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Newswise MedWire - Medical News for Journalists
Newswise MedWire
Thursday, November 9, 2017

Public Edition | newswise.com

Medical
(145 New)
 

Medical News

09-Nov-2017


Older Donor Lungs Should Be Considered For Transplantation

The use of lungs from donors older than age 60 has been shown to achieve reasonable outcomes and should be considered as a viable option.

– The Society of Thoracic Surgeons

The Annals of Thoracic Surgery

Embargo expired on 09-Nov-2017 at 00:00 ET


Theranostic Nanoparticles for Tracking and Monitoring Disease State

A new SLAS Technology review article by researchers at the University of Southern California and the University of California, Los Angeles, sheds light on the growing number and more sophisticated designs of theranostic nanoparticles.

– SLAS (Society for Laboratory Automation and Screening)

Embargo expired on 09-Nov-2017 at 09:00 ET


Survey Finds That Pediatric Care Doctors Attempt to Address Parental Health Issues That Affect Children, but are Limited by Practice-Related Barriers and Physician Attitudes

A national survey of more than 200 pediatric primary care physicians found that while over three-quarters addressed at least one parental health issue, such as maternal depression or parental tobacco use, during child health visits and a majority rec...

– Johns Hopkins Medicine

Journal of Pediatrics


The “Healthier” Version of Smoking is More Harmful to Youthful Users Than It Seems

There is a general perception among the public that e-cigarettes or vaping products are safer than conventional cigarettes. While smoking has fallen significantly, public health questions arise about vaping, especially about youth usage and other vul...

– Society for Risk Analysis (SRA)

SRA Annual Meeting, Dec-2017


Aging Water Systems Nationwide Pose Threats to Health

Legionnaires disease outbreaks in New York City and toxic levels of lead in Flint, Michigan have raised questions about how to manage risks in aging water systems. Multiple studies assessing the risk of opportunistic pathogens in water systems and th...

– Society for Risk Analysis (SRA)

SRA Annual Meeting, Dec-2017


Majority of Hospice Workers Don’t Have End-of-life Wishes Themselves

One might assume that health care providers, especially those dealing with terminally ill patients, such as hospice workers would have a living will or advance directive. Surprisingly, Florida Atlantic University researchers found that the majority o...

– Florida Atlantic University

The American Journal of Medicine


ISPOR 20th Annual European Congress Examines the Real Value in Health Care

ISPOR, the professional society for health economics and outcomes research, recently concluded its 20th Annual European Congress in Glasgow, Scotland, UK. The congress was held 4-8 November 2017 and facilitated discussion on the global challenge of d...

– International Society for Pharmacoeconomics and Outcomes Research (ISPOR)

ISPOR 20th Annual European Congress, Nov-2017


University of Birmingham Experts Unite in World Antibiotic Awareness Week

Scientists from the University of Birmingham are uniting to support WHO's World Antibiotic Awareness Week (WAAW) from November 13th to 19th 2017.

– University of Birmingham


Remembrance Day:Can Exercise Help with PTSD?

CIHR-promoted researchers explore Post-traumatic stress disorder

– Canadian Institutes of Health Research (CIHR)

08-Nov-2017


Closing the Rural Health Gap: Media Update from RWJF and Partners on Rural Health Disparities

Rural counties continue to rank lowest among counties across the U.S., in terms of health outcomes. A group of national organizations including the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation and the National 4-H Council are leading the way to close the rural hea...

– Newswise

Virtual Press Briefing - Closing the Rural Health Gap

Embargo expired on 08-Nov-2017 at 08:55 ET


Mount Sinai Researchers Develop First Mathematical Model for Predicting Patient Response to Immunotherapy

Researchers at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai have created the first mathematical model that can predict how a cancer patient will benefit from certain immunotherapies, according to a study published in Nature.

– Mount Sinai Health System

Nature, Nov-2017

Embargo expired on 08-Nov-2017 at 13:00 ET


Reduced Blood Flow from Heart May Reduce Blood Flow in Brain’s Memory Center

Older people whose hearts pump less blood may have reduced blood flow in the memory-processing areas of the brain, according to a study published in the November 8, 2017, online issue of Neurology®, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neu...

– American Academy of Neurology (AAN)

Neurology®

Embargo expired on 08-Nov-2017 at 16:00 ET


Research Links Heart Function to Brain’s Memory Center

Research by a team of Vanderbilt University Medical Center scientists suggests that older people whose hearts pump less blood have blood flow reductions in the temporal lobe regions of the brain, where Alzheimer’s pathology first begins.

– Vanderbilt University Medical Center

Neurology

Embargo expired on 08-Nov-2017 at 16:00 ET


Breast Cancer Recurrence Risk Lingers Years After Treatment Ends

Even 20 years after a diagnosis, women with a type of breast cancer fueled by estrogen still face a substantial risk of cancer returning or spreading, according to a new analysis from an international team of investigators published in the New Englan...

– Michigan Medicine - University of Michigan

New England Journal of Medicine

Embargo expired on 08-Nov-2017 at 17:00 ET


Red Blood Cell Function, Creation and Renewal the Focus of Sickle Cell Conference Symposium

Researchers will meet to discuss the physiology, function and future of red blood cells (RBCs) in sickle cell disease (SCD) at the “Red Cell Physiology” symposium during the American Physiological Society’s Physiological and Pathophysiological ...

– American Physiological Society (APS)

Physiological and Pathophysiological Consequences of Sickle Cell Disease

Embargo expired on 08-Nov-2017 at 13:30 ET


Endocrine Society Experts Examine How Diabetes Harms Body’s Smallest Blood Vessels

The Endocrine Society issued a new Scientific Statement today examining how diabetes damages the body’s smallest blood vessels as well as how the condition affects the body’s natural repair processes designed to protect the eyes, kidneys, nerves ...

– Endocrine Society

Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism

Embargo expired on 08-Nov-2017 at 14:00 ET


How Chronic Inflammation Tips the Balance of Immune Cells to Promote Liver Cancer

Chronic inflammation is known to drive many cancers, especially liver cancer. Researchers have long thought that’s because inflammation directly affects cancer cells, stimulating their division and protecting them from cell death. But University of...

