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Newswise LifeWire - Lifestyle and Social Science News for Journalists

Newswise LifeWire
Thursday, May 12, 2016

Public Edition | newswise.com

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Featured Story:

When You Take Acetaminophen, You Don’t Feel Others’ Pain as Much

When you take acetaminophen to reduce your pain, you may also be decreasing your empathy for both the physical and social aches that other people... (more)

– Ohio State University

Featured Story:

A New Series of Studies Identifies an Unknown Psychological Disorder: Maladaptive Daydreaming

Sufferers from the disorder spend about 60% of their waking time in an imaginary world they have created, realizing that it is a fantasy, and without... (more)

– University of Haifa

Science News

11-May-2016

Top Stories 5-11-2016

click to see today's top stories

– Newswise Trends

10-May-2016

Top Stories 5-10-2016

click to see today's top stories

(Embargo expired on 10-May-2016 at 09:00 ET)

– Newswise Trends

Arts and Humanities

09-May-2016

Dentistry Turns Art for a Good Cause

As part of a UofL pediatric dentistry fund-raising event at the annual St. James Court Art Show, members of the Alpha Omega International Dental Fraternity student chapter use dental plaster materials to practice techniques learned in the lab and clinic. But, instead of making molds of teeth, they create custom-made 3D plaster casts of hands, feet and faces.

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– University of Louisville

Social and Behavioral Sciences

11-May-2016

Are Italians or Swedes More Likely to Cheat on Their Taxes?

Wide variations can be seen in how far citizens from different countries evade tax. While this can be attributed to how well institutions deter tax avoidance through audits and fines, cultural differences may also play a part.

Frontiers in Psychology

– Frontiers

Social Objects in the Brain

The study suggests that we experience symbolic objects as social entities.

NeuroImage

– Aarhus University

These Audio Cues Are for the Birds

While analyzing and untangling multiple environmental sounds is an important tool for humans and animals, and humans and animals use similar cues to make sense of their acoustic worlds, according to new research from the University at Buffalo.

Journal of the Acoustic Society of America

– University at Buffalo

Do You See What I See?

Walking through Harvard Yard, you see it every day - one person stops to look up at a tree, perhaps trying to catch a glimpse of hawks that call the area home - and soon most passers-by are stopping to look in the same direction.

Proceedings of the Royal Society B

– Harvard University

A New Challenge for Caregivers: The Internet

What should caregivers do when their loved one is checking in on social media at the bank, essentially announcing their whereabouts? What if they are posting too often or don’t remember making online purchases?

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– Northwestern University

10-May-2016

Psychology Has Important Role in Helping Older Americans as They Age

With more than 13 percent of Americans currently over age 65, and that proportion expected to grow in the coming decades, psychology has played and will continue to play an important part in helping seniors maintain their health, adjust to retirement and prevent cognitive decline, according to the flagship journal of the American Psychological Association.

(Embargo expired on 10-May-2016 at 09:00 ET)

American Psychologist

– American Psychological Association (APA)

When You Take Acetaminophen, You Don’t Feel Others’ Pain as Much

When you take acetaminophen to reduce your pain, you may also be decreasing your empathy for both the physical and social aches that other people experience, a new study suggests.

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Social Cognitive and Affective Neuroscience

– Ohio State University

Young Women in STEM Fields Earn Up to One-Third Less Than Men

One year after they graduate, women with Ph.D.s in science and engineering fields earn 31 percent less than do men, according to a new study using previously unavailable data.

American Economic Review: Papers and Proceedings, May-2016

– Ohio State University

A New Series of Studies Identifies an Unknown Psychological Disorder: Maladaptive Daydreaming

Sufferers from the disorder spend about 60% of their waking time in an imaginary world they have created, realizing that it is a fantasy, and without losing contact with the real world. “One man told us about 35 characters participating in the repertoire of stories he imagines. Another related how for 30 years now he has been repeatedly imagining the plots of a series which is constantly evolving. With time, it takes over their lives,” said Professor Eli Somer of the University of Haifa, who identified the disorder

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Journal of Trauma and Dissociation

– University of Haifa

University of North Florida Researchers Show Running Barefoot Improves Working Memory

Running barefoot is better than running with shoes for your working memory, according to a new study published by researchers at the University of North Florida. The study is the first to show that running barefoot leads to better cognitive performance than running with shoes.

