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Newswise MedWire - Medical News for Journalists
Newswise MedWire
Thursday, February 15, 2018

Public Edition | newswise.com

Medical
(123 New)
 

Medical News

15-Feb-2018


Rest Is the Best Medicine

Concussion is a common diagnosis in sports medicine. Many providers use medication to target the residual symptoms of a concussion, although there are currently no medications that have been approved by the Federal Drug Administration for the treatme...

– Association of Academic Physiatrists (AAP)

Association of Academic Physiatrists’ Annual Meeting

Embargo expired on 15-Feb-2018 at 08:00 ET


Ballet Builds Functional Improvements in Children with Musculoskeletal and Neurologic Conditions

While great strides have been made in adaptive sports, few opportunities exist in the arts for the disabled population. This study evaluated the impact of an adaptive ballet dance program on children with physical impairments. The study shows that an...

– Association of Academic Physiatrists (AAP)

Physiatrists Annual Meeting

Embargo expired on 15-Feb-2018 at 08:00 ET


What’s Holding You Back?

Individuals with disabilities face barriers to physical activity, recreation, and sport. The goal of this study was to determine whether the perception of these barriers differs among those with and without a disability. Second, it aims to determine ...

– Association of Academic Physiatrists (AAP)

Physiatrists Annual Meeting

Embargo expired on 15-Feb-2018 at 08:00 ET


Clues to Predict Injury Recovery

This study investigates the influence of dopamine pathway (DA) genes on self-reported quality of life (QOL) after moderate-to-severe traumatic brain injury (TBI).

– Association of Academic Physiatrists (AAP)

Physiatrists Annual Meeting

Embargo expired on 15-Feb-2018 at 08:00 ET


Putting the Brain to Work

Individuals with tetraplegia prioritize development of technology to restore lost upper limb strength and dexterity as a means to improve quality of life. This study aims to demonstrate a wearable functional electrical stimulation (FES) orthotic prov...

– Association of Academic Physiatrists (AAP)

Physiatrists Annual Meeting

Embargo expired on 15-Feb-2018 at 08:00 ET


Concussion Recovery in Children is Not One-Size-Fits-All

Concussion is common among children. Prior studies report differing variables associated with recovery time from concussion. The purpose of this study is to identify predictors associated with time to clearance for return to play (RTP) in younger ver...

– Association of Academic Physiatrists (AAP)

Physiatrists Annual Meeting

Embargo expired on 15-Feb-2018 at 08:00 ET


Simulated Horseback Riding Helpful in Treating Children with Cerebral Palsy

This study aims to develop a mechanical horseback riding simulator for the rehabilitation of children with neurological and musculoskeletal disabilities, focused on improving trunk control in this population.

– Association of Academic Physiatrists (AAP)

Physiatrists Annual Meeting

Embargo expired on 15-Feb-2018 at 08:00 ET


Pain Relief Now, More Pain Later?

In the setting of acute traumatic spinal cord injury (SCI), opioid administration is standard care for pain management. However, animal models of SCI have shown that opioid use in the early phase of SCI is deleterious to future quality of life (QOL),...

– Association of Academic Physiatrists (AAP)

Physiatrists Annual Meeting

Embargo expired on 15-Feb-2018 at 08:00 ET


Are Physicians Being Adequately Trained to Treat People with Disabilities?

Caring for patients with physical disabilities, particularly spinal cord injury (SCI), is not routinely part of the medical school curriculum. However, 17 percent of Americans are physically disabled, and there are nearly 17,000 new cases of SCI in A...

– Association of Academic Physiatrists (AAP)

Physiatrists Annual Meeting

Embargo expired on 15-Feb-2018 at 08:00 ET


Asthma Medication Linked to Infertility in Women

Women with asthma who only use short-acting asthma relievers take longer to become pregnant than other women, according to international research led by the University of Adelaide.

– University of Adelaide

European Respiratory Journal


University of Pennsylvania Researchers Conduct Comprehensive Evaluation of Patients with Concussion-Like Symptoms Following Reports of Audible Phenomena in Cuba

A comprehensive evaluation by clinical researchers at the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania identified a neurological syndrome that left U.S. government personnel serving in Havana, Cuba with persistent memory and thinking...

– Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania

JAMA


Rooming-in Program Launched at Intermountain Medical Center to Enhance Bonding Between Moms and Babies

Mothers and babies belong together — which is why Intermountain Medical Center in Salt Lake City has launched a rooming-in program to support early bonding between mothers and newborns.

– Intermountain Medical Center


Queen’s University Announces Novel Drug Delivery System with Potential to Reduce Rates of HIV

Queen’s University Belfast is playing a central role in an international consortium that has announced the development of a patch delivery system which will lower the chances of infection for those at very high risk of HIV.

– Queen's University Belfast

14-Feb-2018


Researchers Successfully Reverse Alzheimer’s Disease in Mouse Model

A team of researchers from the Cleveland Clinic Lerner Research Institute have found that gradually depleting an enzyme called BACE1 completely reverses the formation of amyloid plaques in the brains of mice with Alzheimer’s disease, thereby improv...

– The Rockefeller University Press

Journal of Experimental Medicine, March 5, 2018; NS074256; AG025493; AG046929; NM103942

Embargo expired on 14-Feb-2018 at 09:00 ET


Can Learning Stress-Reducing Techniques Help Reduce Seizures?