– University of California San Diego Health

Nature; R01AI043477; P42ES010337

Embargo expired on 08-Nov-2017 at 13:00 ET


How Cells Detect, Mend DNA Damage May Improve Chemotherapy

Human cells have a way of detecting and mending DNA damage caused by some common chemotherapy drugs, according to a new study from Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis. The findings could have important implications for treating canc...

– Washington University in St. Louis

Nature, Nov-2017; R01 GM108648; R01 GM109102; R01 CA193318; IRG-58-010-56; 15-FY17-01; MC-II-2015-453

Embargo expired on 08-Nov-2017 at 13:00 ET


Gene Breakthrough on Lithium Treatment for Bipolar Disorder

Genes linked to schizophrenia in psychiatric patients suffering from bipolar disorder are the reason why such patients don't respond to the "gold standard" treatment for bipolar – the drug lithium – according to international research led by the ...

– University of Adelaide

JAMA Psychiatry

Embargo expired on 08-Nov-2017 at 11:00 ET


Novel Approach Could Limit Common Complications of Immunotherapy

Connecting cancer immunotherapy drugs such as anti-CTLA4 and anti-PD-L1 to peptides that bind to tissues in and around tumors enhanced their effects while limiting adverse events.

– University of Chicago Medical Center

Science Translational Medicine

Embargo expired on 08-Nov-2017 at 14:00 ET


New Study Findings Unlock the Secret of Why Some People with Pancreatic Cancer Live Longer than Others

The pancreatic cancer and immunotherapy experts at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center (MSK) have shown for the first time why some people with pancreatic cancer live many more years than others with the deadly disease.

– Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center

Nature

Embargo expired on 08-Nov-2017 at 13:00 ET


How the Skin Becomes Inflamed

Publishing online this week in Cell Host & Microbe, researchers at Johns Hopkins report the discovery of a key underlying immune mechanism that explains why to how our skin becomes inflamed from conditions such as atopic dermatitis, more commonly kno...

– Johns Hopkins Medicine

Cell Host & Microbe

Embargo expired on 08-Nov-2017 at 12:00 ET


Chronic Stress Hormones May Promote Resistance to EGFR Inhibitors in Lung Cancer Patients

Elevated levels of chronic stress hormones, such as those produced by psychological distress, may promote resistance to drugs commonly used to treat lung cancer patients with EGFR mutations, according to new research from The University of Texas MD A...

– University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center

Science Translational Medicine

Embargo expired on 08-Nov-2017 at 14:00 ET


Researchers Examine Fall Prevention Efforts for Seniors

Two NDSU researchers have published a paper giving high marks to a program designed to help aging adults prevent falls.

– North Dakota State University


Shining a Light on Rural Health in America

Nationwide Observance of National Rural Health Day 2017

– National Organization of State Offices of Rural Health (NOSORH)

Closing the Rural Health Gap: Live Virtual Press Briefing with NOSORH, RWJF, 4-H, and ARC


Adolescents Use Dietary Supplements to Increase Sports Performance and Improve Immunity

Adolescents in developed countries frequently use dietary supplements despite a lack of knowledge about possible harmful effects or drug interactions. Often males turn to dietary supplements in an attempt to increase their performance for sports whil...

– Society for Nutrition Education and Behavior

Journal of Nutrition Education and Behavior


New “Sugar-Glass” Film Uses Viruses to Kill Harmful Bacteria in Food

With antibiotic resistance on the rise, bacterial contamination of food is becoming more problematic. Now in a study appearing in ACS Biomaterials Science & Engineering, scientists report that they have developed an antibacterial “sugar-glass” co...

– American Chemical Society (ACS)

ACS Biomaterials Science & Engineering


Early Breastfeeding Success Not Affected by Epidural Pain Relief With Fentanyl

Including the opioid fentanyl in the solution used to maintain an epidural during childbirth does not appear to affect the success of breastfeeding six weeks after delivery, according to a study published in Anesthesiology, the peer-reviewed medical ...

– American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA)

Anesthesiology


Call for Europe-Wide Screening of Babies for Heart Defects

All babies across Europe should be routinely screened for critical congenital heart defects (CCHD) within 24 hours of their birth, say a group of experts led by a University of Birmingham Professor and Honorary Consultant Neonatologist at Birmingham ...

– University of Birmingham

Lancet Child Adolescent Health


Early Postoperative Fever in Pediatric Patients Rarely Associated With an Infectious Source

Post-operative fevers in children are rarely due to infection, yet they are often subjected to non-targeted testing. This conclusion has been widely recognized in adult patients undergoing surgery, but this is the first large-scale study to verify th...

– Ann & Robert H. Lurie Children's Hospital of Chicago

Journal of Pediatric Surgery


Video of Blood Clot Contraction Reveals How Platelets Naturally Form Unobtrusive Clots

The first view of the physical mechanism of how a blood clot contracts at the level of individual platelets is giving researchers a new look at a natural process that is part of blood clotting. The team describes how specialized proteins in platelet...

– Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania

Nature Communications; National Institutes of Health (U01HL116330, HL090774), a Scientist Development Grant from American Heart Association (17SDG33680

includes video


Scientists Find Missing Clue to How HIV Hacks Cells to Propagate Itself

Computer modeling has helped a team of scientists, including several scholars from the University of Chicago, to decode previously unknown details about the "budding" process by which HIV forces cells to spread the virus to other cells. The findings,...

– University of Chicago

PNAS


Why Do Some Kids Die Under Dental Anesthesia?

Anesthesiologists call for more research into child deaths caused by dental anesthesia in an article published online by the journal Pediatrics. Little is known about pediatric deaths caused by dental anesthesia in part because of the lack of data su...

– University of Illinois at Chicago

Pediatrics


Addressing the Digital Divide—mHealth in Cancer Care

ISPOR, the professional society for health economics and outcomes research (HEOR), held an issue panel this afternoon that focused on mHealth in cancer care at its 20th Annual European Congress in Glasgow, Scotland, UK.

– International Society for Pharmacoeconomics and Outcomes Research (ISPOR)

ISPOR 20th Annual European Congress, Nov-2017


Including the Patient Perspective in Health Care Decision Making

ISPOR, the professional society for health economics and outcomes research, held a number of sessions focused on patient engagement at its 20th Annual European Congress in Glasgow, Scotland, UK.

