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Newswise LifeWire - Lifestyle and Social Science News for Journalists
Newswise LifeWire
Monday, August 8, 2016

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Life
(26 New)
 

Social and Behavioral Sciences

05-Aug-2016


Women Appear to Be More Accepting of Their Bodies/Weight

Despite growing rates of obesity in the United States, and a culture apparently obsessed with selfies, women today appear to be more accepting of their bodies than in the past, at least in regard to weight, according to research presented at the American Psychological Association’s 124th Annual Convention. “While women consistently report being more dissatisfied with their bodies than men as far as thinness is concerned, that dissatisfaction has decreased over the 31-year period we studied,” said Bryan Karazsia, PhD, of The College of Wooster, who presented the research.

– American Psychological Association (APA)

American Psychological Association’s 124th Annual Convention

Embargo expired on 05-Aug-2016 at 12:00 ET


Psychologist Reveals Science Behind a Fulfilling Single Life

Dating shows, dating apps – they all strive to make sure none of us end up uncoupled forever. But it turns out many single people embrace their single lives, and are likely to experience more psychological growth and development than married people, according to a psychologist who presented at the American Psychological Association’s 124th Annual Convention.

– American Psychological Association (APA)

American Psychological Association’s 124th Annual Convention

Embargo expired on 05-Aug-2016 at 16:00 ET


Can Nature Videos Help Improve Prisoner Behavior?

Researchers have identified a simple intervention that may help reduce levels of violence in maximum security prisons. Inmates who viewed nature videos showed reduced levels of aggression and were less likely to be disciplined than those in similar cellblocks, according to research presented at the American Psychological Association’s 124th Annual Convention.

– American Psychological Association (APA)

American Psychological Association’s 124th Annual Convention

Embargo expired on 05-Aug-2016 at 11:00 ET


Smiling Baby Monkeys and the Roots of Laughter

When human and chimp infants are dozing, they sometimes show facial movements that resemble smiles. These facial expressions -- called spontaneous smiles -- are considered the evolutionary origin of real smiles and laughter.

– Kyoto University

Primates


Rats with Drinking Problem Provide Genetic Basis for Alcoholism

Rats bred to abuse alcohol accumulated numerous genetic differences, many of which occurred in regulatory regions of the genome, reports Feng C. Zhou at Indiana University in Indianapolis and William Muir at Purdue University in West Lafayette Indiana, and colleagues in a study published on August 4 in PLOS Genetics.

– PLOS

PLOS Genetics


Working Full Time Not Enough to Lift Thousands of Florida's Working Parents Out of Poverty

Even after working 40 or more hours a week, thousands of Florida parents would need to earn nearly double the state's current hourly minimum wage in order to break even, according to policy analyses conducted by researchers at the National Center for Children in Poverty (NCCP), Columbia University Mailman School of Public Health. Findings from NCCP's latest brief, on Florida's minimum wage, underscore the importance of considering the consequences of policies--and policy interactions--on the lives of working families.

– Columbia University, Mailman School of Public Health


After the fight, friendship

It's not exactly front-page news that when it comes to conflict, men and women are very different.

– Harvard University

Current Biology


Texas A&M Study Finds Media Fuels Anti-Muslim Attitudes

People who rely on the media for information on Muslims have greater negative emotions toward Muslims, according to a study co-authored by Texas A&M Professor Srividya Ramasubramanian. The study found direct contact with Muslims has the opposite effect.

– Texas A&M University

Journal of Communication


Got Sleep? The Amount You Get Could Affect Your Marital Mindset

A new study by two Florida State University researchers found that when husbands and wives get more sleep than on an average night, they are more satisfied with their marriages, at least the following day.

– Florida State University

Journal of Family Psychology, July-2016


Child-Pedestrian Incidents Increase with Start of School Year

The start of the school year is the most dangerous time on neighborhood streets and in school zones for child-pedestrians and bus riders.

– Vanderbilt University Medical Center

04-Aug-2016


Focus on Future to Save More Money

When it comes to personal finances, impulsiveness and materialism can lead to bad decisions and a failure to save enough, but research presented at the annual convention of the American Psychological Association suggests that when people focus more on the future, they tend to be less impulsive, regardless of their level of financial literacy.

– American Psychological Association (APA)

American Psychological Association’s 124th Annual Convention

Embargo expired on 04-Aug-2016 at 12:00 ET


Brain Training Reduces Dementia Risk Across Ten Years

While many companies have long promised that their brain-training products can sharpen aging minds, only one type of computerized brain training so far has been shown to improve people’s mental quickness and significantly reduce the risk of dementia, according to research presented at the American Psychological Association’s Annual Convention.

