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Newswise Special Wire
Tuesday, April 21, 2015

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Newswise Cancer Research Wire for 21-Apr-2015
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Cancer Research Wire

Cancer research news for the public and news media. More stories can be found at the Newswise Cancer News Source.

Re-Engineering Lupus Into a Cancer Killer

Researchers from the Yale Cancer Center and the Veterans Affairs Greater Los Angeles Healthcare System have devised a way to re-engineer lupus antibodies to turn them into potential cancer killers. Findings from recent research were presented April 21 at the American Association for Cancer Research Annual Meeting 2015 Philadelphia.

(Embargo expired on 21-Apr-2015 at 13:00 ET)

American Association for Cancer Research Annual Meeting

– Yale Cancer Center

Most Cancer Patients Want Tumor Profiling, Even if It Reveals Other Genetic Risks

Most cancer patients would opt for tumor profiling even if the test revealed that they or their families were at risk for other genetic diseases, according to a Yale Cancer Center study. The findings were presented April 21 at the American Association for Cancer Research Annual Meeting 2015 in Philadelphia.

(Embargo expired on 21-Apr-2015 at 13:00 ET)

American Association for Cancer Research Annual Meeting

– Yale Cancer Center

Breast Cancer Website Launched to Provide Info on Dense Breasts

Recognizing that both women and their doctors are often confused after a mammogram reveals the woman has dense breasts, a nonprofit organization has launched a major new educational website.

 • Image(s) embedded •  (Embargo expired on 21-Apr-2015 at 08:00 ET)

– DenseBreast-info.org

Technology Could Let Women Skip Annual Mammograms

Technology developing at The University of Texas at El Paso (UTEP) is on track to predict if and when breast cancer will appear.

 • Image(s) embedded • 

Computerized Medical Imaging and Graphics journal, July 2014

– University of Texas at El Paso

Trending Stories Report for 21 April 2015

Trending news releases with the most views in a single day. Topics include: wildlife conservation, diet supplements and cancer, mammograms, breast cancer, nutrition, immunology, pancreatic cancer, Earth Day, cold v. allergies, and environment.

– Newswise Trends

Childhood Cancer Survivors More Likely to Claim Social Security Support as Adults

Study shows they're five times more likely to have enrolled in a Social Security disability assistance program.

 • Image(s) embedded • 

– University of Utah Health Sciences

Two New Studies on Honokiol Extract Show Promise for Kidney and Bladder Cancers

The botanical extract honokiol, a biologically active molecule isolated from the bark of Magnolia spp., holds promise as an adjunct treatment for aggressive bladder and kidney cancers, as reported in two new studies. New research on honokiol in bladder cancer was presented at the American Association for Cancer Research (AACR) Annual Meeting 2015. Research on honokiol’s effect on renal cancer metastasis was published in the April 2015 issue of the International Journal of Oncology.

International Journal of Oncology; American Association for Cancer Research (AACR) Annual Meeting 2015

– Better Health Publishing

Dietary Supplements Shown to Increase Cancer Risk

While dietary supplements may be advertised to promote health, a forum at the American Association for Cancer Research (AACR) Annual Meeting 2015 by University of Colorado Cancer Center investigator Tim Byers, MD, MPH, describes research showing that over-the-counter supplements may actually increase cancer risk if taken in excess of the recommended dietary amount.

 • Image(s) embedded •  (Embargo expired on 20-Apr-2015 at 17:00 ET)

American Association for Cancer Research (AACR) Annual Meeting 2015

– University of Colorado Cancer Center

Tumor Genome Sequencing Shows the Most Frequently Altered Gene in Bladder Cancer: TERT

At AACR, joint study by NCI and University of Colorado Cancer Center shows TERT is most commonly mutated gene in bladder cancer.

 • Image(s) embedded •  (Embargo expired on 20-Apr-2015 at 08:00 ET)

American Association for Cancer Research (AACR) Annual Meeting 2015

– University of Colorado Cancer Center

Overnight Fasting May Reduce Breast Cancer Risk in Women

A decrease in the amount of time spent eating and an increase in overnight fasting reduces glucose levels and may reduce the risk of breast cancer among women, report University of California, San Diego School of Medicine researchers in the journal Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention.

(Embargo expired on 20-Apr-2015 at 08:00 ET)

Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention

– University of California, San Diego Health Sciences

Oral Milk Thistle Extract Stops Colorectal Cancer Stem Cells From Growing Tumors

"It's very simple: tumors from mice that were initially fed silibinin had fewer cancer stem cells, were smaller, had lower metabolisms and showed decreased growth of new blood vessels," says University of Colorado Cancer Center researcher.