Perceptual and Motor Skills. May-2016

– University of North Florida

Out of Mind, Out of Sight

Ever search desperately for something, then realize you're looking straight at it the whole time? Research indicates that vision is controlled by the part of the brain associated with thinking. And in sight, too, it can be absent minded.

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PNAS, May 2016, MH63901, NS79698

– Georgia Institute of Technology

NYU Research: Borderline Personality Disorder Strongly Associated with Risk of STI/HIV Transmission Among Incarcerated Heterosexual African American Males

A study from the Department of Population Health at NYULMC and New York University's Center for Drug Use and HIV Research (CDUHR), led by Scheidell, is the first to examine the association between borderline personality disorder (BPD) and the risk for HIV and other STIs in an adult male criminal justice population.

Sexually Transmitted Diseases • Volume 43, Number 5, May 2016

– New York University

What Studying Hand-Washing Is Teaching About Compliance

In a myriad of workplace settings, standard processes are key to a successful operation, ensuring efficiency and safety. For these processes to work, employees must comply. But what’s the best way to go about enforcing that compliance, and sustain it?New research from Olin Business School at Washington University in St.

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– Washington University in St. Louis

Brain Pattern Predicts How Fast an Adult Learns a New Language

New University of Washington research shows that a five-minute measurement of resting-state brain activity predicted how quickly adults learned a second language.

– University of Washington

09-May-2016

Small Brain Area Plays Key Role in Making Everyday Decisions

A small brain structure plays a central role in the many decisions like this we make each day. But it hasn’t been clear how a limited number of neurons in this small part of the brain can support an unlimited number of choices. Now, studying how macaque monkeys choose between juice drinks, researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis have found that neurons in the orbitofrontal cortex can re-map to make different decisions when circumstances change.

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Nature Neuroscience, May 9, 2016

– Washington University in St. Louis

Digital Media May Be Changing How You Think

New study finds users focus on concrete details rather than the big picture.

ACM Digital Library

– Dartmouth College

Congregations Striving for Racial and Ethnic Diversity May Shrink, Baylor University Study Finds

Congregations attempting to boost their racial and ethnic diversity may end up with fewer people in the seats, according to a Baylor University study.

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– Baylor University

Theater Professor Uses Story-Building for Social Changes

At a time when presidential debates and rallies are riddled with incivility and the country seems more polarized than ever, a Buffalo State professor is teaching a different approach to conflict resolution—one based in storytelling. Drew Kahn, professor of theater and founder and director of the college’s social justice-based Anne Frank Project (AFP), has delivered numerous workshops with public school students and teachers from Buffalo to Rwanda that demonstrate how using stories to address thorny problems can be powerful and effective.

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Expert(s) available

– SUNY Buffalo State

Education

11-May-2016

An Online Portal to Curb Hate Speech and Prevent Radicalization

A group of researchers based at Concordia University in Montreal is working to curb hate speech through the SOMEONE (SOcial Media EducatiON Every day) initiative, created to sensitize youth, educators and the broader public to patterns of online hostility.

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– Concordia University

10-May-2016

Black Students More Likely to Be Identified as Gifted if Teachers Are Black

African-American children are three times as likely to be placed in gifted-education programs if they have a black teacher rather than a white teacher, according to research by faculty members at the Indiana University and Vanderbilt University.

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Journal of Public Administration Research and Theory, April 2016

– Indiana University

Obama’s Address at Rutgers Commencement Recalls Other Presidential Stops

Obama’s Address at Rutgers Commencement Recalls Other Presidential Stops

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– Rutgers University

Law and Public Policy

12-May-2016

University of Utah Law Student Charts Impressive Path of Public Service on Journey to Graduation

Nubia Peña is one of 122 students who will graduate from the University of Utah S.J. Quinney College of Law on Friday. She was selected as one of the top 25 law students in the country by National Jurist magazine for her commitment to social justice, empowering marginalized communities, and developing new young leaders of color.

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– University of Utah

11-May-2016

Large Reductions in Prison Population Can Be Made Without Endangering Public Safety

A paper published in the journal Criminology & Public Policy addresses one of the most important crime policy questions in America: Can prison populations be reduced without endangering the public?