Learning techniques to help manage stress may help people with epilepsy reduce how often they have seizures, according to a study published in the February 14, 2018, online issue of Neurology®, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurolog...

– American Academy of Neurology (AAN)

Neurology

Embargo expired on 14-Feb-2018 at 16:00 ET


Alternative MRI Contrast Agent Performs Well in NIH Study

NIH-supported researchers at Massachusetts General Hospital are studying an alternative to current contrast agents used for magnetic resonance imaging. In a recent study, they showed that the experimental alternative, which is a manganese-based compo...

– National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering

OD010650; Radiology, Nov. 15, 2017; EB009062; EB022804; RR023385; HL128899; HL119145


Simulated Virtual Patients Improve Students’ Learning Experience

Medical students in India are using computer-simulated virtual patients (SVPs) as a learning tool for clinical skills and are becoming more enthusiastic about their studies. SVPs allow students to interact with and perform procedures on pretend patie...

– American Physiological Society (APS)

Advances in Physiology Education


Everyday Activities Associated with More Gray Matter in Brains of Older Adults

Higher levels of lifestyle physical activity – such as house cleaning, walking a dog and gardening, as well as exercise – are associated with more gray matter in the brains of older adults, according to a study by researchers at Rush University M...

– Rush University Medical Center

Journal of Gerontology: Psychological Sciences


Study Finds That a Surprise Stimulus Helps People Stop an Action

A new study from the University of Iowa finds that an unexpected sound causes people to stop an action more often than when they heard no sound at all. The finding could lead to new treatments for patients with motor-control disorders, such as Parkin...

– University of Iowa

Journal of Neuroscience


Race, Insurance Status Linked to Job Loss After Breast Cancer

Job loss following early-stage breast cancer diagnosis is associated with race and insurance status, but not with any clinical or treatment-related factors, finds a new study from the Brown School at Washington University in St. Louis.Not only were a...

– Washington University in St. Louis

Cancer Feb. 13, 2018


Living Human Tracheas

Biomedical engineers at Case Western Reserve University in Cleveland, Ohio, and Worcester Polytechnic Institute in Worcester, Mass. are growing tracheas by coaxing cells to form three distinct tissue types after assembling them into a tube structure-...

– Case Western Reserve University

Advanced Science


OCD Treatment Could Someday Start with a Brain Scan

UCLA researchers have developed a way to use brain scans and machine learning — a form of artificial intelligence — to predict whether people with OCD will benefit from cognitive behavior therapy. The technique could help improve the overall succ...

– University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA), Health Sciences

Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences


Cutting Off Cervical Cancer’s Fuel Supply Stymies Tumors

Researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis have shown that cervical tumors that don’t respond to radiation may be vulnerable to therapies that also attack the cancer’s fuel supply.

– Washington University in St. Louis

Cancer Research


Poor Fitness Linked to Weaker Brain Fiber, Higher Dementia Risk

Scientists have more evidence that exercise improves brain health and could be a lifesaving ingredient that prevents Alzheimer’s disease.

– UT Southwestern Medical Center

Journal of Alzheimer’s Disease


Orthodontic Surgery via Enzymatic Blade: No Incision Necessary

Researchers at the Technion have developed a method that could reduce the pain and cost associated with orthodontic work, while shortening the time needed to wear braces to about six months.

– American Technion Society

ACS Nano


Scientists Find Key Proteins Control Risk of Osteoarthritis During Aging

A study from scientists at The Scripps Research Institute (TSRI) explains why the risk of osteoarthritis increases as we age and offers a potential avenue for developing new therapies to maintain healthy joints.

– Scripps Research Institute

Science Translational Medicine, Feb. 14; AG007996; AR049617; AR505631


A New Class of Drug to Treat Herpes Simplex Virus Infection

For patients with the herpes simplex-1 virus (HSV-1), there are just a handful of drugs available to treat the painful condition that can affect the eyes, mouth and genitals.If patients develop resistance to these drugs, there are even fewer choices ...

– University of Illinois at Chicago

Science Translational Medicine


Special Supplement to American Journal of Public Health Focuses on High Risk Adolescent Pregnancy Prevention

A special supplement to the American Journal of Public Health explores updated perspectives and new research on high risk adolescent pregnancy prevention.

– American Public Health Association (APHA)


New Stem-Cell Based Stroke Treatment Repairs Damaged Brain Tissue

A team of researchers at the University of Georgia's Regenerative Bioscience Center and ArunA Biomedical, a UGA startup company, have developed a new treatment for stroke that reduces brain damage and accelerates the brain's natural healing tendencie...

– University of Georgia

Translational Stroke Research


Catching up to brain cancer

University of Delaware researchers have produced a new and freely available computer program that predicts cancer cell motion and spread with high accuracy. The system gives researchers a faster way of examining rapidly spreading brain cancer tumors ...

– University of Delaware

BMC Systems Biology

includes video


A Little Preparation Means Sending Your Allergic Camper Off with Confidence This Summer

5 tips from the American College of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology for parents who’d like to send their child with allergies or asthma to summer camp, and still keep them safe.