 • Image(s) embedded •  (Embargo expired on 20-Apr-2015 at 13:00 ET)

American Association for Cancer Research (AACR) Annual Meeting 2015

– University of Colorado Cancer Center

New Drug Combination Shows Promise for Breaking Breast Cancer Resistance

Researchers from The University of Manchester working with drug development company Evgen Pharma, have developed a new combination of drugs which could overcome treatment resistance and relapse in breast cancer.

 • Image(s) embedded •  (Embargo expired on 20-Apr-2015 at 13:00 ET)

American Association of Cancer Research annual conference on Monday, 20 April

– University of Manchester

Imaging Immunity

A novel approach that allows real-time imaging of the immune system’s response to the presence of tumors—without the need for blood draws or invasive biopsies—offers a potential breakthrough both in diagnostics and in the ability to monitor efficacy of cancer therapies.

(Embargo expired on 20-Apr-2015 at 15:00 ET)

PNAS, Apr-2015; RO1 AI087879-01; DP1-GM106409-03; R01-GM100518-04

– Whitehead Institute for Biomedical Research

Pancreatic Cancer Breakthrough: Scientists Turn Cancer Cells into Normal Cells

Scientists find a novel avenue for therapeutic intervention of the “silent cancer.”

 • Image(s) embedded •  (Embargo expired on 20-Apr-2015 at 12:00 ET)

– Sanford-Burnham Medical Research Institute

USPSTF Mammography Recommendations Would Cost Thousands of Lives and May Strip Millions of Mammography Insurance Coverage

Adoption of draft US Preventive Services Task Force breast cancer screening recommendations would result in thousands of unnecessary deaths each year and may strip millions of women of insurance coverage for mammograms at the time of their choosing previously guaranteed by the Affordable Care Act .

(Embargo expired on 20-Apr-2015 at 17:00 ET)

– American College of Radiology (ACR)

Experimental Immune Therapy Tested in Preliminary Study of Women with Triple-Negative Breast Cancer

Early data in a preliminary human study show that an experimental immune system drug is generally safe and well tolerated in women with metastatic, triple-negative breast cancer, a persistently difficult form of the disease to treat.

(Embargo expired on 20-Apr-2015 at 08:30 ET)

American Association for Cancer Research's 2015 annual meeting

– Johns Hopkins Medicine

Immunotherapy Combination Promising for Untreated Patients with Advanced Melanoma

A Phase 2 clinical trial led by Ludwig Harvard’s Stephen Hodi and Ludwig Memorial Sloan Kettering (MSK)’s Jedd Wolchok has found that the combination of two immunotherapies for first-line treatment of advanced melanoma induces better responses and far longer progression-free survival than giving one of those drugs alone. Further, the combination was effective in the portion of melanoma patients—the majority—who currently have few effective treatment options. The results of the trial, which compared a combination of checkpoint inhibitors ipilimumab and nivolumab against ipilimumab alone in previously untreated patients, were presented today at the 2015 Annual Meeting of the American Association for Cancer Research and have been simultaneously published in the New England Journal of Medicine.

(Embargo expired on 20-Apr-2015 at 08:30 ET)

The New England Journal of Medicine; AACR Annual Meeting 2015

– Ludwig Cancer Research

Long Non-Coding RNA Modulates Colorectal Cancer Metabolism

Long non-coding RNAs (lncRNA) are unusual in that they don’t encode proteins like normal RNA. Yet they do play a role in regulating cellular functions and interest cancer researchers.

 • Image(s) embedded •  (Embargo expired on 20-Apr-2015 at 15:35 ET)

– University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center

MD Anderson Study Seeks Earlier Ovarian Cancer Detection

Successful ovarian cancer treatment often relies on catching it early. A study at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center may help point to a new method for women at risk.

 • Image(s) embedded •  (Embargo expired on 20-Apr-2015 at 16:05 ET)

AACR meeting

– University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center

MD Anderson Study Points to Potential New Lung Cancer Therapy

New findings about regulation of PD-L1, a protein that allows cancer to evade the immune system, has shown therapeutic promise for several cancers, including the most common form of lung cancer.

 • Image(s) embedded •  (Embargo expired on 20-Apr-2015 at 16:35 ET)

AACR meeting

– University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center

Happily Ever After: Scientists Arrange Protein-Nanoparticle Marriage

University at Buffalo researchers have discovered a way to easily and effectively fasten proteins to nanoparticles – essentially an arranged marriage – by simply mixing them together. The biotechnology, described April 20 online in the journal Nature Chemistry, is in its infancy. But it already has shown promise for developing an HIV vaccine and as a way to target cancer cells.