– American Psychological Association (APA)

American Psychological Association’s 124th Annual Convention

Embargo expired on 04-Aug-2016 at 10:00 ET


Curiosity Has the Power to Change Behavior for the Better

Curiosity could be an effective tool to entice people into making smarter and sometimes healthier decisions, according to research presented at the annual convention of the American Psychological Association.

– American Psychological Association (APA)

American Psychological Association’s 124th Annual Convention

Embargo expired on 04-Aug-2016 at 13:00 ET


Tinder: Swiping Self Esteem?

Whether they’re swiping left or swiping right, male users of the popular dating app Tinder appear to have lower levels of self-esteem and all users appear to have more negative perception of body image than those who don’t use the app, according to research presented at the annual convention of the American Psychological Association.

– American Psychological Association (APA)

American Psychological Association’s 124th Annual Convention

Embargo expired on 04-Aug-2016 at 16:00 ET


’Media Contagion’ Is Factor in Mass Shootings, Study Says

People who commit mass shootings in America tend to share three traits: rampant depression, social isolation and pathological narcissism, according to a paper presented at the American Psychological Association’s annual convention that calls on the media to deny such shooters the fame they seek.

– American Psychological Association (APA)

American Psychological Association’s 124th Annual Convention

Embargo expired on 04-Aug-2016 at 15:00 ET


Selfless People Have More Sex, Study Finds

New research from the University of Guelph and Nipissing University shows that people who help others are more desirable to the opposite sex, have more sexual partners and more frequent sex.

– University of Guelph

British Journal of Psychology


Bloom and Bust: Algae Takes a Heavy Toll on Florida Tourism

The harmful algae bloom affecting some South Florida beaches has driven away half of people considering visiting the Sunshine State and could deter nearly three-fourths of those thinking of traveling to the affected counties, a new study shows.

– University of Florida


Pets: A Positive Impact on Kids

Although welcoming a pet into your home is a big commitment, children can learn responsibility by learning to care for pets with adult supervision. In addition, childhood pets can also introduce children to friendship and family bonding.

– Texas A&M University


Health Tip: Ways to Keep Kids Active and Cool in the Peak of Summer Heat

In the dog days of summer it can be easy to let your children sit in front of the television, but as the fall approaches, it is important to get the kids in an active routine. Karin Richards, chair of the Kinesiology Department at University of the Sciences, shares some ways to get your kids exercise without braving the heat.

Expert(s) available

– University of the Sciences

Education

08-Aug-2016


Children with Hearing Loss and Their Families From 15 Countries Benefited From Unique Summer Session Programs

Many regions of the world today still lack ready access to audiology, auditory-verbal therapy and educational support services for young children with hearing loss and their families. JTC’s International Summer Sessions help to address the service gap.

– John Tracy Clinic

04-Aug-2016


Six Tips to Help Students Choose a Major

Students are often allowed to enter college under the designation “undecided,” but they should try to declare a major sooner rather than later in order to graduate on time, said Amy Ames, assistant director of professional development in Baylor University’s Office of Career and Professional Development.

Expert(s) available

– Baylor University

Law and Public Policy

04-Aug-2016


Viewing Video in Slow Motion Makes Action Appear More Intentional, New Study Finds

Watching a video of a harmful or violent act being committed can provide useful evidence of the circumstances surrounding the action. But new research shows that watching that same video in slow motion can often cause viewers to see something that may not be there: intentionality.

– University of Chicago Booth School of Business

Proceedings of the National Academies of Sciences (PNAS)

LifeWire Announcements


Academic Boot Camp Helps Soldiers Transition Into Students

To help veterans and military personnel transition into the academic world, the University of Chicago is participating in the Warrior-Scholar Project for the second year in a row.

– University of Chicago


Rensselaer President Shirley Ann Jackson Recognized by Savoy Magazine

Savoy Magazine has named Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute President Shirley Ann Jackson among the “Power 300: 2016 Most Influential Black Corporate Directors” in its summer issue.

– Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute (RPI)


Faculty From the Johns Hopkins School of Nursing Offer Expertise in Medicare, Medicaid Initiative

Jacquelyn Campbell, PhD, RN, FAAN, and Sarah Szanton, PhD, ANP, FAAN—experts from the Johns Hopkins School of Nursing in the respective specialties of violence and aging—are serving as national advisors on a Centers for Medicare & Medicaid (CMS) Technical Expert Panel examining the gap between clinical care and community services.

– Johns Hopkins School of Nursing


Johns Hopkins School of Nursing's Phyllis Sharps Receives Lifetime Achievement Award

Phyllis Sharps, Professor and Associate Dean for Community Programs, received the 2016 Lifetime Achievement Award in Education and Research from the Association of Black Nursing Faculty.

– Johns Hopkins School of Nursing

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