– American College of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology (ACAAI)


Cancer Researcher's Life Saved by CAR-T Treatment

Dr. Woodring Wright, a UT Southwestern Professor of Cell Biology who studies the end caps of chromosomal DNA, called telomeres, hoping to find ways to fight aging and cancer, had multiple myeloma.

– UT Southwestern Medical Center

includes video


CAR-T Clinical Trial Enrolling Multiple Myeloma Patients

UT Southwestern Medical Center is one of nine exclusive sites in the country enrolling multiple myeloma patients for a clinical trial of the CAR-T “living drug” therapy for cancer.

– UT Southwestern Medical Center


The Medical Minute: Proper Training Could Prevent Common Winter Sports Injuries

When you strap on skis or lace up skates, it’s important to remember that you have not trained like an Olympian, and that an ounce of prevention can help avoid the pain of injuries later.

– Penn State Health Milton S. Hershey Medical Center


There’s an App for That

UC Davis pathologist Hooman Rashidi is an expert in blood disorders but also a computer programmer. He has married the two disciplines and created must-have learning tools for medical students and residents. His latest is HemeQuiz1, a medical student...

– UC Davis Comprehensive Cancer Center

13-Feb-2018


Kidney Stones on the Rise, Mayo Clinic Study Finds

Kidney stones are a painful health condition, often requiring multiple procedures at great discomfort to the patient. Growing evidence suggests that the incidence of kidney stones is increasing steadily, especially in women. Using data from the Roche...

– Mayo Clinic

Mayo Clinic Proceedings

Embargo expired on 13-Feb-2018 at 00:05 ET

includes video


Analysis: Female Drivers Convicted for Driving Under the Influence of Alcohol

Women have become increasingly involved in drunk driving and fatal crashes. However, much of the research on drunk driving has been conducted using predominantly male samples. Little is known about the life context, psychiatric histories, and family ...

– Research Society on Alcoholism

Alcoholism: Clinical and Experimental Research

Embargo expired on 13-Feb-2018 at 10:00 ET


Study Maps Molecular Mechanisms Crucial for New Approach to Heart Disease Therapy

In this study, published in Cell Reports, two labs at UNC and a group at Princeton University reprogrammed ordinary cells called fibroblasts into new and healthy heart muscle cells, and recorded changes that appear to be necessary for this reprogramm...

– University of North Carolina Health Care System

Cell Reports

Embargo expired on 13-Feb-2018 at 12:00 ET


Aumentan Los Cálculos Renales, Descubre Estudio De Mayo Clinic

Los cálculos renales son dolorosos y generalmente requieren de varios procedimientos muy molestos para los pacientes. Cada vez hay más pruebas acerca de que la incidencia de los cálculos renales aumenta continuamente, sobre todo entre las mujeres....

– Mayo Clinic

Mayo Clinic Proceedings

Embargo expired on 13-Feb-2018 at 00:15 ET


Phase II Trial Demonstrates Activity of Durvalumab in Patients with Recurrent or Metastatic Head and Neck Cancer

Analysis of the phase II CONDOR trial indicates that the immune checkpoint inhibitor durvalumab is tolerable among heavily pre-treated patients with recurrent or metastatic head and neck cancer and has the potential to slow growth in tumors with low ...

– American Society for Radiation Oncology (ASTRO)

Multidisc Head and Neck Cancers Symposium, Feb-2018

Embargo expired on 13-Feb-2018 at 12:00 ET


Nivolumab Immunotherapy Safe and Feasible During Chemoradiation for Advanced Head and Neck Cancer

Analysis of a clinical trial, RTOG Foundation 3504, finds that nivolumab immunotherapy can be administered safely in conjunction with radiation therapy and chemotherapy for patients with newly diagnosed local-regionally advanced head and neck cancers...

– American Society for Radiation Oncology (ASTRO)

Multidisc Head and Neck Cancers Symposium, Feb-2018

Embargo expired on 13-Feb-2018 at 12:00 ET


Cabozantinib Shows Significant Activity in the First Line for Differentiated Thyroid Cancer

Results of a new phase II clinical trial indicate that cabozantinib offers an active therapy option for patients with differentiated thyroid cancer (DTC) that has progressed following surgery and treatment with radioactive iodine (RAI). Thirty-four o...

– American Society for Radiation Oncology (ASTRO)

Multidisc Head and Neck Cancers Symposium, Feb-2018

Embargo expired on 13-Feb-2018 at 00:05 ET


Lower-Dose Radiation Therapy Effective and Safe for HPV-Related Head and Neck Cancer After Induction Chemotherapy, Trial Finds

Results of the phase II OPTIMA clinical trial indicate that patients with head and neck cancers associated with the human papillomavirus (HPV), including those with advanced nodal disease, can receive substantially lower radiation doses safely and ef...

– American Society for Radiation Oncology (ASTRO)

Multidisc Head and Neck Cancers Symposium, Feb-2018

Embargo expired on 13-Feb-2018 at 12:00 ET


A Protein Could Make Stem Cell Therapy for Heart Attack Damage More Effective

Replenishing a naturally occurring heart protein could improve stem cell therapy after a heart attack

– Thomas Jefferson University

Circulation


Clues to Aging Found in Stem Cells' Genomes

Little hints of immortality are lurking in the stem cells of fruit flies

– University of Michigan

eLife


Most Children with Sickle Cell Anemia Not Receiving Key Medication to Stay Healthy

One of the greatest health threats to children with sickle cell anemia is getting a dangerous bacterial infection — but most are not receiving a key medication to reduce the risk, a new study suggests.