– International Society for Pharmacoeconomics and Outcomes Research (ISPOR)

ISPOR 20th Annual European Congress, Nov-2017


The Evolving Assessment of “Value” in Health Care

ISPOR, the professional society for health economics and outcomes research,held the third plenary session, “Evolution of Value: Perspectives From Both Sides of the Atlantic” at its 20th Annual European Congress in Glasgow, Scotland, UK this morni...

– International Society for Pharmacoeconomics and Outcomes Research (ISPOR)

ISPOR 20th Annual European Congress, Nov-2017


Real-World Evidence in Health Care Decision Making

ISPOR, the professional society for health economics and outcomes research, held several sessions on the topic of real-world evidence at its 20th Annual European Congress currently being held 4-8 November 2017 in Glasgow, Scotland, UK.

– International Society for Pharmacoeconomics and Outcomes Research (ISPOR)

ISPOR 20th Annual European Congress, Nov-2017


The Changing Landscape for Medical Devices

ISPOR, the professional society for health economics and outcomes research, held several sessions on the topic of medical devices at its 20th Annual European Congress currently being held 4-8 November 2017 in Glasgow, Scotland, UK.

– International Society for Pharmacoeconomics and Outcomes Research (ISPOR)

ISPOR 20th Annual European Congress, Nov-2017


Could Scalpel-Free Surgery Help the Body Destroy Metastatic Breast Cancer?

UVA is testing the power of focused ultrasound and immunotherapy to enable the body to identify and destroy metastatic breast cancer cells.

– University of Virginia Health System


Nurses Partner with Families for a Healthy Future

The program focuses on first-time mothers because it is during a first pregnancy that the best chance exists to promote and teach positive and enduring behaviors between a mother and her baby.

– University of Alabama at Birmingham


New Gene Therapy Trial for Severe Neuromuscular Disorder in Children

Ann & Robert H. Lurie Children’s Hospital of Chicago is one of the few centers participating in ASPIRO, an international Phase 1/2 clinical trial of a gene therapy product called AT132 for X-linked myotubular myopathy – a rare disease characteriz...

– Ann & Robert H. Lurie Children's Hospital of Chicago


Participation in Clinical Trials Improves Diabetes Care

The development of new therapies and cures would be impossible without patients volunteering for clinical research studies. In exchange, volunteers often receive care based on the latest research, while gaining the satisfaction of helping others. Tha...

– NIH, National Eye Institute (NEI)


The Medical Minute: Safe Cooking Over the Holidays

Holding the title of household chef or Thanksgiving host doesn’t bring automatic food safety knowledge – especially when transforming a several-pound piece of poultry into the centerpiece of mouthwatering meal.

– Penn State Health Milton S. Hershey Medical Center

07-Nov-2017


Increasing Rates of Chronic Conditions Putting More Moms, Babies at Risk

Pregnant women today are more likely to have chronic conditions that could cause life-threatening complications than at any other time in the past decade – particularly poor women and those living in rural communities.

– Michigan Medicine - University of Michigan

The Green Journal

Embargo expired on 07-Nov-2017 at 17:00 ET


Neuroscientists Find Promise in Intervention to Normalize Biological Functions in Fragile X Mice

A team of neuroscientists have developed an intervention that normalizes multiple biological functions in mice afflicted with Fragile X Syndrome.

– New York University

Science Signaling

Embargo expired on 07-Nov-2017 at 14:00 ET


Drug Hospitalizations Increase Even as Prescription Opioid Supply Declines

Preliminary research presented today at APHA’s 2017 Annual Meeting and Expo examined the trend in hospitalizations from opioid poisonings in West Virginia, a state heavily impacted by the current opioid overdose crisis.

– American Public Health Association (APHA)

APHA’s 2017 Annual Meeting and Expo

Embargo expired on 07-Nov-2017 at 00:05 ET


Tiny Worms May Offer New Clues About Why It's So Hard to Quit Smoking

Researchers at the University of Michigan Life Sciences Institute found that a previously dismissed genetic mechanism may contribute to nicotine dependence, and to the withdrawal effects that can make quitting smoking so difficult.

– University of Michigan

Cell Reports

Embargo expired on 07-Nov-2017 at 12:00 ET


Penn Study Shows Nearly 70 Percent of Cannabidiol Extracts Sold Online Are Mislabeled

Business experts estimate that the market for Cannabidiol (CBD) products will grow to more than $2 billion in consumer sales within the next three years. While interest in this area continues to grow, little has been done to ensure regulation and ove...

– Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania

JAMA

Embargo expired on 07-Nov-2017 at 11:00 ET


Two Meds Not Always Better than One for Seasonal Allergic Rhinitis

n a newly updated clinical practice guideline, allergists offer practical advice on the best types and amounts of medications to treat seasonal allergic rhinitis.

– American College of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology (ACAAI)

Annals of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology

Embargo expired on 07-Nov-2017 at 00:00 ET


Out of Balance: Gut Bacterial Makeup May Exacerbate Pain in Sickle Cell Disease

An overabundance of the bacteria Veillonella in the digestive tract may increase pain in patients with sickle cell disease (SCD). Researchers from Howard University will present their findings today at the American Physiological Society’s Physiolog...

– American Physiological Society (APS)

Physiological and Pathophysiological Consequences of Sickle Cell Disease

Embargo expired on 07-Nov-2017 at 14:00 ET


Energy Drinks Influence Alcohol-Induced Body Imbalance

Heavy drinking impairs balance and motor coordination, which is why increased body sway is a useful indicator to both police and bartenders that a person may be intoxicated. People often drink alcohol at the same time that they ingest stimulant drugs...

– Research Society on Alcoholism

Alcoholism: Clinical and Experimental Research

Embargo expired on 07-Nov-2017 at 10:00 ET


Gene Marker Could Identify Sickle Cell Patients with Highest Risk of Complications

Researchers have found a genotype that could help identify sickle cell disease (SCD) patients at greatest risk of developing disease-related complications. The findings will be presented at the APS Physiological and Pathophysiological Consequences of...

– American Physiological Society (APS)

Physiological and Pathophysiological Consequences of Sickle Cell Disease conference

Embargo expired on 07-Nov-2017 at 10:00 ET


How SORLA Protects Against Alzheimer’s Disease

Researchers have identified a new protective function for a brain protein genetically linked to Alzheimer’s. The findings, published in the Journal of Experimental Medicine, could inform novel treatment strategies to combat neurodegenerative diseas...