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Nature Chemistry

– University at Buffalo

Breast Tumor Stiffness and Metastasis Risk Linked by Molecule’s Movement

Researchers at the University of California, San Diego School of Medicine and Moores Cancer Center have discovered a molecular mechanism that connects breast tissue stiffness to tumor metastasis and poor prognosis. The study may inspire new approaches to predicting patient outcomes and halting tumor metastasis.

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Nature Cell Biology

– University of California, San Diego Health Sciences

Frequent Indoor Tanning among New Jersey Teens Shows Correlation with Smoking and Social Media Use

Research from Rutgers Cancer Institute of New Jersey and Rutgers School of Public Health shows more than a third of New Jersey high school students who engage in indoor tanning do so frequently and many would find it hard to stop the practice. Investigators also found that frequent indoor tanners were more likely to smoke and to engage in social media activities related to indoor tanning.

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Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology

– Rutgers Cancer Institute of New Jersey

UNM Cancer Center Opens International Clinical Trial for Personalized Kidney Cancer Vaccine

The University of New Mexico Cancer Center enrolled its first patient in a phase 3 clinical trial that uses a person’s own kidney cancer cells to make a vaccine tailored to kill those cells.

– University of New Mexico Cancer Center

Clinical Trial Offers Patient ‘Best Shot’ at Fighting Kidney Cancer

The pain Anne Holmes felt in her arm was actually kidney cancer that had spread. She joined a phase 3 clinical trial that recently opened at the UNM Cancer Center. The trial tests a new approach that strips the invisibility cloak from spreading kidney cancer cells; it will use Holmes' own cells to create a vaccine tailored for her cancer cells.

– University of New Mexico Cancer Center

How Statistics Can Capture the Unique Fingerprint of Cancer

KU Cancer Center researcher is using genomic, transcriptomic and epigenomic data to determine cancer molecular subtypes.

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NIH R21 CA 140879; NIH R21 GM 86689; NIH R21 CA182715

– University of Kansas Cancer Center

St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital Hosts “Under the Sea” Formal for Teen Patients

Patients, siblings and their guests recently enjoyed an unforgettable evening of glitz and glamour during the Teen Formal at St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital.

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– St. Jude Children's Research Hospital

Shared Risk Factors Lead to Diabetes, Heart Disease and Cancer, Says Major AACR Symposium

In a major symposium at the American Association for Cancer Research (AACR) Annual Meeting 2015, University of Colorado Cancer Center investigator Tim Byers, MD, MPH, examines research demonstrating the link between cancer, diabetes and cardiovascular disease.

 • Image(s) embedded •  (Embargo expired on 19-Apr-2015 at 13:00 ET)

American Association for Cancer Research (AACR) Annual Meeting 2015

– University of Colorado Cancer Center

Driver of Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer, FGFR1, Also Present in 23 Percent of Small Cell Lung Cancer

Results presented at AACR 2015 show oncogene recognized in NSCLC in small cell lung cancer, as well, implying that medicines in development for the first may be applicable to second.

 • Image(s) embedded •  (Embargo expired on 19-Apr-2015 at 13:00 ET)

American Association for Cancer Research (AACR) Annual Meeting 2015

– University of Colorado Cancer Center

Gene Signatures Predict Doxorubicin Response in K9 Osteosarcoma

New work by the University of Colorado Cancer Center presented at AACR 2015 demonstrates a gene expression model that predicts canine osteosarcoma response to doxorubicin, potentially allowing veterinary oncologists to better choose which drug to use with their patients.

 • Image(s) embedded •  (Embargo expired on 19-Apr-2015 at 13:00 ET)

American Association for Cancer Research (AACR) Annual Meeting 2015

– University of Colorado Cancer Center

New Combination of Immunotherapy Drugs is Safe, Shrinks Tumors in Metastatic Melanoma Patients

Once again, researchers at Penn’s Abramson Cancer Center have extended the reach of the immune system in the fight against metastatic melanoma, this time by combining the checkpoint inhibitor tremelimumab with an anti-CD40 monoclonal antibody drug.

(Embargo expired on 19-Apr-2015 at 15:15 ET)

AACR Annual Meeting 2015

– Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania

Immunotherapy Drug Pembrolizumab Shows Early Promise for Mesothelioma Patients

The PD-1 inhibitor pembrolizumab, a cancer immunotherapy drug, shrank or halted growth of tumors in 76 percent of patients with pleural mesothelioma, a rare and deadly form of cancer that arises in the outer lining of the lungs and internal chest wall, according to a new study from researchers in the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania. Patients diagnosed with the disease, which is tied to exposure to asbestos, have a median survival rate of about one year.