– Michigan Medicine - University of Michigan

Pediatrics


Mayo Clinic的研究发现,肾结石的患病率在上升

肾结石(Kidney stones)是十分痛苦的,而其治疗也往往需要多个令病人很不舒服的治疗程序。 越来越多的证据表明,肾结石的发病率在稳步上升,特别是在女性中。 使用罗切斯特流行病学项目(R...

– Mayo Clinic

Mayo Clinic Proceedings


Light-Activated Cancer Drugs Without Toxic Side Effects: Fresh Insight

Future cancer drugs that are activated by light and don’t cause the toxic side-effects of current chemotherapy treatments are closer to becoming a reality, thanks to new research made possible by the Monash Warwick Alliance, an intercontinental col...

– University of Warwick

Chemistry - A European Journal


Palm Oil in Your Valentine's Chocolate?

A diet high in saturated fat causes, in addition to obesity and metabolic changes associated with a prediabetic state, anxiodepressive and compulsive behaviors. All of these effects were shown to be tied to inflammation in the nucleus accumbens, reve...

– Centre hospitalier de l'Université de Montréal (CHUM)

Molecular Metabolism


NIH Funding Fewer Clinical Trials, Study Suggests

The number of clinical trials funded by the National Institutes of Health has declined since 2005, according to a new study by researchers at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. During the same period, average trial sizes were observ...

– Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health

Clinical Trials


Understanding a Fly’s Body Temperature May Help People Sleep Better

In findings that one day may help people sleep better, scientists have uncovered the first molecular evidence that two anciently conserved proteins in the brains of insects and mammals share a common biological ancestry as regulators of body temperat...

– Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center

Genes & Develpment, Feb-2018


Investigators Highlight Potential of Exercise in Addressing Substance Abuse in Teens

Exercise has numerous, well-documented health benefits. Could it also play a role in preventing and reducing substance misuse and abuse in adolescents? This is the intriguing question that a team of investigators from Case Western Reserve University ...

– Case Western Reserve University

Birth Defects Research; NIH


Scientists Create Most Sophisticated Human Liver Model Yet

Scientists have developed the most sophisticated mini-livers to date. These organoids can potentially help scientists better understand certain congenital liver diseases as well as speed up efforts to create liver tissue in the lab for transplantatio...

– Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center

Hepatolosy


Cabozantinib Shows Promise as First Line Treatment for Differentiated Thyroid Cancer

A kinase inhibitor called cabozantinib could be a viable therapy option for patients with metastatic, radioactive iodine-resistant thyroid cancer. In a trial initiated and led by the Abramson Cancer Center and the Perelman School of Medicine at the U...

– Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania

2018 Multidisciplinary Head and Neck Cancers Symposium


Scientists Identify Immune Cascade that Fuels Complications, Tissue Damage in Chlamydia Infections

Research in mice pinpoints immune mechanism behind tissue damage and complications of chlamydia infection, the most common sexually transmitted disease in the United States. Separate immune mechanisms drive bacterial clearance versus immune-mediat...

– Harvard Medical School

PNAS


What Is a ‘Normal’ Blood Pressure Response During Exercise Testing?

New data from the University of Illinois at Chicago suggest that the guidelines used to evaluate an individual’s peak blood pressure response during cardiopulmonary exercise testing, which were last updated in 1996 and help doctors screen for hyper...

– University of Illinois at Chicago

Hypertension


Brain Imaging Helps Redefine Intelligence

NYU Langone study offers the first solid evidence that functional MRI scans of brain entropy are a new means to understanding human intelligence.

– NYU Langone Health

PLOS ONE


A Synthetic Cell That Produces Anti-Cancer Drugs Within a Tumor

Researchers have successfully treated a cancerous tumor using a “nano-factory” – a synthetic cell that produces anti-cancer proteins within the tumor tissue. The synthetic cell could one day be an important part in the personalized medicine tre...

– American Technion Society

Advanced Healthcare Materials


Newly Discovered Gene May Protect Against Heart Disease

Scientists have identified a gene that may play a protective role in preventing heart disease. Their research revealed that the gene, called MeXis, acts within key cells inside clogged arteries to help remove excess cholesterol from blood vessels.

– University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA), Health Sciences

Nature Medicine, Feb-2018


Cuando el cuerpo ataca al cerebro: El sistema inmunitario generalmente es el culpable de la encefalitis, descubre estudio

La encefalitis causada por el ataque del sistema inmunitario al cerebro tiene una frecuencia similar a la de la encefalitis producto de infecciones, informan los investigadores de Mayo Clinic en los Anales de Neurología.

– Mayo Clinic

Anales de Neurología


Heroin Vaccine Blocks Lethal Overdose

Scientists at The Scripps Research Institute (TSRI) have achieved a major milestone toward designing a safe and effective vaccine to both treat heroin addiction and block lethal overdose of the drug.

