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Newswise LifeWire - Lifestyle and Social Science News for Journalists

Newswise LifeWire
Monday, April 18, 2016

Public Edition | newswise.com

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Featured Story:

A Shot in the Dark: New Surveillance Tool Called ShotSpotter Tracks and Records Incidents of Gunfire

When gunfire is heard and unreported, what does it reveal about the state of crime in America? The University of Virginia’s Jennifer Doleac is... (more)

– University of Virginia

Featured Story:

Mexico’s First Real Attempt to Legalize Cannabis

In this opinion piece, Fernanda Alonso, an Associate at the O'Neill Institute for National and Global Health Law at Georgetown University, discusses... (more)

– O'Neill Institute for National & Global Health Law

Arts and Humanities

14-Apr-2016

History Professor Lisa Leff Wins Major Jewish Literature Prize

American University History Professor Lisa Leff is the recipient of the 2016 Sami Rohr Prize for Jewish Literature.

– American University

Social and Behavioral Sciences

18-Apr-2016

Derailed Train of Thought? Brain’s Stopping System May Be at Fault

Study suggests same neural mechanism that interrupts body movement also interrupts cognition. Findings may give insights into Parkinson's: The system “over-stopping” motor activity might also be keeping patients over-focused. More speculatively, the findings may give insights into conditions characterized by distractibility, such as ADHD.

Media embedded: Image(s) (Embargo expired on 18-Apr-2016 at 05:00 ET)

Nature Communications; 220020375, R21NS085543 and DA026452

– University of California, San Diego

Most Americans Pray for Healing; More Than One Fourth Have Practiced ‘Laying on of Hands,’ Baylor Study Finds

Nearly nine of 10 Americans have relied upon healing prayer at some point in their lives, praying for others even more than for themselves, according to a study by a Baylor University epidemiologist. “The most surprising finding is that more than a quarter of all Americans have practiced laying on of hands — and nearly one in five has done so on multiple occasions

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– Baylor University

15-Apr-2016

Don’t Count on Strangers in Medical Emergencies, Especially if You’re African-American

So long, good Samaritans. In the first study of its kind, Cornell sociologists have found that people who have a medical emergency in a public place can’t necessarily rely on the kindness of strangers. Only 2.5 percent of people, or 1 in 39, got help from strangers before emergency medical personnel arrived, in research published April 14 in the American Journal of Public Health.

American Journal of Public Health, April 2016

– Cornell University

Self-Understanding Helps Criminal Substance Abusers

Impulsiveness, crime and problems with social interaction. Many substance abusers also struggle with antisocial personality disorders, which makes it difficult for them to complete a drug or alcohol treatment programme. New research from the Centre for Alcohol and Drug Research at Aarhus BSS reveals that just six additional counselling sessions may lower the drop-out rate and increase the outcome of the treatment programme.

– Aarhus University

Multiple Paternity May Offer Fewer Advantages Than Previously Thought

Promiscuity is common among females in the animal kingdom. Mating with multiple males can increase genetic diversity and enhance the survival of the offspring. When given a choice, female house mice mate with multiple males. "The females select their partner on the basis of their scent markings. These chemical signals provide a surprising amount of information about possible partners, including their health and disease resistance," explains Kerstin Thonhauser of the Konrad Lorenz Institute for Ethology at Vetmeduni Vienna.

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Evolutionary Biology

– University of Veterinary Medicine -- Vienna

14-Apr-2016

Family Dynamics Cause Major Stress for Latino Immigrant Families

Threats to familismo — deeply held cultural beliefs about the centrality of family in daily life — are often a major source of stress for immigrants and can have a negative impact on their overall health and well-being as they move forward in a new country.

– Florida State University

Law and Public Policy

16-Apr-2016

Danger in the Water: The Epidemic of Lead Across America

In this opinion piece, Anna Roberts, a fellow at the O'Neill Institute for National and Global Health Law at Georgetown University, discusses the current situation of lead exposure via water supply systems.

Media embedded: Image(s)

– O'Neill Institute for National & Global Health Law

Mexico’s First Real Attempt to Legalize Cannabis

In this opinion piece, Fernanda Alonso, an Associate at the O'Neill Institute for National and Global Health Law at Georgetown University, discusses Mexico’s marijuana policy changes.

Media embedded: Image(s)

– O'Neill Institute for National & Global Health Law

15-Apr-2016

A Shot in the Dark: New Surveillance Tool Called ShotSpotter Tracks and Records Incidents of Gunfire

When gunfire is heard and unreported, what does it reveal about the state of crime in America? The University of Virginia’s Jennifer Doleac is determined to find out. An assistant professor of public policy and economics at the Frank Batten School of Leadership and Public Policy, she has been using data from new surveillance technology to research the disparity between the number of recorded gunshot sounds and the number of reported incidents of gun violence.

Media embedded: Image(s)

– University of Virginia

Going Tobacco-Free, Tall Order for Health-Care Facilities

Health-care facilities being tobacco-free seems like a natural fit, but enforcing a tobacco-free policy that prohibits all people from using tobacco in buildings and on campus grounds it owns and leases can be a tall order. A state-wide survey showed that hospital, clinics and cancer treatment were among the health-care facilities in South Dakota with the more comprehensive policies. Use of an electronic health record system was key to assessing patients’ tobacco use.

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Expert(s) available

Model tobacco-free policy for health care facilities

– South Dakota State University

14-Apr-2016

ISU Economist Working to Better Assess the Costs of Climate Change

To effectively combat climate change, an ISU economist says we need to better understand the costs. Ivan Rudik says estimates of the damage from greenhouse gas emissions are highly uncertain. Better assessment will help find effective ways to address climate change.

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Expert(s) available

– Iowa State University

LifeWire Announcements

Texas Tech Debuts Financial Planning Academy for Teens Interested in Financial Advisory Careers

Sponsored by Charles Schwab Foundation, the first-of-its-kind program will feature curriculum from college students, professors and independent financial advisers.

(Embargo expired on 15-Apr-2016 at 11:05 ET)

– Texas Tech University

LifeWire Higher Education Events

U.S. Supreme Court Justice Sonia Sotomayor to Speak at URI's 130th Commencement, May 22

The thousands of students and families gathered for the University of Rhode Island's 130th Commencement will hear from one individual whose words are part of the national dialogue on equal justice and constitutional law.

– University of Rhode Island

LifeWire Marketplace

Who Controls the Internet Today?

American University Internet Governance Lab Professors Derrick Cogburn, Laura DeNardis, and Nanette Levinson explain why conflicts over governance of the Internet are attracting such widespread attention from policymakers and the general public.

Media embedded: Video

– American University

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