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Newswise LifeWire - Lifestyle and Social Science News for Journalists

Newswise LifeWire
Monday, February 29, 2016

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Featured Story:

Study Finds Consistent Link Between Violent Crime and Concealed-Carry Gun Permits

The first study to find a significant relationship between firearm crime and subsequent applications for, and issuance of, concealed-carry gun permits has been published in the Journal of Interpersonal Violence. (more)

– Indiana University

Featured Story:

Childhood Poverty, Parental Abuse Cost Adults Their Health for Years to Come

Growing up in poverty or being abused by parents can lead to accumulated health problems later in life, according to research from Purdue University. (more)

– American Sociological Association (ASA)

Arts and Humanities

26-Feb-2016

Archivists Work to Preserve Obsolete Recordings

For decades, an old Webster-Chicago Electronic Memory recorder led a surprisingly anonymous existence in a corner of the University of Alaska Fairbanks Rasmuson Library archives.

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– University of Alaska Fairbanks

25-Feb-2016

UNH Historian Pens Book on Women’s Quest for the American Presidency

In “The Highest Glass Ceiling: Women’s Quest for the American Presidency,” Ellen Fitzpatrick, professor of history at the University of New Hampshire, has written a book that gives context to Hillary Clinton's current race for the White House and shows how her quest is part of a longer journey for women in the United States. As “The Highest Glass Ceiling” reveals, women’s pursuit of the Oval Office, then and now, has involved myriad forms of influence, opposition and intrigue.

Expert(s) available

– University of New Hampshire

Social and Behavioral Sciences

29-Feb-2016

Ballooning 10 Billion World Population Drives Moderate-to-High Worries, Study Finds

Risk analysts have gathered new evidence that the public sees a medium-to-high risk that worldwide population growth could lead to food and water shortages, species extinctions, and other disasters, pointing to the likelihood that concerned individuals might support policies to slow the growth.

– Society for Risk Analysis (SRA)

Childhood Poverty, Parental Abuse Cost Adults Their Health for Years to Come

Growing up in poverty or being abused by parents can lead to accumulated health problems later in life, according to research from Purdue University.

American Sociological Review, Feb-2016

– American Sociological Association (ASA)

26-Feb-2016

Transgender Children Supported in Their Identities Show Positive Mental Health

A new study from the University of Washington, believed to be the first to look at the mental health of transgender children who have “socially transitioned,” finds that they had rates of depression and anxiety no higher than two control groups of children. The findings challenge long-held assumptions that mental health problems in transgender children are inevitable, or even that being transgender is itself a type of mental disorder.

(Embargo expired on 26-Feb-2016 at 00:00 ET)

Pediatrics; K01-MH092526

– University of Washington

Birds Who Sing Together, Stay Together

The courtship and mating behaviors of the perky Australian red-backed fairy-wren have evolved into nothing short of a free-for-all. The rampant promiscuity of both sexes is legendary. What’s a fairy-wren to do to keep from wasting energy raising another male’s chicks? New research from scientists at the Cornell University Lab of Ornithology provides a surprising answer: Sing with your mate.

Media embedded: Video / Image(s)

Journal Biology Letters, Feb-2016

– Cornell University

Why People Oppose Same-Sex Marriage

Why do opponents of same-sex marriage really oppose it? A UCLA psychology study published online today in the journal Psychological Science concludes that many people believe gay men and women are more sexually promiscuous than heterosexuals, which they may fear could threaten their own marriages and their way of life.

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Psychological Science

– University of California Los Angeles UCLA

25-Feb-2016

People in Food Deserts Eat Much Differently Than the Rest of America

A new study from Georgia Tech identifies the food choices and nutritional profiles of people living in America's food deserts. People with less access to grocery stores eat food that is 5 to 17 percent higher in fat, cholesterol and sugars compared to those shared in non-food deserts areas.

– Georgia Institute of Technology

University of Kentucky Researcher Helps Draft "Historic" Position Statement of Nutrition in Athletes

Three organizations have released a joint position statement representing evidence-based opinions on nutrition factors that influence athletic performance and emerging trends in sports nutrition.

– University of Kentucky

Who(What)’s Driving and When?

