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Newswise LifeWire - Lifestyle and Social Science News for Journalists

Newswise LifeWire
Thursday, July 14, 2016

Public Edition | newswise.com

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Featured Story:

Workplace Climate, Not Women's 'Nature,' Responsible for Gender-Based Job Stress

A study by an Indiana University sociologist subjected both men and women to the negative social conditions that many women report experiencing in... (more)

– Indiana University

Featured Story:

Stand-Up Comics More Likely to Die Prematurely Than Film Comedians and Dramatic Actors

The world's best stand-up comedians - household names including Kevin Hart, Amy Schumer, Jimmy Fallon, Chris Rock, Jerry Seinfield, Ricky Gervais and Eddie Murphy - are more likely to die than comedic and dramatic screen and stage actors, according... (more)

– Australian Catholic University (ACU)

Arts and Humanities

13-Jul-2016

Stand-Up Comics More Likely to Die Prematurely Than Film Comedians and Dramatic Actors

The world's best stand-up comedians - household names including Kevin Hart, Amy Schumer, Jimmy Fallon, Chris Rock, Jerry Seinfield, Ricky Gervais and Eddie Murphy - are more likely to die than comedic and dramatic screen and stage actors, according to a landmark study published in the <i>International Journal of Cardiology

International Journal of Cardiology

– Australian Catholic University (ACU)

Social and Behavioral Sciences

14-Jul-2016

Income Inequality Leads Millennials to Start Families Before Marriage

Rising income inequality, and the resulting scarcity of certain types of jobs, is a key reason a growing number of young Americans are having babies before getting married.

(Embargo expired on 14-Jul-2016 at 00:00 ET)

American Sociological Review, Aug-2016

– American Sociological Association (ASA)

Income Inequality Leads Millennials to Start Families Before Marriage

Rising income inequality, and the resulting scarcity of certain types of jobs, is a key reason young Americans are having babies before getting married.

(Embargo expired on 14-Jul-2016 at 00:05 ET)

American Sociological Review, Aug-2016

– Johns Hopkins University

Social Media Sites Obstruct Children’s Moral Development, Say Parents.

The ‘parent poll’ carried out by a team at the Jubilee Centre for Character and Virtues found that only 15% of parents thought that popular social media sites, such as Facebook, provided a positive influence on a young person’s character.

– University of Birmingham

13-Jul-2016

Humans Perceive Time Somewhere in Between Reality and Our Expectations

New research, using a Bayesian inference model of audio and visual stimuli, has shown how our perception of time lies mid-way between reality and our expectations.

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Scientific Reports, Jul-2016

– University of Birmingham

Study: Political Leanings Affect Opinions of Civil Liberties vs. Security Tradeoff

Liberal American adults are less likely to favor counterterrorism policies that reduce civil liberties, than are conservative American adults, according to new research from RTI International and Duke NUS Medical School.

Contemporary Economic Policy, July 2016

– RTI International

Millennials and Marrying Young: Like Mother, Like Child

Daughters and sons of mothers who tied the knot young are more likely to want to marry early too, but only if Mom stayed married, new research has found. And millennials whose moms divorced tend to want to move more slowly, perhaps in the interest of avoiding the mistakes of their parents.

– Ohio State University

Six Ways to Make Media Coverage of Immigration More Constructive

LAWRENCE — U.S. immigration policy has become a hotly debated issue in the presidential primaries, and it figures to continue in the campaign as Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump appear headed to receiving their parties' nominations later this summer.

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Practicing Anthropology

– University of Kansas

Reducing Racial Bias Possible in Older Children, Finds UBC Study

Research has shown children have racial biases from an early age, but a new University of British Columbia study has found that it is possible to combat prejudice in older kids.

Child Development

– University of British Columbia

Students’ PTSD Symptoms Fluctuate Greatly During First Year of College

A new University at Buffalo study is helping researchers better understand how post-traumatic stress disorder fluctuates in students during their first year of college.

Psychological Trauma: Theory, Research and Policy

– University at Buffalo

Study Shows Stark Differences in How Conservatives, Liberals Value Empirical Data

A University of Alabama-led study surveyed participants in the Deep South and West Coast on the opportunity to view novel data on three topics - two of which were political - but weren't told of the results or who commissioned the studies. Researchers found conservatives were less interested in the data.

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Journal of Research in Personality, Aug. 2016

– University of Alabama

New Book Explores Correlation Between Pornography, Violence Against Women

“Violence Against Women in Pornography,” a new book written by Dekeseredy, the Anna Deane Carlson Endowed Chair of Social Sciences and director of the WVU Research Center on Violence, delves into the impact the pornography industry has had on technology; how it has become more mainstream over time; and what it’ll take to reverse the “rape myth” that is pervasive in society.

