Is this email not displaying correctly?
View it in your browser.
Newswise LifeWire - Lifestyle and Social Science News for Journalists

Newswise LifeWire
Thursday, May 14, 2015

Public Edition | newswise.com

Life
(29 New)
FacebookTwitterLinkedInStumbleupon

wisealerts…

NEWSWISE IS
MOBILE FRIENDLY

CLICK ON ANY STORY IN THE WIRE FROM YOUR MOBILE DEVICE AND SEE FOR YOURSELF!

Featured Story:

Bullying: What We Know Based on 40 Years of Research

A special issue of American Psychologist provides a comprehensive review of over 40 years of research on bullying among school age youth, documenting the current understanding of the complexity of the issue and suggesting directions for future... (more) (Embargo expired on 14-May-2015 at 09:00 ET)

– American Psychological Association (APA)

Featured Story:

Depression Intensifies Anger in Veterans with PTSD

The tendency for veterans with post-traumatic stress disorder to lash out in anger can be significantly amplified if they are also depressed, according to research published by the American Psychological Association. (more)

– American Psychological Association (APA)

Science News

13-May-2015

Trending Stories Report for 13 May 2015

Trending news releases with the most views in a single day. Topics include: Statin drugs and cancer, concussions, women in business, tracking ebola, precision medicine, nursing, Nepal earthquake, and Oak Ridge National Lab researchers working on LHC experiments.

– Newswise Trends

12-May-2015

Trending Stories Report for 12 May 2015

Trending news releases with the most views in a single day. Topics include: tick-borne disease, 3D printing, childhood cancer and obesity, nursing, low-back pain, brain cells, and fluid dynamics.

– Newswise Trends

11-May-2015

Trending Stories Report for 11 May 2015

Trending news releases with the most views in a single day. Topics include: vision research, DOE research, aging, mental health, children's health, cancer, tick-borne disease, and drone technology.

– Newswise Trends

Arts and Humanities

13-May-2015

Centers for Disease Control Uses ‘Zombie Apocalypse’ to Inspire Disaster Preparedness

In today’s pop culture, it is hard to beat the current zombie upsurge; from TV drama like “The Walking Dead” to movies such as “Resident Evil,” the devilish figures have invaded public consciousness. They are apparently popular in public relations, too, judging by the number of campaigns using zombie-related humor to generate buzz on social media platforms. But how successful are these PR strategies in the context of risk communication? A new study published in the National Communication Association’s Journal of Applied Communication Research reveals that the match between social media and humor may not be made in heaven, after all.

Journal of Applied Communication Research

– National Communication Association

Food Recovery Network at Binghamton University Fights Waste, Feeds Hungry

French fry casserole is just one of the many food options made available to the hungry in the Binghamton area thanks to the Food Recovery Network (FRN) at Binghamton University. The program, launched in spring 2014, takes unused food from the dining halls and distributes it to non-profits, where it is consumed — with gratitude — by hungry people in the community.

Expert(s) available

– Binghamton University, State University of New York

Social and Behavioral Sciences

14-May-2015

Bullying: What We Know Based on 40 Years of Research

A special issue of American Psychologist provides a comprehensive review of over 40 years of research on bullying among school age youth, documenting the current understanding of the complexity of the issue and suggesting directions for future research.

(Embargo expired on 14-May-2015 at 09:00 ET)

American Psychologist

– American Psychological Association (APA)

Empathy Is Related to Sexual Orientation

The study, led by Professor Simone Shamay-Tsoory of the University of Haifa found that, in addition to gender, differences in empathy between people is related to sexual preference and, therefore, this orientation is important when assessing differences in empathy among people

Expert(s) available

Brain Research

– University of Haifa

13-May-2015

Depression Intensifies Anger in Veterans with PTSD

The tendency for veterans with post-traumatic stress disorder to lash out in anger can be significantly amplified if they are also depressed, according to research published by the American Psychological Association.

Psychological Trauma: Theory Research, Practice and Policy

– American Psychological Association (APA)

When Flying, Taste Buds Prefer Savory Tomato

While examining how airplane noise affects the palate, Cornell University food scientists found umami-rich foods become your taste bud’s best buds.

Journal of Experimental Psychology: Human Perception and Performance

– Cornell University

Depression Intensifies Anger in Veterans with PTSD

The tendency for veterans with post-traumatic stress disorder to lash out in anger can be significantly amplified if they are also depressed, according to research led by Ray Novaco, UC Irvine professor of psychology & social behavior, and published this week by the American Psychological Association.

