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Newswise LifeWire - Lifestyle and Social Science News for Journalists

Newswise LifeWire
Thursday, July 23, 2015

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Featured Story:

Poverty’s Most Insidious Damage Is to a Child’s Brain

A new study, published July 20 in JAMA Pediatrics, provides even more compelling evidence that growing up in poverty has detrimental effects on the... (more) (Embargo expired on 20-Jul-2015 at 11:00 ET)

– Washington University in St. Louis

Featured Story:

​Sex and Violence May Not Really Sell Products

If there’s one thing advertisers think they know, it is that sex and violence sell. A new analysis, however, provides some of the best evidence to date that this widely accepted adage just isn’t true. (more)

– Ohio State University

Science News

22-Jul-2015

New Target to Treat Depression, Sound Waves to Combat Tumors, and Improving Blood Vessels with Age, Top Stories 22 July 2015

Other topics include nursing research, treating hep C and HIV, and more

– Newswise Trends

21-Jul-2015

Poverty and Child Development, Race and Heart Health, Pot to Treat Pain, and More Top Stories 21 July 2015

Other topics include genetics to predict prostate cancer, Facebook and body image, bioengineered immune cell response, and more...

– Newswise Trends

20-Jul-2015

Newswise Staff Picks

The best news, curated by Newswise editors

– Newswise Recommends

Social and Behavioral Sciences

22-Jul-2015

Apartment Owners See Benefits to Going Smoke-Free

A survey of 324 multiunit owners/operators in South Dakota showed that adopting those policies reduced maintenance costs while improving safety. The research was a collaborative project involving nursing researchers at South Dakota State University and the South Dakota Department of Health. State tobacco control officials have developed materials to help more apartment owners institute voluntary smoke-free policies.

Media embedded: Image(s)
Expert(s) available

– South Dakota State University

21-Jul-2015

Do Sex and Violence Sell? Maybe Not, Says New Study

Advertisers hoping to sway consumers might want to rethink running spots within media with violent or sexual themes, and might do better if the ads themselves have a G-rating, according to a study published by the American Psychological Association. Instead, violent and sexual media content may impair advertising’s effectiveness and ultimately deter purchasing, the research found.

(Embargo expired on 21-Jul-2015 at 09:00 ET)

Psychological Bulletin

– American Psychological Association (APA)

​Sex and Violence May Not Really Sell Products

If there’s one thing advertisers think they know, it is that sex and violence sell. A new analysis, however, provides some of the best evidence to date that this widely accepted adage just isn’t true.

Psychological Bulletin

– Ohio State University

News Today Tips the Scales Tomorrow

What’s in the newspaper today can predict how skinny or fat a country’s population will be tomorrow, says new research published in BMC Public Health.

BMC Public Health

– Cornell University

20-Jul-2015

Poverty’s Most Insidious Damage Is to a Child’s Brain

A new study, published July 20 in JAMA Pediatrics, provides even more compelling evidence that growing up in poverty has detrimental effects on the brain. In an accompanying editorial, child psychiatrist Joan L. Luby, MD, at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis, writes that “early childhood interventions to support a nurturing environment for these children must now become our top public health priority for the good of all.”

Media embedded: Image(s) (Embargo expired on 20-Jul-2015 at 11:00 ET)
Expert(s) available

JAMA Pediatrics, July 20, 2015

– Washington University in St. Louis

New Adolescent Friendship Study Confirms 'Birds of a Feather Flock Together - Stay Together'

No one likes to lose a friend, especially adolescents. Adolescent friendships are fleeting. The majority dissolve after a year or two. But why do friendships end? Researchers sought to answer this question by examining whether adolescent friendships end because of undesirable characteristics of friends, because of differences between friends, or both. They tracked friendships over six years, measuring the effect of both dissimilarities and undesirable individual attributes in predicting when an adolescent friendship would end.

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Psychological Science

– Florida Atlantic University

Anti-bias Trainings Not Effective for Many

Most anti-bias trainings probably won’t be as effective as organizers hope, according to a study just published in the Journal of Experimental Social Psychology. The research finds that only those whites who are aware of their racial biases will internalize negative feedback about their racial preferences and take steps to correct their behavior.

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Journal of Experimental Social Psychology

– University of Vermont

Study: The Angelina Jolie Effect on Breast Cancer Screening

Angelina Jolie received widespread media attention in 2013 when she told the public that she’d tested positive for BRCA1, a gene associated with an increased risk of breast cancer, and subsequently had a double mastectomy. Now research shows this publicity did influence some women’s intentions to seek similar testing.

Journal of Health Communication, DOI: 10.1080/10810730.2015.1064498

– North Carolina State University

Education

22-Jul-2015

Medical School Mission Statements May Influence Graduate Student Outcomes

Medical schools whose mission statements underscore societal good are more likely to produce physicians who will enter careers in primary care and work in medically underserved areas.

Family Medicine, June 2015

– SUNY Upstate Medical University

Pop Culture

20-Jul-2015

Clutter in Its New Form: ‘Digital Debris’ Is Spilling Over into the Physical, Says Baylor Design Historian

When it comes to clutter, the technological is increasingly crossing over into physical space, says a Baylor University interior design expert.

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– Baylor University

LifeWire Announcements

Journal of Health and Social Behavior to Publish Corrected Version of Study

The authors of a March 2015 Journal of Health and Social Behavior (JHSB) study, “In Sickness and in Health? Physical Illness as a Risk Factor for Marital Dissolution in Later Life” (2015, 56(1):59-73), have retracted the article.

Journal of Health and Social Behavior, Sept-2015

– American Sociological Association (ASA)

LifeWire Higher Education Events

Angioma Alliance 2015 Family Conference

The weekend begins with a reception on Friday evening and includes a full day of presentations and discussion groups on Saturday and a half day on Sunday. Our featured speaker will be Dr. Issam Awad, Chair of the Angioma Alliance Scientific Advisory Board. There will be panel discussions on rehabilitation and on coping/self-care. We will have a separate program for children and teens. Please check our website at www.angioma.org/pages.aspx?content=447 for full conference details.

– University of Chicago Medical Center

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