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Expert(s) available

– West Virginia University - Eberly College of Arts and Sciences

12-Jul-2016

NYU Meyers Study on Global Nurse Migration Trends

A total of 177 countries were eligible for inclusion in the study, representing findings from 200,453 IEN applicants to the United States between 2003 and 2013. Their work found that changes to the NCLEX-RN licensure examination (2008), the global economic crisis of late 2008, and the passing of the World Health Organization’s Code for Ethical Recruitment of Health Workers (2010), all played a part in the significant drop in IEN applicants.

World Health Organization supported

– New York University

Study Finds Broad Range of ‘Independence’ For U.S. Young Adults

The idea of what it means to become “independent” has evolved significantly in recent generations, and new research finds that the concept of being wholly dependent or independent doesn’t apply to almost half of young adults in the United States.

Acta Sociologica, June 29, 2016

– North Carolina State University

Workplace Climate, Not Women's 'Nature,' Responsible for Gender-Based Job Stress

A study by an Indiana University sociologist subjected both men and women to the negative social conditions that many women report experiencing in male-dominated occupations. The result: Men showed the same physiological stress response to the conditions as did women.

Media embedded: Image(s)

American Journal of Sociology, Volume 122, Number 1 | July 2016

– Indiana University

Genetics Play Role in Character Traits Related to Academic Success, Study Says

Character traits, such as grit or desire to learn, have a heavy hand in academic success and are partially rooted in genetics, according to a psychology study at The University of Texas at Austin.

– University of Texas at Austin (UT Austin)

The Moral Tipping Point: Why It’s Hard to Shake a Bad Impression

In the study, "The Tipping Point of Moral Change: When Do Good and Bad Acts Make Good and Bad Actors?," Chicago Booth Assistant Professor of Behavioral Science Ed O'Brien and post-doctoral scholar Nadav Klein find that people require more evidence to perceive improvement in someone’s moral character than to perceive a decline. In other words, it is easier to become a sinner than a saint.

Social Cognition

– University of Chicago Booth School of Business

Top News Outlets See More Risks Than Benefits in Employees' Use of Social Media

Realizing the risks of social media, major news organizations have created guidelines for employees regarding how to use these outlets, separate from the companies' existing codes of conduct. Little scholarly attention has been paid to the guidelines so far.

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The Communication Review

– Lehigh University

Help at Hand for People Watching Their Weight

Researchers from the University of Sydney's Boden Institute of Obesity, Nutrition, Exercise & Eating Disorders have developed a portable and easy-to-use method to help people estimate portion size using only their hands.

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Journal of Nutritional Science

– University of Sydney

Sociologists to Explore Social Movements at Annual Meeting in Seattle, Aug. 20-23

The conference will feature approximately 600 sessions and more than 3,200 studies covering such subjects as health, education, immigration, family, politics, children, race, religion, work, sex, criminal justice, disability, environment, relationships, gender, culture, drugs/alcohol, technology, disasters, and an abundance of others.

– American Sociological Association (ASA)

Spit Scientist

A lively look at a quirky but important and growing field of research.

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Expert(s) available

– University of California, Irvine

11-Jul-2016

How Tom Brady Won Fans by Dodging ‘Deflategate’ Questions

Sometimes, saying “I don’t know” may be the best way for sports stars and other celebrities to gain favor with the public when faced with tough questions.

International Journal of Sport Communication

– Ohio State University

Education

13-Jul-2016

Help Students Avoid the ‘Pain’ of Back-to-School

Today’s students are susceptible to a range of musculoskeletal injuries, such as neck and back pain, as a result of some of the equipment and devices they frequently use: backpacks, smartphones and other mobile devices. As the end of summer approaches, parents can help their children avoid the “aches and pains” of going back to school by providing some practical advice, according to the American Chiropractic Association (ACA).

Expert(s) available

– American Chiropractic Association

12-Jul-2016

NYU Study Identifies “Book Deserts” – Poor Neighborhoods Lacking Children’s Books – Across the Country

A study led by NYU’s Steinhardt School of Culture, Education, and Human Development finds a startling scarcity of children’s books in low-income neighborhoods in Detroit, Washington, D.C., and Los Angeles.

Urban Education

– New York University

David Knuff Appointed Assistant Dean of External Relations for The Paul Merage School of Business at UC Irvine

David Knuff, Ph.D., has been promoted to assistant dean of External Relations for The Paul Merage School of Business at UC Irvine, effective July 1. In this newly-created role, Knuff will be tasked with aligning outreach and program offerings with a customer-centric focus.