– Sanford Burnham Prebys Medical Discovery Institute

Journal of Experimental Medicine; R01AG021173; R01AG038710,; R01AG044420; R01NS046673

Embargo expired on 07-Nov-2017 at 09:00 ET

includes video


HIV Patients at Greater Risk of Both Heart and Kidney Disease

HIV patients and their doctors are urged to be more aware of the additional health risks associated with treated HIV infection. This follows new research that shows HIV patients at high risk for a heart attack or stroke are also at substantially grea...

– University of Adelaide

PLOS Medicine

Embargo expired on 07-Nov-2017 at 14:00 ET


IUDs May Have a Surprising Benefit: Protection Against Cervical Cancer

A new study from the Keck School of Medicine of USC has found that IUD use is associated with a dramatic decrease in the incidence of cervical cancer.

– Keck Medicine of USC

Obstetrics & Gynecology


Inner Ear Stem Cells May Someday Restore Hearing

Want to restore hearing by injecting stem cells into the inner ear? Well, that can be a double-edged sword. Inner ear stem cells can be converted to auditory neurons that could reverse deafness, but the process can also make those cells divide too qu...

– Rutgers University-New Brunswick

Stem Cell Reports ; Rutgers Today


Circulating Tumor Cells Associated with Relapse in Late-Stage Melanoma Patients

A study revealing a connection between circulating tumor cells (CTCs) and relapse in stage IV melanoma patients points to liquid biopsy as a potential predictor of patients at high risk for disease progression. CTCs, tumor cells shed into the bloodst...

– University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center

Lancet Oncology; Western Surgical Association Annual Meeting, Nov. 4-7, 2017


Promising New Drug for Hepatitis B Tested First at Texas Biomedical Research Institute’s National Primate Research Center in San Antonio

Research at the Southwest National Primate Research Center (SNPRC) on the campus of Texas Biomedical Research Institute helped advance a new treatment now in human trials for chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection.

– Texas Biomedical Research Institute

Science Translational Medicine


Big Data Resources for Public Health

Although studies and surveys have shown that using information technology to analyze big health datasets and guide public health decisions can improve health equity, the majority of community health center leaders and staff report receiving little to...

– Health Sciences at the University of Pittsburgh

U.S. Health Resources & Services Administration


JACR Explores Social Media Impact on Medicine

It’s a social networking world! The Journal of the American College of Radiology (JACR®) will examine its influence on medical journals and professional meetings, radiology education and health care organizations in an upcoming special issue.

– American College of Radiology (ACR)


UF Study Helps Discount Fluoride as a Danger for Tea Drinkers

If you drink too much tea, scientists are concerned you might get sick from dental fluorosis in children or skeletal fluorosis in adults. The situation can be aggravated if water used for brewing tea contains high amounts of fluoride.

– University of Florida Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences

Environmental Pollution


Lending Late Neurons a Helping Hand

University of Geneva researchers have discovered that delayed neuronal migration in the foetus causes behavioural disorders comparable to autism.

– Université de Genève (University of Geneva)

Nature Communications


Bacteria May Help Babies’ Digestive Tracts More Than Suspected, Scientists Find

Some of the first living things to greet a newborn baby do a lot more than coo or cuddle. In fact, they may actually help the little one’s digestive system prepare for a lifetime of fighting off dangerous germs. But these living things aren’t pa...

– Michigan Medicine - University of Michigan

eLife 2017; AI116482; DK103141; AI007528; TR000433


Keeping Harsh Punishment in Check Helps Kids with ADHD, Study Finds

Cutting back on yelling, criticism and other harsh parenting approaches, including physical punishment, has the power to calm children with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, according to a new study.

– Ohio State University

Clinical Psychological Science


Study Outlines ‘Perfect Storm’ That Led to Colombia’s Antibiotic Resistance Epidemic

The nearly simultaneous emergence of a gene responsible for producing carbapenemases - enzymes that kill the most powerful antibiotics used against life-threatening, multidrug-resistant bacterial infections - coupled with the introduction of a bacter...

– University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston

Journal of Infectious Diseases


Weight Bias May Impede Care for Patients with Obesity

If ignored, healthcare providers' biases and misconceptions may impede how patients with obesity are diagnosed and cared for, leading to poor patient outcomes, according to an article in the journal AACN Advanced Critical Care.

– American Association of Critical-Care Nurses (AACN)

AACN Advanced Critical Care, Fall 2017


Healthiest College Students Keep Weight Down, Spirits Up

Research shows that optimists and happy people are healthier overall, enjoying lower blood pressure and less depression and anxiety, among other measures.

– University of Michigan

Biomedical Journal of Scientific and Technical Research


SLU Researcher Draws Bulls Eye Around Muscular Dystrophy Drug Targets

Saint Louis University scientist Francis M. Sverdrup, Ph.D., studies an inherited type of muscular dystrophy that typically begins with weakness in the face and shoulders before spreading to all skeletal muscles.

– Saint Louis University Medical Center

Skeletal Muscle


Study Finds a New Way to Shut Down Cancer Cells’ Ability to Consume Glucose

Many cancers depend on glucose consumption for energy, but good pharmacological targets to stop cancers’ ability to uptake and metabolize glucose are missing. CU Cancer Center study finally identifies a way to restrict the ability of cancer to use ...

– University of Colorado Cancer Center

Cell Reports


Can Virtual Reality Be Used to Manage Pain at a Pediatric Hospital?

In a study conducted to determine if virtual reality (VR) can be effectively used for pain management during medical procedures such as blood draw, findings showed that VR significantly reduced patients’ and parents’ perception of acute pain, anx...

– Childrens Hospital Los Angeles

Journal of Pediatric Psychology, Oct-2017


New Study Points to Risks from Mislabeled Unregulated Cannabidiol Products

Study findings highlight need for manufacturing and testing standards and federal government oversight.

– RTI International

JAMA


New Model Reveals Possibility of Pumping Antibiotics Into Bacteria

Researchers in the University of Wisconsin–Madison Department of Biochemistry have discovered that a cellular pump known to move drugs like antibiotics out of E. coli bacteria has the potential to bring them in as well, opening new lines of researc...

– University of Wisconsin-Madison

Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences


Targeting a microRNA Shows Potential to Enhance Effectiveness of Diabetes Drugs

Researchers have found a vital role for miR-204 in beta cells — regulating the cell surface receptor that is the target of many of the newer type 2 diabetes drugs, such as Byetta, Victoza, Trulicity, Januvia, Onglyza and Tradjenta. This drug target...