– Scripps Research Institute

Molecular Pharmaceutics; UH3DA041146; F32AI126628; F32DA043323; R42DA040422; R44AI094770


Circulating Lipids Play Roles in Many Diseases

Cholesterol in muscular dystrophy; synergy between alcohol and hepatitis in cholesterol levels; bacterial lipids in healthy arteries.

– American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology (ASBMB)

Journal of Lipid Research; Journal of Lipid Research; Journal of Lipid Research


Complimentary Press Registration Available for 2018 State-of-the-Art Clinical Symposium

The American College of Rheumatology (ACR) welcomes members of the press to write about rheumatology research presented the State-of-the-Art Clinical Symposium (SOTA) in Chicago, IL, on April 13-15.

– American College of Rheumatology (ACR)

SOTA 2018


Tips for Men: How to Shave

There is no shortage of men’s razors and other shaving tools on the market, but do any of them offer the perfect shave? According to dermatologists from the American Academy of Dermatology, it’s less about which tools you use, and more about your...

– American Academy of Dermatology

includes video


For Older Adults, Four-Pronged Approach Can Contribute to Healthy Aging

Jo Cleveland, M.D., professor of gerontology and geriatric medicine at Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center, knows from experience that making lifestyle changes can be difficult for older adults. But she says there are four areas in which seniors can t...

Expert Available

– Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center

12-Feb-2018


Words Do Matter: A Reminder to Practice Empathy

...

– Diseases of the Colon and Rectum Journal

Diseases of the Colon & Rectum

Embargo expired on 12-Feb-2018 at 10:00 ET


Is Your Child in Excellent or Very Good Health? If Not, Read On...

According to 2015 National Health Interview Survey data published by the Center for Disease Control and Prevention, it is estimated that about 85% of children under the age of 18 are in excellent or very good health. What happens to the rest? Many ar...

– Diseases of the Colon and Rectum Journal

Diseases of the Colon & Rectum

Embargo expired on 12-Feb-2018 at 10:00 ET

includes video


Managing Postoperative Pain in the Cancer Patient

In the March issue of Diseases of the Colon & Rectum, surgeons from Australia discuss postoperative pain control pain control following one of the most extensive operations performed for pelvic cancer. In an era where many studies have shown that pa...

– Diseases of the Colon and Rectum Journal

Diseases of the Colon & Rectal

Embargo expired on 12-Feb-2018 at 10:00 ET

includes video


Study Suggests Way to Attack Deadly, Untreatable Nerve Tumors

Genomic profiling of mostly untreatable and deadly nerve sheath tumors led scientists to test a possible therapeutic strategy that inhibited tumor growth in lab tests on human tumor cells and mouse models, according to research in the journal Cancer ...

– Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center

Cancer Cell, Feb-2018

Embargo expired on 12-Feb-2018 at 12:00 ET


Family History Increases Breast Cancer Risk Even in Older Women: Weighing Screening Options

Family history of breast cancer continues to significantly increase chances of developing invasive breast tumors in aging women — those ages 65 and older, according to research published in JAMA Internal Medicine. The findings could impact mammogra...

– Georgetown Lombardi Comprehensive Cancer Center

JAMA Internal Medicine

Embargo expired on 12-Feb-2018 at 11:00 ET


Naltrexone Treatment Is More Effective for Heavy Drinkers Who Use Nicotine/Cigarettes

There are medications available to help people who drink excessive amounts of alcohol reduce or stop their drinking. One such medication is the opioid antagonist naltrexone, which has been approved for treatment of alcohol dependence by the Food and ...

– Research Society on Alcoholism

Alcoholism: Clinical and Experimental Research

Embargo expired on 12-Feb-2018 at 10:00 ET


Which Patients with Diverticulitis Require Surgery?

In the March issue of Diseases of the Colon & Rectum, surgeons from Birmingham, England, studied 5 years of National Health Service data of patients admitted for acute diverticulitis in an effort to identify factors associated with the need for elect...

– Diseases of the Colon and Rectum Journal

Diseases of the Colon and Rectum

Embargo expired on 12-Feb-2018 at 10:00 ET


Experimental Therapy Restores Nerve Insulation Damaged by Disease

When the body attacks its own healthy tissues in an autoimmune disease, peripheral nerve damage handicaps people and causes persistent neuropathic pain when insulation on healing nerves doesn’t fully regenerate. Unfortunately, there are no effectiv...

– Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center

Nature Medicine, Feb-2018

Embargo expired on 12-Feb-2018 at 11:00 ET


Which Commonly Prescribed Drug is More Effective for Infants with Epilepsy?

Comparison of two of the most commonly prescribed drugs for infants with nonsyndromic epilepsy revealed that levetiracetam was more effective than phenobarbital, according a multicenter, observational study published in JAMA Pediatrics. After six mon...

– Ann & Robert H. Lurie Children's Hospital of Chicago

JAMA Pediatrics, Feb-2018

Embargo expired on 12-Feb-2018 at 11:00 ET


Opioid Use Increases Risk of Serious Infections

Opioid users have a significantly increased risk of infections severe enough to require treatment at the hospital, such as pneumonia and meningitis, as compared to people who don’t use opioids.