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– University of California, Irvine, The Paul Merage School of Business

Kennesaw State Professor Receives National Leadership Award

Jennifer Purcell, an assistant professor of leadership studies at Kennesaw State University, received the 2016 John Saltmarsh Award for Emerging Leaders in Civic Engagement from the American Democracy Project

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– Kennesaw State University

11-Jul-2016

New Global Rankings Name UC San Diego 17th Best University in World

The University of California San Diego has been ranked the 17th best university in the world, up four spots compared to last year, by the Center for World University Rankings (CWUR).

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– University of California, San Diego

Law and Public Policy

13-Jul-2016

Study Shows Allocation of Police Resources Affects Economic Welfare, Inequality

Decisions about how to allocate police resources in a community are likely to influence not only crime but also housing prices, overall economic welfare and social inequality, according to a new study by economists at Indiana and Maryland.

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NBER Working Paper No. 22166, April 2016

– Indiana University

12-Jul-2016

The True Cost of Crime -- in Carbon Footprints

Recent research by the University of Surrey's Centre for Environmental Strategy has found that despite policy makers currently examining the economic and social impacts of crime, the environmental impacts have not, to date, been included.

Journal of Industrial Ecology

– University of Surrey

Trend of Non-Downtown Job Growth Continues in Southland, UCI Researchers Find

The University of California, Irvine has released two new regional research reports that reveal a majority of jobs and job growth continue to exist outside traditional downtown venues. They also show that employment surges and declines, known as business churning, has a positive impact on some areas and a negative impact on others.

– University of California, Irvine

Small Rise in Booze Duty Could Cut Violence-Related Emergency Visits by 6,000 a Year

A small rise of 1% in alcohol prices could significantly reduce violence-related injuries in England and Wales, consequently reducing their burden on hard-pressed emergency departments, concludes a study by Cardiff University.

Injury Prevention

– Cardiff University

National Police Training Expert: Use Common Sense/Open Dialogue to Reduce Potential Police Shootings

Harvard Law Fellow and University of Louisville law professor Dr.Laura McNeal is a nationally-recognized expert in effective police training techniques and can provide unique insight, as well as real-life, tangible solutions to both the law enforcement and minority communities in the wake of the recent shootings.

Media embedded: Video / Image(s)
Expert(s) available

– University of Louisville

LifeWire Policy and Public Affairs

CAP Applauds Introduction of HR 5721 to Reform Medicare's LCD Process

The CAP supports the introduction of HR 5721, which primarily improves the local coverage determination (LCD) process to help ensure open meetings, upfront disclosure, and reconsideration with options for appeal—all of which greatly affect patients, pathologists, and other physicians across the US.

– College of American Pathologists (CAP)

LifeWire Announcements

S&T Demonstrates Integration of First Responder Technologies

&T’s NGFR program recently held a demonstration highlighting innovative technologies that combined to improve communications and situational awareness of first responders during disasters and critical incidents.

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– Homeland Security's Science & Technology Directorate

Notre Dame Launches New 5+1 Postdoctoral Fellowship Program Backed by $1.5 Million Mellon Foundation Grant

The College of Arts and Letters at Notre Dame has launched a new postdoctoral fellowship that will allow new doctorate recipients to further their research, expand their teaching portfolio and explore career opportunities outside the academy.

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– University of Notre Dame

AARDA Rated “4-Star” Nonprofit by Charity Navigator

Recognizing the American Autoimmune Related Diseases Association, Inc’s (AARDA) strong financial health and commitment to accountability and transparency, Charity Navigator has awarded the organization its highest, 4-star rating for the seventh time in the last eight years.

– American Autoimmune Related Diseases Association (AARDA)

GW Announces Institute for African Studies

The George Washington University announced the launch of an institute focused on the major issues confronting the global community in Africa, one of the fastest economic growth regions in the world. The Institute for African Studies is led by inaugural director Roy R. Grinker.

– George Washington University

RTI International to Fund and Conduct Research on Victimization Among the LGBTQ Community

In the wake of mass murder in Orlando and the passage of House Bill 2 in North Carolina, a law requiring individuals to use the bathroom corresponding to the sex listed on their birth certificate, RTI International will self-fund research to better understand the LGBTQ community and violence in the United States.

– RTI International

New Grant From Department of Education Will Support 45 Teachers to Advance Their Careers in High-Needs Disability Education

GW’s Online Master’s Program Will Increase Number of Special Education Teachers Focused on Brain Injury and Autism Education

– George Washington University

LifeWire Higher Education Events

Tufts’ Diversity Program Gives Undergraduates Experience in Key Health Issues

Seventeen college students from across the country are at Tufts University’s Boston campus for ten weeks to experience life in a lab. The Building Diversity in Biomedical Sciences program provides research and career training to students typically under-represented in biomedical sciences.

HL007785

– Tufts University

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