– University of Alabama at Birmingham

Diabetes; DK078752 ; DK104204; 3-SRA-2014-302-M-R


Lessons from Marine Sponges Could Lead to Novel Glass Technology

Israeli and German scientists have uncovered some clues about the abilities of some marine creatures to form glass structures in cold water. The findings could lead to nature-inspired recipes for creating novel glass technologies at room temperature....

– American Technion Society

Science Advances, Oct-2018


After Repeated C. diff Infections, People Change Their Behaviors

After suffering repeated bouts of debilitating Clostridium difficile infections, many patients significantly change their behaviors, but some precautions may do little to prevent future infections, according to a first-of-its-kind study.

– Loyola University Health System

Infection Control and Hospital Epidemiology


Digital Storytelling Helps Encourage Latinas to Seek Therapy for Depression and Anxiety

A UCLA Nursing professor has found that culturally tailored multimedia content holds great promise for encouraging Latina women to seek help for, and address the symptoms of, anxiety and depression.

– UCLA School of Nursing

JMIR Mental Health

includes video


ISPOR Establishes New “Women in Health Economics and Outcomes Research” Initiative

ISPOR, the professional society for health economics and outcomes research (HEOR), held an open meeting this afternoon designed to gain member feedback on a new initiative, “ISPOR Women in HEOR/Science.”

– International Society for Pharmacoeconomics and Outcomes Research (ISPOR)

ISPOR 20th Annual European Congress, Nov-2017


What Is the Future of Health Technology Assessment in Europe?

ISPOR, the professional society for health economics and outcomes research, held the second plenary session, “Appraising the Appraisers: What Is the Future of Health Technology Assessment in Europe?” this morning at its 20th Annual European Congr...

– International Society for Pharmacoeconomics and Outcomes Research (ISPOR)

ISPOR 20th Annual European Congress, Nov-2017


Cedars-Sinai Taps Military Veteran to Recruit and Retain Former Members of the Military and Their Spouses

“I want every organization to know Cedars-Sinai is serious about hiring veterans,” said Stephen Bettini, a former Army combat engineer who now serves as Cedars-Sinai’s first full-time military veteran recruiter, a new position to help veterans ...

– Cedars-Sinai


Paving a New Path to Parenthood: Penn Medicine Launches First Clinical Trial for Uterine Transplant in the Northeast

Penn Medicine will conduct the Northeast’s first clinical trial of uterine transplants, to provide women with Uterine Factor Infertility (UFI) - an irreversible form of female infertility that affects as many as 5 percent of women worldwide and 50,...

– Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania


The SAD Season is Upon Us

The SAD season is upon us. Seasonal affective disorder (SAD) is a type of depression triggered by shorter days and reduced light. “We are in the midst of the full-blown SAD season,” said said Loyola Medicine psychiatrist Angelos Halaris, MD, PhD....

– Loyola University Health System

06-Nov-2017


Fat Hormone Linked to Progression of Fatty Liver Disease May Hold Key to New Treatments

The rising obesity epidemic has brought with it an army of maladies. One, in particular, is threatening to outpace many of the disorders that accompany obesity, in terms of occurrence and severity: nonalcoholic fatty liver disease.

– University of Michigan

Journal of Clinical Investigation

Embargo expired on 06-Nov-2017 at 16:00 ET


Researchers Report First-Ever Protein Hydrogels Made in Living Cells

Johns Hopkins cell biologists report what they believe is the first-ever creation of tiny protein-based gelatin-like clumps called hydrogels inside living cells. The ability to create hydrogels on demand, they say, should advance the long scientific ...

– Johns Hopkins Medicine

Nature Materials; GM092930, DK102910, CA103175, DK089502, T32GM007445, CCF-1217213

Embargo expired on 06-Nov-2017 at 11:00 ET


Blame Tired Brain Cells for Mental Lapses After Poor Sleep

A UCLA study is the first to reveal how sleep deprivation disrupts brain cells’ ability to communicate with each other, leading to temporary mental lapses that affect memory and visual perception.

– University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA), Health Sciences

Nature Medicine Nov. 6, 2017

Embargo expired on 06-Nov-2017 at 11:00 ET

includes video


Microfinance Institutions Are Found Effective in Delivering Essential Health Products to Underserved Communities on a National Scale While Reducing Costs

New research from The Arnhold Institute for Global Health at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, suggests that the capabilities of microfinance networks expand well beyond banking, and that tapping into these networks can bring measurable he...

– Mount Sinai Health System

Health Affairs

Embargo expired on 06-Nov-2017 at 16:00 ET


Penn Study Pinpoints H3N2 Mutation in Last Year’s Flu Vaccine as Responsible for Lowered Efficacy

The below average efficacy of last year’s influenza vaccine (which was only 20 to 30 percent effective) can be attributed to a mutation in the H3N2 strain, a new study reports. With the mutation, most people receiving the egg-grown vaccine did not ...

– Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania

Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences; R01AI113047, R01AI108686, DP2AI117921

Embargo expired on 06-Nov-2017 at 15:00 ET


Stress, Fear of Pain May Be Cause of Painful Sickle Cell Episodes

Mental stress and the anticipation of pain may cause blood vessels to narrow and trigger episodes of severe pain (vaso-occlusive crisis, or VOC) in sickle cell disease (SCD). A team of researchers from California will present their findings today at ...

– American Physiological Society (APS)

Physiological and Pathophysiological Consequences of Sickle Cell Disease

Embargo expired on 06-Nov-2017 at 18:45 ET


Alzheimer’s Drug Elicits Quality of Life, Red Blood Cell Function Improvements in Sickle Cell Patients

A popular drug commonly used to treat Alzheimer’s disease has shown promise in laboratory and clinical trials for treating patients with sickle cell disease (SCD). Researchers have found that the molecule memantine stabilizes the development, longe...

– American Physiological Society (APS)

Physiological and Pathophysiological Consequences of Sickle Cell Disease

Embargo expired on 06-Nov-2017 at 18:45 ET


Immune Cells Mistake Heart Attacks for Viral Infections

A study led by Kevin King, a bioengineer and physician at the University of California San Diego, has found that the immune system plays a surprising role in the aftermath of heart attacks. The research could lead to new therapeutic strategies for h...