Psychological Trauma: Theory Research, Practice & Policy

– University of California, Irvine

12-May-2015

Baby Talk: Babies Prefer Listening to Their Own Kind

A McGill University/UQAM research team has discovered that 6-month-old infants appear to be much more interested in listening to other babies than they are in listening to adults. The researchers believe that an attraction to infant speech sounds may help to kick start and support the crucial processes involved in learning how to talk.

Media embedded: Image(s)

Developmental Science

– McGill University

Sexual Orientation, Gender Identity Linked to Eating Disorders

Transgender and non-transgender lesbian, gay and bisexual students are at greater risk for eating disorders, finds a new study from the Brown School at Washington University in St. Louis and Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis. The study used data from the American College Health Association–National College Health Assessment, a survey of 289,024 students from 223 U.S. universities. Researchers found that the rates of self-reported eating disorders were highest in transgender people. Heterosexual men had the lowest rates.

Media embedded: Image(s)

Journal of Adolescent Health, April 2015

– Washington University in St. Louis

Sociologists Assess Epidemic of Wage Theft in Massachusetts Residential Construction Industry

New research published by the University of Massachusetts Amherst Labor Center asserts how the illegal theft of workers’ wages, especially those of undocumented immigrant laborers, has reached epidemic levels in the residential construction industry in Massachusetts. In the working paper “The Epidemic of Wage Theft in Residential Construction in Massachusetts,” Tom Juravich, professor of sociology, with research assistants and co-authors Essie Ablavsky and Jake Williams, present three case studies examining the subcontractors for one of the nation’s largest homebuilding companies, regional drywall-hanging companies and affordable housing construction by a community development corporation.

Media embedded: Image(s)

– University of Massachusetts Amherst

11-May-2015

Toddlers Understand Sound They Make Influences Others, Research Shows

Confirming what many parents already know, researchers at Georgia State University and the University of Washington have discovered that toddlers, especially those with siblings, understand how the sounds they make affect people around them.

Media embedded: Video

Journal of Cognition and Development, May 2015

– Georgia State University

Children Exposed to Multiple Languages May Be Better Natural Communicators

Young children who hear more than one language spoken at home become better communicators, a new study from University of Chicago psychologists finds.

Psychological Science

– University of Chicago

Study of Young Adults Aging Out of Foster Care and Juvenile Justice Custody

Study shows boost to positive outcomes for young adults aging out of foster care and the juvenile justice system. A large, rigorous study shows Youth Villages Program increases economic well-being and reduces homelessness for young adults.

– University of Chicago

Education

13-May-2015

Researchers Urge Caution in Using Measures of Students’ "Non-Cognitive" Skills for Teacher Evaluation, School Accountability, or Student Diagnosis

Policymakers and practitioners have grown increasingly interested in measures of personal qualities other than cognitive ability—including self-control, grit, growth mindset, gratitude, purpose, emotional intelligence, and other beneficial personal qualities—that lead to student success. However, they need to move cautiously before using existing measures to evaluate educators, programs, and policies, or diagnosing children as having “non-cognitive” deficits, according to a review by Angela L. Duckworth and David Scott Yeager published in Educational Researcher, a peer-reviewed journal of the American Educational Research Association.

Educational Researcher

– American Educational Research Association (AERA)

Texas Tech a Pioneer in Using Snapchat for Recruiting

For the first time, Texas Tech turned to Snapchat to help admitted students feel connected to the university and encourage them to attend in the fall.

Media embedded: Image(s)

– Texas Tech University

12-May-2015

Training Teachers for Deaf Children Gets a Robotic Helping Hand

Deaf education lecturers at The University of Manchester are using the Swivl robot in school classrooms in a UK first for teacher training.

Media embedded: Image(s)

– University of Manchester

Law and Public Policy

13-May-2015

Chicago Area Has Most Local Governments of All U.S. Metros

In a report published in the May edition of the Urban Affairs Review, the researchers introduced a "fragmentation index" comparing 51 U.S. metro regions of at least one million residents. The index is intended as a tool for further research, the report's authors said.

Media embedded: Image(s)

Urban Affairs Review

– University of Illinois at Chicago

11-May-2015

American Electorate Skeptical of Every 2016 Candidate, New GW Battleground Poll Shows

Americans’ pessimism about the current state of the country extends to the field of candidates for the 2016 presidential race, according to a new George Washington University Battleground Poll.

