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Newswise LifeWire - Lifestyle and Social Science News for Journalists

Newswise LifeWire
Thursday, January 7, 2016

Public Edition | newswise.com

Life
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Featured Story:

Why White, Older Men Are More Likely to Die of Suicide

An important factor in white men’s psychological brittleness and vulnerability to suicide once they reach late life may be dominant scripts of... (more)

– Colorado State University

Featured Story:

During Great Recession Employees Drank Less on the Job, but More Afterwards

A new study from the University at Buffalo Research Institute on Addictions explores the effects of the Great Recession of 2007-09 on alcohol use among people who remained employed. (more)

– University at Buffalo

Arts and Humanities

06-Jan-2016

University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee Libraries Unveil ‘Paramount’ Music, History Collection

The University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee Libraries now has two limited edition collections of rare early jazz and blues music from Paramount Music in nearby Grafton, Wisconsin.

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– University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee

Social and Behavioral Sciences

06-Jan-2016

Money Affects Children's Behavior, Even if They Don't Understand Its Value

The act of handling money makes young children work harder and give less, according to new research published by the University of Minnesota's Carlson School of Management and University of Illinois at Chicago. The effect was observed in children who lacked concrete knowledge of money's purpose, and persisted despite the denomination of the money.

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Psychological Science

– University of Minnesota

Teen Speed Skaters, Nutrition Students Partner for Performance

Nutritional sciences students at the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee help Olympic hopeful speed skaters develop healthy eating habits that can help fuel their performance.

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– University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee

What Less Time on Social Media Means for Relationships in 2016

For all those who resolve to spend less time on social media in 2016, here is what that means, say experts from Purdue University.

Expert(s) available

– Purdue University

05-Jan-2016

Some Consumers Use ‘Servant’ Brands to Gain Sense of Power, Johns Hopkins Study Finds

A recent study states that some consumers ― materialists who strongly link possessions to happiness and who tend to have poor personal relationships ― regard anthropomorphized popular products as servants over which they can assert power and gain control that they otherwise lack in their lives.

Journal of Consumer Research

– Johns Hopkins University Carey Business School

Why White, Older Men Are More Likely to Die of Suicide

An important factor in white men’s psychological brittleness and vulnerability to suicide once they reach late life may be dominant scripts of masculinity, aging and suicide, a Colorado State University psychology researcher says.

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Men and Masculinities

– Colorado State University

Put the Cellphone Away! Fragmented Baby Care Can Affect Brain Development

Mothers, put down your smartphones when caring for your babies! That’s the message from University of California, Irvine researchers, who have found that fragmented and chaotic maternal care can disrupt proper brain development, which can lead to emotional disorders later in life.

Translational Psychiatry, Jan-2016

– University of California, Irvine

Study: We Trust in Those Who Believe in God

It's political season and there's one thing you're sure to hear a lot about from candidates vying for support--religion. Talking directly or subtly about religion has become part of the American way in political campaigns.

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American Politics Research

– University of Houston

During Great Recession Employees Drank Less on the Job, but More Afterwards

A new study from the University at Buffalo Research Institute on Addictions explores the effects of the Great Recession of 2007-09 on alcohol use among people who remained employed.

Psychology of Addictive Behaviors

– University at Buffalo

Community Partnerships Link Latin America to Milwaukee

Milwaukee and Wisconsin community members learn more about Latino culture with the help of the UW-Milwaukee Center for Latin American and Caribbean Studies.

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– University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee

Sociologist Available to Discuss Antigovernment Protest in Oregon

The American Sociological Association (ASA) has a sociologist available to discuss the situation in Oregon involving armed antigovernment protesters.

Expert(s) available

– American Sociological Association (ASA)

04-Jan-2016

Self-Esteem Gender Gap More Pronounced in Western Nations

People worldwide tend to gain self-esteem as they grow older, and men generally have higher levels of self-esteem than women, but this self-esteem gender gap is more pronounced in Western industrialized countries, according to research published by the American Psychological Association.

Journal of Personality and Social Psychology

– American Psychological Association (APA)

Reprogramming Social Behavior in Carpenter Ants Using Epigenetic Drugs

A Penn-led team found that ant caste behavior can be reprogrammed, indicating that an individual’s epigenetic, not genetic, makeup determines roles in ant colonies.

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Science; T32HD083185; DP2MH107055

– Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania

Education

06-Jan-2016

Is Your Toddler Ready for Reading Lessons?

Even before they can read, children as young as 3 years of age are beginning to understand how a written word is different than a simple drawing — a nuance that could provide an important early indicator for children who may need extra help with reading lessons, suggests new research from Washington University in St.

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Child Development; NICHD Grant HD051610 ; NSF Grant BCS-1421279

– Washington University in St. Louis

Educators Honored for Teaching “The Science Behind Cleaning”

Two Purdue University Extension educators were honored by the American Cleaning Institute® (ACI) for helping consumers learn the science behind cleaning products.

– American Cleaning Institute

05-Jan-2016

Service-Learning Courses Can Positively Impact Post-Graduate Salaries

Service-learning experiences in college can reach beyond the classroom—and help grow graduates’ bank accounts once they enter the workforce, according to a recent University of Georgia study.