 • Image(s) embedded •  (Embargo expired on 19-Apr-2015 at 12:45 ET)

American Association of Cancer Research Annual Meeting

– Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania

New Subsets of Lung Cancer with KRAS Gene Mutations Identified

Mutations of the KRAS gene are commonly known to lead to cancer. However, deeper understanding of exactly how they do this continues to be explored by cancer researchers.

 • Image(s) embedded •  (Embargo expired on 19-Apr-2015 at 15:20 ET)

2015 American Association for Cancer Research (AACR) Annual Meeting

– University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center

Investigational Personalized Cellular Therapy Tolerated Well by Patients with Advanced Mesothelioma, Ovarian and Pancreatic Cancers

Genetically modified versions of patients’ own immune cells successfully traveled to tumors they were designed to attack in an early-stage trial for mesothelioma and pancreatic and ovarian cancers at the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania. The data adds to a growing body of research showing the promise of CAR T cell technology. The interim results will be presented at the American Association for Cancer Research (AACR) Annual Meeting 2015, April 18-22.

(Embargo expired on 19-Apr-2015 at 12:45 ET)

AACR meeting

– Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania

A New Lease on Life for Prostate Tissue

What if a prostate cancer patient could learn which anti-cancer treatments would work best for him without having to swallow a single pill or endure a single intravenous line or injection? Research from Rutgers Cancer Institute of New Jersey involving the development of human organoid prostate models could have implications for how future therapy is guided for some of this population.

 • Image(s) embedded •  (Embargo expired on 19-Apr-2015 at 13:00 ET)

AACR Annual Meeting 2015

– Rutgers Cancer Institute of New Jersey

Ludwig’s Tyler Jacks Speaks About Mouse Models and Use of Genome-Editing Tools to Hasten Discovery in Cancer Research

Ludwig MIT researcher Tyler Jacks will deliver an address titled “Engineering the Cancer Genome” during the opening plenary session of the 2015 Annual Meeting of the American Association for Cancer Research on insights gleaned from mouse models of cancer.

(Embargo expired on 19-Apr-2015 at 09:30 ET)

AACR Annual Meeting 2015

– Ludwig Cancer Research

Making the Most of Your Pathology Report: Four Tips for Women Diagnosed with Breast Cancer

The CAP and Dr. Jean Simpson offer tips and questions for women who are diagnosed with breast cancer to better understand their diagnosis to make informed decisions about their health.

 • Video embedded • 

– College of American Pathologists (CAP)

Obesity Significantly Increases Prostate Cancer Risk in African-American Men

Obesity in black men substantially increases the risk of low- and high-grade prostate cancer, while obesity in white men moderately reduces the risk of low-grade cancer and only slightly increases the risk of high-grade cancer, according to the first large, prospective study to examine how race and obesity jointly affect prostate cancer risk.

 • Image(s) embedded •  (Embargo expired on 16-Apr-2015 at 11:00 ET)

JAMA Oncology; CA37429; 5UM1CA182883; R25CA094880

– Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center

Red Journal’s May Issue Focuses on the Vital Role of Radiation Therapy in Modern Lymphoma Treatment

The “Radiation and the Modern Management of Lymphoma” issue (May 1, 2015) of the International Journal of Radiation Oncology • Biology • Physics (Red Journal), the official scientific journal of the American Society for Radiation Oncology (ASTRO), is focused on the integral role of radiation therapy in current lymphoma treatment.

International Journal of Radiation Oncology, Biology, Physics

– American Society for Radiation Oncology (ASTRO)

Trending Stories Report for 16 April 2015

Trending news releases with the most views in a single day. Topics include:sustainability, COPD, neurology, cancer, sleep, food, and genetics.

– Newswise Trends

Tumors Prefer the Easy Way Out

Researchers from Cornell University describe a new way cancer cells invade other parts of the body, identifying a new treatment target that may be more effective than current drugs.This article was chosen as an APSselect article for April.

American Journal of Physiology - Cell Physiology,15 Mar-2015

– American Physiological Society (APS)

Research Finds No Correlation between Regulatory T Cells and Survival in Glioblastoma

Using a novel methodology of epigenetic quantitative analysis, investigators found no correlation between regulatory T cells and survival in the tumor microenvironment or blood, even when adjusting for well-known prognostic factors.

