswise Contact Directory
 Expert Queries
 Presspass Application

More News from:

 Harvard Medical School

 Department of Energy, Office of Science

 Michigan Medicine - University of Michigan

 Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

 American Academy of Neurology (AAN)

 SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory

 Health Sciences at the University of Pittsburgh

 Penn State Health

 West Virginia University

 University of California San Diego Health

 University of Queensland

 Georgia Institute of Technology

 La Trobe University

 Association for Computing Machinery (ACM)

 eLife

 Penn State College of Engineering

 University of Alabama at Birmingham

 PLOS

 Wolters Kluwer Health: Lippincott Williams and Wilkins

 UT Southwestern Medical Center

 University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA), Health Sciences

 University of Florida Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences


Subscribe / Unsubscribe
Edit my preferences

© 2018 Newswise, Inc. All Rights Reserved.

215 E. 5th St. SW, Charlottesville VA 22903 | 434-296-9417

 Contact Us