International Journal of Research on Service-Learning and Community Engagement

– University of Georgia

Students with Influence Over Peers Reduce School Bullying by 30 Percent

Curbing school bullying has been a focal point for educators, administrators, policymakers and parents, but the answer may not lie within rules set by adults, according to new research led by Princeton University. Instead, the solution might actually be to have the students themselves, particularly those most connected to their peers, promote conflict resolution in school.

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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

– Princeton University

04-Jan-2016

Developing Inclusive Community Means Embracing Diversity

“Diversity and inclusion are not just about ethnicity,” said assistant education professor Christine Nganga, citing gender, abilities and disabilities, social and economic class and religion in addition to race. “It’s the interplay of all these markers and how to cater to students’ diverse needs in the classroom.” She has quadrupled the enrollment in the ESL certification program at South Dakota State University and emphasizes social justice, equity and inclusion in her scholarly work.

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Expert(s) available

Developing a Mentoring Network in Formal and informal mentoring in multiple contexts; American Educational Research Association, April 2015; University Council of Educational Admin. Nov. 2012...

– South Dakota State University

Pop Culture

06-Jan-2016

Billings: Regardless of How States Define 'Gambling,' Fantasy Sports Games More Skill Than Luck

There are gray areas when trying to classify daily sports fantasy contests as games of skill or luck, but the unique attributes of repetitions and permutations, despite the quick payouts, make fantasy sports games of skill.

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Expert(s) available

– University of Alabama

Law and Public Policy

06-Jan-2016

Iowa State University Experts to Discuss 2016 Iowa Caucuses and Issues

The following is a list of Iowa State University experts available to comment on issues and candidates for the 2016 caucuses and presidential election.

Expert(s) available

– Iowa State University

05-Jan-2016

Case Western Reserve University School of Law Establishes Concurrent Degree Program in China

A concurrent degree program will allow Case Western Reserve University law students to complete their third year in China, while simultaneously earning an LLM (Master of Laws) degree in Chinese Law at Zhejiang University - Guanghua Law School and a JD from CWRU School of Law. The program also permits qualified students in their fourth year of Guanghua Law School to spend an entire academic year at CWRU School of Law in studies for the LLM in U.S. and Global Legal Studies.

– Case Western Reserve University

04-Jan-2016

Law Professor Files Brief with Supreme Court for Families of Dead in 1983 Marine Barracks Bombing in Lebanon

Jimmy Gurulé, professor of law in the University of Notre Dame Law School, with six other law professors, has filed an amici curiae, or friends of the court brief, on behalf of the families of the 241 U.S. servicemen killed in the 1983 truck-bombing attack on a Marine barracks in Beirut.

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Expert(s) available

– University of Notre Dame

LifeWire Policy and Public Affairs

Opinion: Gun Violence Is Also a Public Health Problem

Physicians voice their opinion that gun violence is also a public health issue, and provide reasons to look at gun violence through a public health perspective.

– Pennsylvania Medical Society

APA Welcomes Administration’s Gun Control Measures

The American Psychological Association expressed strong support for key components of President Obama’s plan to protect American children and communities by reducing gun violence.

– American Psychological Association (APA)

LifeWire Announcements

American Geophysical Union and Council on Undergraduate Research Partner to Advance Undergraduate Science Education

American Geophysical Union and Council on Undergraduate Research Partner to Advance Undergraduate Science Education

– Council on Undergraduate Research (CUR)

Baylor’s Truett Seminary Receives a $600,000 Grant to Establish Youth Spirituality and Sports Institute

Baylor University’s George W. Truett Theological Seminary has received a $600,000 grant from Lilly Endowment Inc. to establish the Youth Spirituality and Sports Institute: Running the Race Well (RRW). This new institute is part of Lilly Endowment’s High School Youth Theology Institutes initiative.

– Baylor University

Screening of A Brilliant Young Mind Kicks Off MAA’s Math Competition Campaign

The Mathematical Association of America (MAA), with support from Sony Pictures Home Entertainment, presents an exclusive screening of A Brilliant Young Mind, to kick off the MAA’s campaign, “Wanted: Brilliant Young Minds,” to promote awareness of MAA-sponsored mathematical competitions for students nationwide. The screening event will take place at the AMC Pacific Place Cinema in Seattle, Washington on January 7, 2016.

– Mathematical Association of America

New Book Presents Personal Finance Advice in 10 Simple Rules

An index card containing personal finance advice that went viral online has inspired a new book by Prof. Harold Pollack and financial journalist Helaine Olen. Titled The Index Card: Why Personal Finance Doesn’t Have to be Complicated, the book will go on sale Jan. 5.

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– University of Chicago

LifeWire Higher Education Events

Albright Institute at Wellesley College Brings Together World Leaders on Economic Development for Public Dialogue on Global Inequality

Several of the world’s most influential leaders in global economic policy will take part in a public dialogue, entitled “Addressing Global Inequality,” on January 31, 2016, at Wellesley College’s Madeleine Korbel Albright Institute for Global Affairs. The event will feature Christine Lagarde, managing director of the International Monetary Fund; Sri Mulyani Indrawati, managing director and chief operating officer of the World Bank; and Mark Malloch-Brown, former deputy secretary general and chief of staff for the United Nations. Former U.S. Secretary of State Madeleine Albright ’59, a Wellesley alumna who founded the Institute, will also take part in the public dialogue. This year’s Institute addresses the complicated issues related to global inequality.

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– Wellesley College

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