– Vanderbilt University Medical Center

Annals of Internal Medicine

Embargo expired on 12-Feb-2018 at 17:00 ET


Bed Bug Histamines Are Substantial, Persistent in Infested Homes

Nuisance pest into medically important threat? A North Carolina State University study shows that histamine levels are substantially higher in homes infested by bed bugs than in pest-free homes, and that these histamine levels persist for months – ...

– North Carolina State University

PLOS One

Embargo expired on 12-Feb-2018 at 14:00 ET


Mount Sinai Researchers Identify New Intracellular Pathway to Promote Pain Relief Without Increasing the Risk of Addiction

Study results may provide mechanism to make opioids safer and more efficient

– Mount Sinai Health System

Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Embargo expired on 12-Feb-2018 at 15:00 ET


Medicaid Expansion in Kentucky Improves Breast Cancer Care for Women 20 to 64 Years Old

Kentucky researchers report rates of diagnosis of early stage disease and utilization of less invasive operations have increased since 2014.

– American College of Surgeons (ACS)

Journal of the American College of Surgeons

Embargo expired on 12-Feb-2018 at 11:00 ET


Newly Identified Potential Therapeutic Approach Kills Triple-Negative Breast Cancer Cells in Pre-Clinical Study

Triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC), a highly aggressive, relapse-prone cancer that accounts for one-fourth of all breast cancers, could be the focus of a new area of study for immune checkpoint blockade therapy. A team of researchers at The Univer...

– University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center

Cancer Cell

Embargo expired on 12-Feb-2018 at 12:00 ET


Opioid Use Increases Risk Of Serious Infections

Opioid users have a significantly increased risk of infections severe enough to require treatment at the hospital, such as pneumonia and meningitis, as compared to people who don’t use opioids.

– Vanderbilt University Medical Center

Annals of Internal Medicine

Embargo expired on 12-Feb-2018 at 17:00 ET


Obesity Associated with Longer Survival for Men with Metastatic Melanoma

Obese patients with metastatic melanoma who are treated with targeted or immune therapies live significantly longer than those with a normal body mass index (BMI), investigators report in a study published in Lancet Oncology of 1,918 patients in six ...

– University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center

Lancet Oncology

Embargo expired on 12-Feb-2018 at 18:30 ET


Johns Hopkins Brings Therapy Dogs into ICU

In an editorial that draws on results of previously published studies and experiences in their medical intensive care unit (ICU), a team of Johns Hopkins Medicine professionals say that bringing specially trained dogs into ICUs can safely and substan...

– Johns Hopkins Medicine

Critical Care

Embargo expired on 12-Feb-2018 at 20:00 ET


Smart Bomb Virus Shows Promise as Brain Tumor Immunotherapy

A common cold virus engineered to attack the most common and deadly of brain tumors allowed 20 percent of patients with recurrent glioblastoma to live for three years or longer, researchers from The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center repor...

– University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center

Journal of Clinical Oncology

Embargo expired on 12-Feb-2018 at 16:00 ET


Huntington's Disease Provides New Cancer Weapon

Patients with Huntington’s disease, a fatal genetic illness that causes the breakdown of nerve cells in the brain, have up to 80 percent less cancer than the general population.Northwestern Medicine scientists have discovered why Huntington’s is ...

– Northwestern University

EMBO Reports; R35CA197450


Researchers Inhibit Cancer Metastases via Novel Steps

In one of the first successes of its kind, researchers have inhibited the spreading of cancer cells from one part of the body to another. In doing so, they relied on a new model of how cancer metastasizes that emphasizes epigenetics, which examines h...

– Case Western Reserve University

Nature Medicine; Case Comprehensive Cancer Center; Liddy Shriver Sarcoma Initiative; QuadW Foundation; Sarcoma Foundation of America; NIH


IU-Led Study Finds Neurotransmitter Glutamate May Play a Role in Alcohol Relapse, Addiction

Indiana University researchers scanned the brains of individuals with alcohol abuse disorder to find the neurotransmitter glutamate may play a role in some addition cravings.

– Indiana University

Journal of Alcohol and Alcoholism; R01AA13650


Progress, but Far From Perfection, on Avoiding Risky Sedatives in Older Adults

They help many people sleep, or feel calmer or less anxious. But in older people, they also double the risk of car crashes, falls and broken hips. That’s why guidelines say very few people over 65 should take medicines known as benzodiazepines. Yet...

– Michigan Medicine - University of Michigan

Journal of the American Geriatrics Society, Early View, Feb. 12, 2018 DOI: 10.1111/jgs.15292


Neutron Study of Glaucoma Drugs Offers Clues About Enzyme Targets for Aggressive Cancers

A team of researchers from ORNL’s Energy and Transportation Science Division is using neutron imaging to study particulate filters that collect harmful emissions in vehicles. A better understanding of how heat treatments and oxidation methods can ...

– Oak Ridge National Laboratory

Structure


'Intellicane' Could One Day Help Flag Gait Problems, Falling Risks More Quickly

Falling is no joke when you're a senior citizen or have balance issues. Vanderbilt engineers are working on a 'smart cane' that could help physical therapists spot and treat problems sooner.

– Vanderbilt University

includes video


Obesity, Other Risks Play Large Role in Sudden Cardiac Arrest Among the Young

Obesity and other common cardiovascular risk factors may play a greater role in sudden cardiac arrest among younger people than previously recognized, underscoring the importance of earlier screening, a Cedars-Sinai study has found.

