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Newswise LifeWire - Lifestyle and Social Science News for Journalists

Newswise LifeWire
Thursday, April 9, 2015

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Featured Story:

Don’t Farm on Me: Northern Europeans to Neolithic Interlopers

Northern Europeans in the Neolithic period initially rejected the practice of farming, which was otherwise spreading throughout the continent, a team... (more) (Embargo expired on 08-Apr-2015 at 14:00 ET)

– New York University

Featured Story:

Shakespeare Brand Identified in His First Poems

A printer’s ornament on the title pages of William Shakespeare's earliest works suggests that from an early stage in his career, the poet... (more)

– University of Texas at Austin (UT Austin)

Science News

08-Apr-2015

Trending Stories Report for 8 April 2015

Trending news releases with the most views in a single day. Topics include: Neurology, memory, pollution, astronomy, schizophrenia, stem cell research, children's health, and lung cancer

– Newswise Trends

07-Apr-2015

Trending Stories Report for 7 April 2015

Trending news releases with the most views in a single day. Topics include: education, children's health, autism, obesity, smoking, weight lose, LHC re-start, malaria, food safety, kidney disease, and avian flu.

– Newswise Trends

06-Apr-2015

Trending Stories Report for 6 April 2015

Trending news releases with the most views in a single day. Topics include: neurology, concussions, STEM jobs, Medical licensing, gun safety and youth, research ethics, and sleep apnea and blood pressure.

– Newswise Trends

Arts and Humanities

08-Apr-2015

Video: Microgreens

UF/IFAS Horticulturalist Bob Hochmuth says microgreens are a healthy and tasty crop you can grow in just two weeks.

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– University of Florida Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences

Obra de Teatro ‘Pelea’ con Asuntos de Familias Latinas y su Herencia Cultural

‘Luchadora’es una nueva obra teatral escrita por un miembro de la facultad de la Universidad de Wisconsin-Milwaukee (UWM), con raíces en Wisconsin y Texas.

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– University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee

Play Wrestles with Issues of Latino Family, Heritage and Culture

Play tells a Latino family's story -- from Texas to Milwaukee -- as a young girl explores the history behind a wrestling mask.

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– University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee

06-Apr-2015

Shakespeare Brand Identified in His First Poems

A printer’s ornament on the title pages of William Shakespeare's earliest works suggests that from an early stage in his career, the poet received significant support in fashioning a unique brand.

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Shakespeare Quarterly

– University of Texas at Austin (UT Austin)

Smithsonian Snapshot/Animated GIF: Cherry Blossom Flurry at Kambayashi Hot Spring

s a symbol of friendship, Japan gave cherry trees to Washington, D.C., where they encircle the Tidal Basin. Not far away are the Smithsonian’s Asian art museums, the Freer Gallery of Art and the Arthur M. Sackler Gallery. They hold many Japanese artworks that feature cherry blossoms, which Japanese poets have long associated with the transience and shortness of life. This Smithsonian Snapshot is an animated GIF of “Cherry Blossom Flurry at Kambayashi Hot Spring” from the Sackler Gallery.

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– Smithsonian Institution

Social and Behavioral Sciences

09-Apr-2015

A Grateful Heart Is a Healthier Heart

Recognizing and giving thanks for the positive aspects of life can result in improved mental, and ultimately physical, health in patients with asymptomatic heart failure, according to research published by the American Psychological Association.

(Embargo expired on 09-Apr-2015 at 09:00 ET)

Spirituality in Clinical Practice

– American Psychological Association (APA)

08-Apr-2015

Don’t Farm on Me: Northern Europeans to Neolithic Interlopers

Northern Europeans in the Neolithic period initially rejected the practice of farming, which was otherwise spreading throughout the continent, a team of researchers has found. Their findings offer a new wrinkle in the history of a major economic revolution that moved civilizations away from foraging and hunting as a means for survival.

Media embedded: Image(s) (Embargo expired on 08-Apr-2015 at 14:00 ET)

PLOS ONE

– New York University

Children with Autism Can Learn to Be Social, Trial Shows

A joint University of Kansas and University of Washington randomized trial shows that teachers and speech therapists can teach children with autism how to be social with their peers.

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Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders, 10.1007/s10803-014-2340-2

– University of Kansas, Life Span Institute

Don’t Blame Kids if They Do Not Enjoy School, Study Suggests

When children are unmotivated at school, new research suggests their genes may be part of the equation.

Personality and Individual Differences, July-2015

– Ohio State University

How Science and Storytelling Influence the Debate Over Vaccines

If there is a silver lining to the measles outbreaks, it’s that the risk of getting sick might lessen opposition to vaccines. Moving that pendulum will depend in part on how the public responds to news reports and personal stories about the illness.