Neuro-Oncology; CCSG P30; CA023108; 5P20RR024475-02; 8 P20 GM103534-02; RO1-HL074175

– Norris Cotton Cancer Center Dartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center

Zinc Deficiency Linked to Activation of Hedgehog Signaling Pathway

Zinc deficiency – long associated with numerous diseases, e.g. autism, lung cancer, prostate cancer, and ovarian cancers – can lead to activation of the Hedgehog signaling pathway, a biomolecular pathway that plays essential roles in developing organisms and in diseases, according to new research at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute.

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– Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute (RPI)

Potential for Prediction of Progression for Early Form of Breast Cancer

Scientists in Manchester have identified a way to potentially predict which patients with an early form of breast cancer will experience disease progression.

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Annals of Oncology, Feb 2015

– University of Manchester

Trending Stories Report for 15 April 2015

Trending news releases with the most views in a single day. Topics include: robotics, nicotine and alcohol, stem cells, vision, cancer, pregnancy, racial disparities in smoking risk, and herbal therapy for cardiac hypertrophy

– Newswise Trends

Early Use of Palliative Care in Cancer Improves Patients' Lives, Outcomes for Caregivers

A new randomized clinical trial has noted significant improvement in several measures among those who began palliative care early.

Journal of Clinical Oncology; R01NR011871 ; R03NR014915 ; P30CA023108 ; UL1 TR001086 ; MRSG 12-113-01-CPPB

– Norris Cotton Cancer Center Dartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center

Study Points to Possible New Treatment for HER2+ Breast Cancer

Elevated PARP1 polymerase in HER2+ breast cancer may confer susceptibility to PARP inhibitor drugs. This proof of concept study using breast cancer tissue from 307 cancer patients lays the groundwork for future clinical trials.

 • Image(s) embedded • 

– University of Alabama at Birmingham

GW Cancer Institute Publishes Core Competencies for Oncology Patient Navigators

The George Washington University Cancer Institute has finalized 45 core competency statements for oncology patient navigators, published in the Journal of Oncology Navigation and Survivorship.

Journal of Oncology Navigation

– George Washington University

New "4-D" Lung Cancer Model Could Quicken Discoveries

Researchers at Houston Methodist have invented a new, ex vivo lung cancer model that mimics the process of tumor progression. Tests of the model are published this month in The Annals of Thoracic Surgery (now online).

 • Image(s) embedded • 

The Annals of Thoracic Surgery

– Houston Methodist

University Hospitals Geauga Medical Center Performs First-Ever Prostate Cancer Treatment with New Device

Radiation oncology doctors at University Hospitals Geauga Medical Center perform the first-ever prostate cancer treatment with the newly approved SpaceOAR, which is an injectable gel that creates a space between the prostate and the rectum to move the rectum away from radiation used in treatment.

 • Image(s) embedded • 

– University Hospitals Case Medical Center

Rare, Deadly Lymphoma Demystified

The first-ever systematic study of the genomes of patients with ALK-negative anaplastic large cell lymphoma (ALCL), a particularly aggressive form of non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma, shows that many cases of the disease are driven by alterations in the JAK/STAT3 cell signaling pathway.

 • Video / Image(s) embedded • 

Cancer Cell; R01 CA185486; R01 CA179044; U54 CA121852

– Columbia University Medical Center

Reconceptualizing Stress in Cancer Treatment

Dartmouth investigators point to the shortcomings of using the word stress in a medical or scientific context and encourage bodymind therapies to treat trauma in patients with cancer.

Frontiers in Human Neuroscience

– Norris Cotton Cancer Center Dartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center

Announcements

Yale Joins Lung Cancer Dream Team

Yale Cancer Center will join a group of prominent cancer research and treatment institutions in a new Stand Up To Cancer (SU2C) – American Cancer Society $20 million Dream Team to combat lung cancer.

– Yale Cancer Center

Moon Shots Program Researchers to Contribute to New Stand Up to Cancer Dream Teams

Researchers pursuing answers to KRAS-mutated lung cancer and ovarian cancer prevention in MD Anderson's Moon Shots Program are chosen for similar roles in SU2C Dream Teams.

– University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center

Yale Launches National Study of Personalized Medicine for Metastatic Melanoma

Yale University has launched a multicenter clinical trial, sponsored by Stand Up to Cancer and Melanoma Research Alliance, that will apply the latest in personalized medicine technology to treat metastatic melanoma. The trial, for which Yale is a lead site, will enroll patients lacking a particular genetic mutation for whom immune therapy did not work or was not an option.

– Yale Cancer Center

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