– University of California San Diego

Nature Medicine

Embargo expired on 06-Nov-2017 at 11:00 ET


UHN Vision Scientists Discover Potential Neuroprotective Treatment for Glaucoma

A research team led by scientists at the Krembil Research Institute in Toronto has identified a new neuroprotective factor that has the potential to help people suffering from the common blinding disease glaucoma.

– University Health Network (UHN)

Journal of Clinical Investigation, Nov-2017

Embargo expired on 06-Nov-2017 at 16:00 ET


Lipids Influence How Sick You Get From a Bacterial Infection

Researchers from the University of Maryland, Baltimore and the University of Maastricht deomonstrated their ability to use mass spectrometry imaging (MSI) in tracking disease progression, opening avenues for future research into the applicability of...

– University of Maryland, Baltimore

PNAS MS# 2017-12887R

Embargo expired on 06-Nov-2017 at 15:00 ET


Study Shows Lupus Support Line has Positive Impact

A free telephone support and education program for people with lupus is a valuable resource to help them cope with the disease, according to a study at Hospital for Special Surgery (HSS) in New York City.

– Hospital for Special Surgery

Embargo expired on 06-Nov-2017 at 13:30 ET


Researchers Probe Brain Disease-Causing Proteins at the Atomic Level

Researchers studying a protein that causes a hereditary degenerative brain disease in humans have discovered that the human, mouse and hamster forms of the protein, which have nearly identical amino acid sequences, exhibit distinct three-dimensional ...

– Ohio State University

Nature Communications


Researchers Discover Eight New Epilepsy Genes

A new study examining 200 children with epileptic encephalopathy – epilepsy combined with intellectual or overall developmental disability –identified eight new genes involved in this type of epilepsy thanks to their use of whole-genome sequencin...

– Universite de Montreal

The American Journal of Human Genetics; Genome Canada; Genome Quebec; Jeanne and Jean-Louis Lévesque Research Chair on the genetic basis of brain diseases


High Risk Sex Behaviors Impact Women’s Health: Mcmaster

The research team compared samples of vaginal microbiota of both women who were involved in sex work and those who were not sex workers in Nairobi, Kenya.

– McMaster University


Solvent Exposure Linked to High Blood Pressure in Hispanic Workers

Hispanic/Latino workers exposed to organic solvents are more likely to have high blood pressure, according to a study in the November Journal of Occupational and Environmental Medicine.

– Wolters Kluwer Health: Lippincott Williams and Wilkins

Journal of Occupational and Environmental Medicine


Age-Old Malaria Treatment Found to Improve Nanoparticle Delivery to Tumors

A new study shows that a 70-year-old malaria drug can block immune cells in the liver so nanoparticles can arrive at their intended tumor site, overcoming a significant hurdle of targeted drug delivery, according to a team of researchers led by Houst...

– Houston Methodist

Scientific Reports, Oct. 23


Study: Lupus Patients Endorse PROMIS Assessment Tool as Relevant and Valuable

A study at Hospital for Special Surgery (HSS) evaluating the Patient Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System (PROMIS) finds that patients with lupus endorse the assessment tool as relevant, valuable and potentially useful in improving clini...

– Hospital for Special Surgery


Depressed with a Chronic Disease? Consider Alternative Therapies

Scientists are finding more evidence that commonly prescribed antidepressants aren’t effective in people battling both depression and a chronic medical disease, raising a critical question of whether doctors should enact widespread changes in how t...

– UT Southwestern Medical Center

Journal of the American Medical Association


Researchers Discover New Pathway for Handling Stress

Researchers studying how animals respond to infections have found a new pathway that may help in tolerating stressors that damage proteins. Naming the pathway the Intracellular Pathogen Response, the scientists say it is a newly discovered way for an...

– University of California San Diego

Current Biology, Nov-2017


Huntsman Cancer Institute Study Identifies Enhanced Impact of Treatment for Hereditary Cancer Patients

eople with an inherited syndrome called familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP) have a 100% lifetime risk of developing colorectal cancer if they do not seek appropriate medical care. Recent findings published by researchers at Huntsman Cancer Institute...

– Huntsman Cancer Institute at the University of Utah

HHSN2612012000131; CA042014; CA073992; UL1TR00106


Drug Improves Muscle Function and Survival in Spinal Muscular Atrophy

More than half of the babies with infantile-onset spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) who were treated with nusinersen (Spinraza) gained motor milestones, compared to none of the babies in the control group. Infants treated with the drug also had 63 percen...

– Ann & Robert H. Lurie Children's Hospital of Chicago

New England Journal of Medicine, Nov 2017


Showing How Light Moves in Scintillators Could Help Enhance Medical Imaging

Scientists have not been able to describe how light moves within nontransparent scintillators – a key component in large area x-ray detectors. Now a new study describes how this light moves, a finding that may help to improve medical imaging.

– Stony Brook University

SPIE


Important New Insights Into RECIST Criteria Measuring Cancer’s Response to Treatment

CU Cancer Center study examines current RECIST guidelines in an effort to bring them up to speed with new complexities presented by the latest targeted therapies.

– University of Colorado Cancer Center

Journal of Thoracic Oncology


Higher Estrogen Levels Linked to Increased Alcohol Sensitivity in Brain’s ‘Reward Center’

The reward center of the brain is much more attuned to the pleasurable effects of alcohol when estrogen levels are elevated, an effect that may underlie the development of addiction in women, according to a study on mice at the University of Illinois...

– University of Illinois at Chicago

PLOS ONE


UCI Review Points to Long-Term Negative Impact of High Protein Diets

High protein diets may lead to long-term kidney damage among those suffering from chronic chronic kidney disease, according to research led by nephrologist Kamyar Kalantar-Zadeh, MD, MPH, PhD, of the University of California, Irvine.

– University of California, Irvine

New England Journal of Medicine


Orphan Drugs—Exploring the Challenges of Pricing, Reimbursement, and Funding

ISPOR, the professional society for health economics and outcomes research, held several sessions on the topic of orphan drugs at its 20th Annual European Congress, currently being held 4-8 November 2017 in Glasgow, Scotland, UK.

– International Society for Pharmacoeconomics and Outcomes Research (ISPOR)

ISPOR 20th Annual European Congress, Nov-2017


What Is “Unmet Medical Need?”