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– Iowa State University

07-Apr-2015

Does a Person's Sense of Smell Reveal a Weight Bias?

Researchers discovered that visual cues associated with overweight or obese people can influence one’s sense of smell, and that the perceiver’s body mass index matters, too.

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International Journal of Obesity

– Swarthmore College

Subtle Discrimination Is Easier to Acknowledge When Self-Esteem Is High, According to New Study

Identifying discrimination is a necessary first step toward confronting and ultimately eliminating the stain of prejudice, yet victims may be unlikely to recognize some types of discrimination unless they have higher self-esteem.

Social Psychological and Personality Science

– University at Buffalo

Stereotypes Make Coming Out Trickier for Bisexuals

A new study by researchers at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln and Metropolitan State University in Denver shows that cultural perceptions and stereotypes can make it challenging for bisexuals to reveal their sexual orientation to friends and family.

Journal of Marriage and Family, March 2015

– University of Nebraska-Lincoln

MSU Archaeologist Helps Uncover Ancient ‘Spooning’ Couple in Greece

Almost 6,000 years ago, the man was placed behind the woman with his arms around her body, and their legs were intertwined. They were buried. Why they were interred in this manner is not yet determined, but the international team that discovered them in Greece is still searching for answers, according to team member Michael Galaty, a Mississippi State University archaeologist.

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Expert(s) available

– Mississippi State University

06-Apr-2015

Neighborhood Stigma Affects Online Transactions

The stigma associated with particular neighborhoods has a direct impact on economic transactions, a team of NYU sociologists has found. Their study shows that when sellers are seen as being from an economically disadvantaged neighborhood, they receive fewer responses to advertisements placed in online marketplaces.

(Embargo expired on 06-Apr-2015 at 15:00 ET)

Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

– New York University

Education

08-Apr-2015

Been There, Done That, Got the PhD

Hopkins Nursing PhDs share what they wish they had known with members of the next class

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– Johns Hopkins School of Nursing

Gonzaga Student Launches Free App to Take Ice-Bucket-Like Challenges to Next Level

The recent social media trend of challenging friends to dump buckets of ice over their heads for the ALS Association has inspired Gonzaga University senior Scott Alderson and his brother Matt, a Seattle University freshman. The brothers have developed an Apple app called 1Up Challenges to take such competitions to the next level.

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– Gonzaga University

07-Apr-2015

Scholar’s Contributions to Mathematics Education Continue to Multiply

Thousands of mathematics teachers and millions of students have used the curricular materials that Zalman Usiskin and his associates wrote and developed during his career as UChicago professor and director of the University of Chicago School Mathematics Project.

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– University of Chicago

Impact of Everyday Mathematics Continues to Grow

Wide-ranging impact has been a hallmark of the University of Chicago Mathematics Project and its most widely used product, Everyday Mathematics. Each year approximately 4.3 million students in 220,000 U.S. classrooms learn with Everyday Mathematics, a comprehensive pre-K through grade 6 mathematics program.

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– University of Chicago

06-Apr-2015

More Than a Promise: ISU 4U Aims to Offer More Than Financial Assistance

The promise of free tuition is a powerful incentive for students who otherwise could not afford a college education, but the director of ISU 4U says it's not enough if students are not prepared for college.

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– Iowa State University

Pop Culture

08-Apr-2015

Online Creep: Targeted Ads May Have Opposite Effect of Marketers’ Intent

A recent study suggests online advertisements that target users based on their web browsing habits and other personal information have a negative impact on the person’s intent to purchase the product. But the fact that users find this practice “creepy” runs counter to conventional wisdom among online marketing professionals.

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– Ithaca College

LifeWire Announcements

NYU Steinhardt Launches Bachelor of Arts in Education Studies

The NYU Steinhardt School of Culture, Education, and Human Development today announced the creation of a bachelor’s degree in education studies, and will enroll its first transfer students in the fall of 2015, and full class of undergraduates in the fall of 2016.

– New York University

University of the Sciences Brews New Certificate Program in Brewing Science

Good beer doesn’t happen by accident—it’s a science that participants in USciences’ first Brewing Science Certificate class will learn when it starts in the fall of 2015.

– University of the Sciences

LifeWire Higher Education Events

Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute Debuts Business Analytics Case Competition on April 8

The Lally School of Management and the Institute for Data Exploration and Applications (IDEA) at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute will host 20 teams at its inaugural Business Analytics Case Competition on April 8.

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– Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute (RPI)

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