– Indiana University

LifeWire Announcements

Georgia State University to Create College of the Arts

Dr. Wade Weast has been named the founding dean of Georgia State University’s College of the Arts, a new academic unit that will focus on education in arts and related media, promote creativity and respond to the changing needs of artists, on- and off-campus.

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– Georgia State University

LGBT Institute and Georgia State University Launch Research Partnership

The LGBT Institute at the Center for Civil and Human Rights and Georgia State University have launched a partnership to link researchers with lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender (LGBT) advocates to tell the stories of LGBT persons in the South, home to more LGBT adults than other U.S. regions.

– Georgia State University

Theater for Social Change Champion Bruce Levitt Awarded Inaugural Engaged Scholar Prize

Professor of performing and media arts Bruce Levitt is the inaugural recipient of Cornell’s Engaged Scholar Prize. The annual prize recognizes a faculty member who inspires others with innovative integration of teaching, learning and research involving public or community-based partnerships.

– Cornell University

25 Myths of Dating, Sex and Marriage Debunked in New Book

How we feel about ourselves and those we love depends in large part on the assumptions and expectations we hold about romantic relationships. It turns out that many of our beliefs about intimate relationships aren't backed up by science. In his new book, Great Myths of Intimate Relationships: Dating, Sex, and Marriage, Binghamton University psychology professor Matthew D. Johnson debunks 25 of the biggest myths out there.

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Great Myths of Intimate Relationships: Dating, Sex, and Marriage

– Binghamton University, State University of New York

UMB, Guidewell Financial Solutions Enter a Financial Well-Being Partnership in West Baltimore

The University of Maryland, Baltimore and Guidewell Financial Solutions are partnering on campus and at the university's new Community Engagement Center. The partnership provides West Baltimore residents and members of the UMB community with financial counseling, housing counseling, and other resources to promote financial awareness and empowerment.

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– University of Maryland, Baltimore

Williams College Professor Wins Mellon Foundation Grant to Assist in Research on Kenyan Runners

Williams College Prof. Jessica Chapman awarded $240,000 grant to pursue anthropological training to continue her research on the economic and cultural influence of Kenya's running industry.

11600610

– Williams College

Georgia State University to Offer Bachelor of Science Degree in Public Health

Georgia State University will offer a new bachelor of science degree in public health with an emphasis on urban and global health issues.

– Georgia State University

Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute Business School Maintains Prestigious AACSB Business Accreditation

The Lally School of Management at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute (RPI) has maintained its business accreditation by AACSB International—The Association to Advance Collegiate Schools of Business. Founded in 1916, AACSB International is the longest serving global accrediting body for business schools that offer one, two, or all of the following programs: undergraduate, master’s, and doctoral degrees in business and accounting.

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– Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute (RPI)

“Father of Autoimmune Disease” Honored at Annual Luncheon

The American Autoimmune Related Diseases Association (AARDA) hosted its 16th Annual Derby Luncheon and Auction on Saturday, May 7 at MacRay Harbor on Lake St. Clair in Harrison Township. The Derby also commemorated AARDA’s 25th anniversary.

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– American Autoimmune Related Diseases Association (AARDA)

LifeWire Higher Education Events

Celebrating USciences’ 195th Commencement and 5th Bachelor’s Conferment Ceremonies

University of the Sciences will celebrate the class of 2016 at its 195th Commencement Ceremony on Wednesday May 25, 2016. The University is honored to bestow an honorary doctor of science degree on board chairman Marvin Samson HomAlm’96, who will be counted among the approximately 550 graduates that day.

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– University of the Sciences

Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai Holds Inaugural Master’s Degree Commencement Ceremony

Pulitzer, Polk and Peabody Award-Winning Science Journalist and Global Health Expert Laurie Ann Garrett to Receive Honorary Degree and Deliver Keynote Address

– Mount Sinai Health System

Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai Honors Graduates and Healthcare Leaders at 47th Annual Commencement Ceremony

Former US Secretary of Health and Human Services Kathleen Sebelius to Receive Honorary Degree and Deliver Keynote Address

– Mount Sinai Health System

Summer Institute Challenges Students with Intensive Research Projects

Cornell College students will soon be diving into new and ongoing research projects to discover the unknown about a number of topics including box turtles, eating disorder prevention, supermassive black holes, monarch butterflies, and digital games for language learning.

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– Cornell College

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