ISPOR, the professional society for health economics and outcomes research, held a session this afternoon at its 20th Annual European Congress in Glasgow, Scotland, UK that explored the question, “what is ‘unmet medical need?’”

– International Society for Pharmacoeconomics and Outcomes Research (ISPOR)

ISPOR 20th Annual European Congress, Nov-2017


How Can Good Research Practice Guidance Improve Health Technology Assessment?

ISPOR, the professional society for health economics and outcomes research, focused on what aspects of health technology assessment can be improved with good research practice guidance at its 20th Annual European Congress in Glasgow, Scotland, UK..

– International Society for Pharmacoeconomics and Outcomes Research (ISPOR)

ISPOR 20th Annual European Congress, Nov-2017


Finding the “Value” in Value-Based Health Care

ISPOR, the professional society for health economics and outcomes research, opened its 20th Annual European Congress in Glasgow, Scotland, UK this morning with the first plenary session, “Where Is the Value in Value-Based Health Care?.”

– International Society for Pharmacoeconomics and Outcomes Research (ISPOR)

ISPOR 20th Annual European Congress, Nov-2017


Do Face Masks Protect Against Air Pollution-Related Health Problems?

Many people around the world, especially in Asia, wear face masks to protect against air pollution. Do they work? Sanjay Rajagopalan, MD, Herman Hellerstein, professor of cardiovascular medicine at Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine a...

– Case Western Reserve University

National Institutes of Health


Study Finds Racial Disparities in Hip Replacement Outcomes in Impoverished Communities

A combination of race and socioeconomic factors play a role in hip replacement outcomes, according to a study at Hospital for Special Surgery (HSS).

– Hospital for Special Surgery

Association of Rheumatology Health Professionals annual meeting


Academy of Rheumatology Medical Educators at Hospital for Special Surgery Fosters Innovation in Teaching and Research to Improve Medical Care

The Academy of Rheumatology Medical Educators at Hospital for Special Surgery (HSS) has created a stimulating academic environment for educators, promoted teaching excellence and supported innovative research in rheumatology education.

– Hospital for Special Surgery

Association of Rheumatology Health Professionals (ARHP) annual meeting


Mayo Clinic Releases Book on Whole-Body Wellness, Complementary Techniques

ROCHESTER, Minn. – A new Mayo Clinic book ─ Mayo Clinic: The Integrative Guide to Good Health – is now available. This book highlights the importance of mental and spiritual wellness when maintaining an individual’s overall health.

– Mayo Clinic

MedWire Policy and Public Affairs


ASTRO Chair to Testify at Energy & Commerce Hearing on Medicare Payment Reform

ASTRO Chair Brian Kavanagh, MD, MPH, FASTRO, will join representatives from leading physician groups Wednesday morning to discuss Medicare payment reform before the House Energy and Commerce Subcommittee on Health. The hearing, “MACRA and Alternat...

– American Society for Radiation Oncology (ASTRO)

MedWire Announcements


Best Podium and Poster Presentations Awarded at ISPOR 20th Annual European Congress

ISPOR, the professional society for health economics and outcomes research (HEOR), recognized the Best Podium and Poster Presentation Awardees from its 20th Annual European Congress held in Glasgow, Scotland, UK 4-8 November 2017.

– International Society for Pharmacoeconomics and Outcomes Research (ISPOR)

ISPOR 20th Annual European Congress, Nov-2017


A New, Harmonized Approach Takes a Stand against Rising Rates and Poor Outcomes for Cancer in Sub-Saharan Africa

National Comprehensive Cancer Network introduces targeted regional resources created in collaboration with the African Cancer Coalition, the American Cancer Society, and the Clinton Health Access Initiative.

– National Comprehensive Cancer Network® (NCCN®)

Embargo expired on 08-Nov-2017 at 04:00 ET


Hackensack Meridian Health Riverview Medical Center Welcomes Dara Fedele, M.D., Diagnostic Radiologist

Riverview Medical Center in Red Bank, NJ is pleased to welcome diagnostic radiologist, Dara Fedele, M.D., to the medical staff.

– Hackensack Meridian Health


Researchers Put Youth Sports Safety and Concussion Awareness Ahead of the Game With Novel Program

Seattle Children’s researchers will launch an innovative program in early 2018 aimed at shifting the culture of safety in youth sports and building concussion awareness during competitive play with the help of pre-game safety huddles.

– Seattle Children's Hospital


Hackensack Meridian Health Bayshore Medical Center Foundation Raises More Than $175,000 at Annual Benefit for Bayshore Oktoberfest Celebration

Hackensack Meridian Health Bayshore Medical Center Foundation hosted the second annual Benefit for Bayshore Oktoberfest Community Celebration on Friday, October 13 and raised more than $175,000 in support of the hospital. The outdoor, tented cocktail...

– Hackensack Meridian Health


Baylor Scott & White Health Strengthens Executive Leadership Team with New Hire and Promotions

Baylor Scott & White Health – the largest not-for-profit healthcare system in Texas — announced several key additions to its executive leadership team. All four women bring a wealth of experience to their new positions and will play vital roles i...

– Baylor Scott and White Health


Professor Nancy Glass Named Johns Hopkins School of Nursing Endowed Chair

Researcher, clinician, educator, and public health advocate Nancy Glass, PhD, MPH, RN, FAAN, has been named the Independence Foundation Chair in Nursing Education at the Johns Hopkins School of Nursing(JHSON). Glass is a professor and associate direc...

– Johns Hopkins School of Nursing


New Research Fellowship in IPF Funded by Boehringer Ingelheim Pharmaceuticals, Inc.

The ATS Foundation continues to support researchers committed to improving the lives of patients with respiratory disease. Today, the Foundation announces its new ATS Foundation/Boehringer Ingelheim Research Fellowship in idiopathic pulmonary fibrosi...

– American Thoracic Society (ATS)


Hackensack Meridian Health Riverview Medical Center Offers Surgical Clinic for Under and Uninsured Community Members

Hackensack Meridian Health Riverview Medical Center now offers specialized surgical services for specific conditions to community members with Medicaid, Charity Care, Horizon NJ Health and United Health Care Family plans.

– Hackensack Meridian Health


McMaster Cultivates Medicinal Cannabis Knowledge

The multidisciplinary Michael G. DeGroote Centre for Medicinal Cannabis Research (CMCR) will focus on conducting research, sharing evidence-based information and creating a network of professionals interested in further understanding medicinal cannab...