– Cedars-Sinai

Circulation


Frequent Night Shift Work Boosts Likelihood of Type 2 Diabetes, Study Shows

A new study of 272,000 people found that the more frequently people work the night shift, the greater their likelihood of having diabetes.

– University of Colorado Boulder

Diabetes Care, Feb-2018


Building And Breaking Connections: How Neuronal Networks Influence Alcoholism

Although it has been known that alterations in the connections between neurons in the brain likely play a role in alcohol dependence and other addictions, the cause-and-effect between these brain alterations and behavior has been less clear.

– Texas A&M University

Nature Neuroscience, Feb-2018; National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism ; National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism ; National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases ...


Rutgers School of Public Health Names 2018 Convocation Speaker: Dr. Abdul El-Sayed

Rutgers School of Public Health names Dr. Abdul El-Sayed as their 2018 Convocation Speaker and Senator Frank R. Lautenberg Award recipient.

– Rutgers School of Public Health


Only Half of Americans Say They Know CPR, Far Less Know Proper “Hands Only” Technique

When it comes to heart health emergencies, many Americans don’t have the knowledge to aid others, and often don’t know the proper way to help themselves, according to a new Cleveland Clinic survey. The survey found that slightly more than half...

– Cleveland Clinic


When the Body Attacks the Brain: Immune System Often to Blame for Encephalitis, Study Finds

ROCHESTER, Minn. — Encephalitis caused by the immune system attacking the brain is similar in frequency to encephalitis from infections, Mayo Clinic researchers report in Annals of Neurology.

– Mayo Clinic

Annals of Neurology


Providing Culturally Competent Care for African Americans Reduces Health Disparities

If healthcare providers take the time to familiarize themselves with the cultural aspects of African Americans, other minority populations, which includes religious beliefs, sexual preferences, etc., health disparities within these patients groups ca...

– American Association of Nurse Anesthetists (AANA)


Giving New Meaning to Patient Care: Doctors to Go Skiing with Patients who have Cerebral Palsy and Other Conditions

Hospital for Special Surgery is sponsoring a ski trip for patients with cerebral palsy and other disabilities, and their orthopedic surgeons will be skiing alongside them at Windham Mountain in upstate New York on February 15.

– Hospital for Special Surgery


Pivotal Study of Focused Ultrasound to Treat Parkinson's Disease

The University of Maryland Medical Center (UMMC) and the University of Maryland School of Medicine (UMSOM)) are leading a phase 3 study to test the safety and efficacy of using MRI-guided focused ultrasound on the brain in order to treat Parkinson’...

– University of Maryland Medical Center/School of Medicine

MedWire Policy and Public Affairs


AANA Responds to President Trump’s Proposed FY2019 Budget

In response to the release of President Donald Trump’s proposed Fiscal Year 2019 budget, the American Association of Nurse Anesthetists (AANA) has grave concerns about its potential far-reaching impact on the nation’s nursing workforce.

– American Association of Nurse Anesthetists (AANA)


House Introduces Bill to Expand Chiropractic Access to Military Retirees, Families

A bill introduced last week in the House of Representatives and supported by the American Chiropractic Association (ACA) would expand access to chiropractic services to military retirees, dependents and survivors through the Department of Defense TRI...

– American Chiropractic Association


American Academy of Home Care Medicine Applauds Extension of Independence at Home (IAH) Demonstration

The American Academy of Home Care Medicine (AAHCM) applauds Congressional leaders for including a two-year extension of the successful Independence at Home (IAH) demonstration in the Bipartisan Budget Act of 2018, signed by the President.

– American Academy of Home Care Medicine


Statement from the American Pain Society: McCaskill Report on Pharma Company Financial Support for Pain Organizations

McCaskill Report on Pharma Company Financial Support for Pain Organizations

– American Pain Society

MedWire Announcements


Leading Cancer Organizations Provide Guidance on Understanding and Managing Immunotherapy Side Effects

New guidelines developed collaboratively by the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) and the National Comprehensive Cancer Network® (NCCN®) offer clinicians much needed recommendations for assessment and management of side effects related t...

– National Comprehensive Cancer Network® (NCCN®)

Embargo expired on 14-Feb-2018 at 10:00 ET

includes video


Best of Meeting Abstracts Announced for Historic World Congress on Regional Anesthesia and Pain Medicine

Hip fracture, general vs regional, spine surgery among the topics of Best of Meeting Abstracts selected for special presentation at ASRA's 2018 World Congress on Regional Anesthesia and Pain Medicine

– American Society of Regional Anesthesia and Pain Medicine (ASRA)


FAU Approved for First Fellowship in Cardiology

Just in time for Valentine’s Day and American Heart Month, FAU's College of Medicine has received initial accreditation from the national Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education for its first University-sponsored fellowship. The FAU Ca...

– Florida Atlantic University


Tufts Names New Director of the Jean Mayer USDA Human Nutrition Research Center on Aging

Tufts University today named Sarah Booth, Ph.D., the new director of the Jean Mayer USDA Human Nutrition Center for Research on Aging (HNRCA) at Tufts.