– George Washington University

New Research Finds “Coolness” Motivates Young Suburban Drug Dealers Who Quit to Avoid Problems

Young, white suburban drug dealers and stereotypical urban dealers are motivated to sell drugs for the same reason – to be “cool,” but when suburban dealers are exposed to extreme violence or serious legal consequences they are more likely to quit, according to a new book by criminologists at Georgia State University.

– Georgia State University

LifeWire Announcements

New Prizes Will Recognize and Reward Transparency in Social Science Research

To encourage openness in research and the teaching of best practices in social science, the Berkeley Initiative for Transparency in the Social Sciences (BITSS) announces that entries are being accepted for the new Leamer-Rosenthal Prizes for Open Social Science. BITSS is an initiative of the Center for Effective Global Action (CEGA) at the University of California, Berkeley.

Media embedded: Image(s)

– Berkeley Initiative for Transparency in the Social Sciences

Leading Liberal Arts Institutions Announce New Consortium for Online Teaching and Learning

Wellesley, Colgate University, Davidson College, and Hamilton College gathered Monday to announce the formation of a new consortium promoting joint educational and technological collaboration with a focus on online teaching and learning in the liberal arts.

Media embedded: Image(s)

– Wellesley College

Six Washington College Seniors Are Finalists for $62,900 Sophie Kerr Prize

Thanks to benefactor Sophie Kerr, a successful novelist and magazine editor in early 20th century New York, one student will take home the largest student literary prize in the nation.

Media embedded: Video / Image(s)

– Washington College

Journal of Nutrition Education and Behavior Presents a Pre-conference Level 1 Training: Introduction of Qualitative Methods on Saturday, July 25

Through a series of interactive lessons and practice sessions, participants will receive introductory training in conducting qualitative research.

– Society for Nutrition Education and Behavior

Roger Daltrey Announces New National Ambassadors For Teen Cancer America: The Band Perry

Roger Daltrey, a passionate advocate for teens and young adults with cancer, announced Monday that Kimberly, Reid and Neil Perry of the Grammy Award-winning trio The Band Perry will serve as one of Teen Cancer America’s national ambassadors. The announcement was made in a press conference prior to The Who’s Nashville show at the Bridgestone Arena.

Media embedded: Image(s)

– PR Pacific

Merger of Clarkson University & Union Graduate College Moves Forward Following Unanimous Approval from Trustees

The merger of Union Graduate College into Clarkson University has received unanimous approval from the boards of trustees of each institution this week.

– Clarkson University

LifeWire Higher Education Events

Commencement 2015: Resilience and Strength in Business and Management

Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute business students and alumni and alumnae at the Lally School of Management are transforming the world every day. Two Lally students from the graduating Class of 2015, Chloe Hutchinson and Steven Moretti, are highlighted. They represent some of the many dedicated Rensselaer students who want to answer the challenges of a rapidly changing global economy, whether as innovative decision makers in existing companies, or as self-propelled entrepreneurs.

Media embedded: Image(s)

– Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute (RPI)

Missionary, Ebola Survivor and Indiana University Alum Challenges Medical School Grads to Remain True to Their Purpose

Medical missionary and Indiana University School of Medicine alumnus Dr. Kent Brantly challenged 2015 graduates to remain true to their calling during his May 9 commencement address.

Media embedded: Image(s)

– Indiana University

Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai Honors Leaders in Law, Information Technology, Medical Research and Health Care Reform

A Justice of the U.S. Supreme Court, a pioneer in health care information technology, an ethics expert who influenced national health policy, and a Nobel Prize-winning neurologist were honored at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai’s 46th annual commencement ceremony at Avery Fisher Hall at Lincoln Center on May 8th, 2015.

– Mount Sinai Medical Center

LifeWire Marketplace

AACN Selects Leading Consulting Firm to Investigate Ways to Maximize Nursing’s Contribution in Academic Health Centers

AACN is pleased to announce that Manatt Health Solutions, the interdisciplinary policy and business advisory division of Manatt, Phelps & Phillips, LLP, has been selected to conduct a national survey and assessment on how to best position nursing schools to thrive within academic health centers (AHCs).

– American Association of Colleges of Nursing (AACN)

subscribe/unsubscribe :: edit my preferences
© 2015 Newswise, Inc. All Rights Reserved. | 215 E. 5th St. SW, Charlottesville VA 22903 | 434-296-9417 | Contact Us