Advancing the state of knowledge about human factors aspects of autonomous passenger vehicles are two studies published recently in Human Factors: The Journal of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society. One assesses the level of drivers’ trust in the autonomous car. The other suggests that drivers will respond best to verbal prompts alerting them to driving conditions and the state of the vehicle.

The Journal of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society

– Human Factors and Ergonomics Society

People Stay True to Moral Colors, Studies Find

When judging the character of a friend, co-worker or potential romantic partner, pay attention to little acts of kindness or cruelty because these are likely part of a consistent behavioral pattern, suggests new research from Washington University in St. Louis.

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Journal of Research in Personality

– Washington University in St. Louis

Education

25-Feb-2016

Mississippi Now Requires Nutritious Snacks in Schools

The Mississippi Department of Education voted on Thursday, February 18, 2016 to adopt Smart Snack standards, ensuring all public school students have healthy options beyond what is provided in the School Meal Program.

Media embedded: Video

– Voices for Healthy Kids

Pop Culture

25-Feb-2016

Hollywood Diversity Report: Mounting Evidence That More Diverse Casts Help the Bottom Line

UCLA’s Bunche Center finds that earnings and social media traffic are higher for content with more women and minority actors.

Media embedded: Video / Image(s)

– University of California Los Angeles UCLA

Law and Public Policy

29-Feb-2016

Study Finds Consistent Link Between Violent Crime and Concealed-Carry Gun Permits

The first study to find a significant relationship between firearm crime and subsequent applications for, and issuance of, concealed-carry gun permits has been published in the Journal of Interpersonal Violence.

Firearm Violence and Effects on Concealed Gun Carrying: Large Debate and Small Effects; Journal of Interpersonal Violence

– Indiana University

No Reputational Penalty for CEOs on Environment Lawsuits

Chief executives whose companies are embroiled in lawsuits over serious environmental or intellectual property issues either experience no reputational damage or – quite the reverse – find themselves better off, according to research from the University of Adelaide.

Journal of Contemporary Accounting & Economics

– University of Adelaide

Stop-and-Frisk, Plainclothes Policing in Poor, Minority Communities Part of Problem in Police Shootings, Analysis Shows

A Georgia State University assistant professor of law found relationships between stop-and-frisk, plainclothes policing and other tactics used in predominantly poor and minority communities with incidents of police shootings of civilians.

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Georgia State University College of Law, Legal Studies Research Paper, Jan-2016

– Georgia State University

Ruth Bader Ginsburg: The Former Rutgers Law Professor Led the Legal Campaign for Gender Equality

She recognized discriminatory laws hurt women – and men – and sought to revamp them one case at a time.

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– Rutgers University

25-Feb-2016

UCI Launches Research Institute Devoted to Effectiveness of Antipoverty Programs

Research on the long-term effectiveness of poverty alleviation programs in the U.S. is the focus of a new, $1.3 million institute at the University of California, Irvine. Launched Jan. 1, the Economic Self-Sufficiency Policy Research Institute is led by Chancellor’s Professor of Economics David Neumark, who has directed UCI’s Center for Economics & Public Policy since 2011.

– University of California, Irvine

Justice Scalia’s Death Highlights Importance of Persuasive, Informative and Accessible Legal Writing

In this Q&A, Baylor Law School professors discuss Justice Scalia and the importance and power of persuasive and informative writing in today’s legal process.

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Expert(s) available

– Baylor University

LifeWire Policy and Public Affairs

BU Researchers Welcome Obama’s Final Budget Proposals

Plan calls for more cancer, cybersecurity, sustainable energy funding in 2017.

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– Boston University

LifeWire Announcements

Grant Expands History Project of HIV-Positive Women

The University of Illinois at Chicago has received a MAC AIDS Fund grant in support of "I'm Still Surviving," an oral history project featuring women’s personal histories of living with HIV and AIDS in the United States.

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– University of Illinois at Chicago

Promising Young Scientists Receive Prestigious Career Award

Northwestern University research scientists Anne Marie Piper and Brenna Argall have received the prestigious Faculty Early Career Development (CAREER) Award from the National Science Foundation.

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– Northwestern University

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