– Tufts University


Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics Celebrates the Experts: Registered Dietitian Nutritionist Day is March 14

March is National Nutrition Month®, when the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics reminds everyone to return to the basics of healthful eating. March is also when the Academy celebrates Registered Dietitian Nutritionist Day, honoring the contributions...

– Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics


U.S. News & World Report Recognizes Six Hackensack Meridian Health Nursing and Rehabilitation Facilities with Top Rating

Hackensack Meridian Health's Nursing and Rehabilitation Facilities are highly ranked and an integral part of the network's continuum of high quality patient-centered care.

– Hackensack Meridian Health


Researchers in the GW Department of Dermatology to Lecture and Present Posters at the 2018 American Academy of Dermatology Annual Meeting

Clinicians and researchers from the Department of Dermatology at the GW School of Medicine and Health Sciences will present poster at the American Academy of Dermatology Annual Meeting starting Feb. 16.

– George Washington University

2018 American Academy of Dermatology Annual Meeting, Feb. 16–20


American College of Rheumatology Awarded Grant to Focus on Projects That Curb Health Disparities

The American College of Rheumatology was awarded a grant from the American Society of Association Executives to develop a new program, Uniting Collaborators for Innovation (UCOIN), that focuses on creating member-led initiatives that diminish racial ...

– American College of Rheumatology (ACR)


Harbor Freight Tools Owner and His Foundation Give $50M to Create Smidt Heart Institute

Cedars-Sinai announced today a $50 million gift from Eric and Susan Smidt and The Smidt Foundation to create the Smidt Heart Institute. The gift will advance vital research and innovative practices across the fields of cardiology and cardiovascular s...

– Cedars-Sinai


Seattle Children’s Receives $60 Million Legacy Gift

Seattle Children’s today announced it has received the second largest single charitable gift in its 111-year history as the residual beneficiary of the estate of Bruce Leven. The landmark bequest is expected to exceed $60 million.

– Seattle Children's Hospital


ISPOR Announces a Brand Refresh for the Society

ISPOR, the professional society for health economics and outcomes research, announced today the launch of its new branding.

– ISPOR—The Professional Society for Health Economics and Outcomes Research

includes video


On-Screen, On-Demand, On-Time: The Future of Telemedicine at Penn Medicine

Penn Medicine Announces its new Center for Connected Care to centralize the health system’s telemedicine activities.

– Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania


Ocean Medical Center Receives Accreditation for Residency Programs in Family Medicine and Psychiatry

Ocean Medical Center received accreditation from the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) for residency training programs in family medicine and psychiatry, practice areas in which there are serious shortages of physicians exp...

– Hackensack Meridian Health


Hackensack University Medical Center Orthopedic Surgeon Performs Groundbreaking Robotic-Assisted Total Knee Replacement Surgery

Hackensack University Medical Center is one of four centers in the country participating in a clinical trial to evaluate whether the TSolution One System is a safe and effective alternative to traditional knee replacement using manual surgical inst...

– Hackensack Meridian Health


Childhood Cancer Survivors, Hospital Host Fundraiser for Research

The Children’s Hospital University of Illinois will host an annual head-shaving event to raise money for the St. Baldrick’s Foundation.

– University of Illinois at Chicago


Wildlife Conservationists Encouraged by Cambodia’s Pursuit of Justice in Murder Case of Three Rangers And Committed to the Protection of Keo Seima Wildlife Sanctuary

The Wildlife Conservation Society is encouraged by the Cambodian Government’s actions pursuing justice in connection to the murder two weeks ago of three rangers, including one WCS staff member, and is committed to continue working with the authori...

– Wildlife Conservation Society


ATS Foundation/ResMed Research Fellowship Awardee Named

Jeremy Orr, MD, of University of California, San Diego, has been awarded the new ATS Foundation/ResMed Research Fellowship in Noninvasive Ventilation (NIV) in COPD.

– American Thoracic Society (ATS)


Integrated Care of Patients with Atrial Fibrillation Symposium, Hosted by UNC School of Medicine

The UNC School of Medicine will host a continuing professional education (CPE) symposium on March 10, 2018 in Chapel Hill to educate medical professionals on the streamlining of care for patients with Atrial fibrillation or Afib.

– University of North Carolina Health Care System

Atrial Fibrillation Symposium, March 10, 2018


Heart Surgery Program Earns Top Quality Rating

MedStar Heart & Vascular Institute’s cardiac surgery program at MedStar Washington Hospital Center has earned the highest quality rating of three stars from the prestigious Society of Thoracic Surgeons (STS), placing it once again among the top sur...

– MedStar Heart & Vascular Institute and the Cleveland Clinic Heart and Vascular Institute


University Hospitals Named One of the World's Most Ethical Companies in 2018 by Ethisphere Institute

University Hospitals in Cleveland has been recognized as one of the most ethical companies for 2018 by the Ethisphere Institute.

– University Hospitals Cleveland Medical Center


Rutgers Cancer Institute of New Jersey at University Hospital Expands Oncology Leadership

New oncology leaders for Rutgers Cancer Institute of New Jersey at University Hospital in Newark have been named, further enhancing the facility’s expertise and ability to deliver National Cancer Institute (NCI)-designated Comprehensive Cancer Cent...

– Rutgers Cancer Institute of New Jersey

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