– McMaster University


New Multidisciplinary Liver Tumor Program Targets Liver Cancer

Perlmutter Cancer Center introduces new liver tumor program to tackle liver and biliary cancers and tumors.

– NYU Langone Health


American Autoimmune Related Diseases Association (AARDA) Joins the Global #GivingTuesday Movement

American Autoimmune Related Diseases Association (AARDA) has joined #GivingTuesday, a global day of giving that harnesses the collective power of individuals, communities, and organizations to encourage philanthropy and to celebrate generosity worldw...

– American Autoimmune Related Diseases Association (AARDA)


Neurosurgery Research & Education Foundation Announces New Cerebrovascular Traveling Observerships

The Joint Cerebrovascular Section Traveling Fellowship will allow a practicing, CAST-certified neurointerventionalist to visit a high-volume cerebrovascular center for a one-week observership.

– American Association of Neurological Surgeons (AANS)


Loyola Receives Stroke Gold Plus Quality Achievement Award for Ninth Year in a Row

For the ninth year in a row, Loyola University Medical Center has received the American Heart Association/American Stroke Association's Get With The Guidelines®-Stroke Gold Plus Quality Achievement Award.

– Loyola University Health System


MD Anderson’s Moon Shots Program Celebrates Five-Year Anniversary

The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center celebrates the five-year anniversary of its Moon Shots Program™, a collaborative effort to accelerate the development of scientific discoveries into clinical advances that save patients’ lives. La...

– University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center

Embargo expired on 06-Nov-2017 at 11:00 ET


ASCB Among Founding Members of Newly Launched Scientific Society Publisher Alliance

A group of prestigious not-for-profit scientific membership societies, including the American Society for Cell Biology (ASCB), have announced the launch of the Scientific Society Publisher Alliance (SSPA), an initiative focused on building awareness ...

– American Society for Cell Biology (ASCB)


Columbia Nursing’s Marie Carmel Garcon Named Nurse Practitioner of the Year by The Nurse Practitioner Association New York State

New York, NY- Marie Carmel Garcon, DNP, Columbia University School of Nursing, has been named 2017 Nurse Practitioner of the Year, by The Nurse Practitioner Association (link is external) New York State (NPA).

– Columbia University Medical Center


NIH Funds Research to Fight Alzheimer’s Disease with Anti-Inflammatory Diet

The National Institutes of Health has awarded Albert Einstein College of Medicine nutrition scientist Yasmin Mossavar-Rahmani, Ph.D., R.D., a five-year, $4 million grant to test whether a diet rich in foods with anti-inflammatory properties can reduc...

– Albert Einstein College of Medicine

R01AG055527


Mount Sinai Researchers Receive NIH Grant to Develop New Ways to Share and Reuse Research Data

NIH Data Commons Pilot Phase to seek best practices for storing, accessing, sharing and computing on biomedical data

– Mount Sinai Health System


Women Needed to Contribute to WISDOM for Breast Cancer Screening

The five University of California medical centers, including Moores Cancer Center at UC San Diego Health, have joined together to recruit 100,000 women in California to be part of WISDOM: a clinical trial to uncover whether annual mammograms are the ...

– University of California San Diego Health


The Wistar Institute Awarded More Than $16.5M in Grants to Fund Cancer & Infectious Disease Research and Training

Wistar scientists have secured more than $16.5 million in funding throughout the summer and early fall of 2017.

– Wistar Institute


FDA Announces First Approval of Targeted Therapy Based on Basket Study

The US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has announced that it has approved the drug vemurafenib for the treatment of patients with BRAF V600-mutant Erdheim-Chester disease (ECD). This is the first approval of a targeted therapy based on a basket st...

– Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center


Trained T-Cells to Target Toxic Viruses in Pediatric Patients

Children’s Hospital Los Angeles has been awarded $4.8 million by the California Institute for Regenerative Medicine (CIRM) to study the use of a new T-cell therapy to help fight active viral infections in children with severe immune deficiencies. ...

– Childrens Hospital Los Angeles


Integrating Pathology and Radiology Images to Improve Cancer Treatment

Stony Brook University is part of a national five-year $8 million grant from the National Cancer Institute (NCI) to develop a testbed for using data analytics and radiology and pathology images to better steer cancer treatment.

– Stony Brook University


Hackensack Meridian Health Riverview Medical Center Brings National Effort to Improve Health and Reduce Costs to Red Bank

As research increasingly links environmental factors with chronic disease, Hackensack Meridian Health Riverview Medical Center has enrolled in the Healthier Hospitals Initiative (HHI), a national campaign that supports hospitals in accelerating the g...

– Hackensack Meridian Health


Ludwig Scientists Share Insights on Immunotherapy Research at the 2017 Society for Immunotherapy of Cancer Annual Meeting

Ludwig Cancer Research has released the scope of its participation at the 2017 Society for Immunotherapy of Cancer (SITC) Annual Meeting in National Harbor, Maryland, November 8-12.

– Ludwig Cancer Research


Two Mount Sinai Institutes to Join $215 Million Public-Private Partnership to Increase Patients’ Immunotherapy Success

The Tisch Cancer Institute and the Precision Immunology Institute at Mount Sinai Health System are part of a $215 million public-private Cancer Moonshot research collaboration launched by the National Institutes of Health and 11 leading pharmaceutica...

– Mount Sinai Health System

MedWire Marketplace


B-Line Medical hosts 3rd Annual Client Symposium with Record Breaking number of Attendees

B-Line Medical, an industry leader in video-driven healthcare education and outcome improvement, is happy to announce they hosted their 3rd Annual Symposium, which was held on October 25th-27th in Washington D.C.

– B-Line Medical

MedWire Marketplace


Sepsis: The Body’s Deadly Response to Infection

Although not as well-known as other medical conditions, sepsis kills more people in the United States than AIDS, breast cancer, or prostate cancer combined. Sepsis is body-wide inflammation, usually triggered by an overwhelming immune response to inf...

– NIH, National Institute of General Medical Sciences (NIGMS)

includes video


People Who Commit Genocide Are Not Evil

Hollie Nyseth Brehm, assistant professor of sociology and criminology at The Ohio State University, talks about her research in genocide, http://go.osu.edu/geno

– Ohio State University

includes video

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