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Newswise Special Wire
Tuesday, June 2, 2015

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Newswise Cancer Research Wire for 02-Jun-2015
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Cancer Research Wire

Cancer research news for the public and news media. More stories can be found at the Newswise Cancer News Source.

New Research Suggests That Pre-Existing Inflammation May Promote the Spread of Cancer

There is mounting evidence that chronic inflammation is linked to increased risk of tumor development. A new study is helping to shed light on the important link between inflammation and cancer, and how pre-existing inflammation may aid in the metastatic process.

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Journal of Leukocyte Biology

– Florida Atlantic University

New Study Reviews Undertreated Side Effect From Cancer Treatment and Recommendations for Managing Symptoms

Investigators from Montefiore Einstein Center for Cancer Care have announced new findings from an extensive literature review published today in the Annals of Oncology. This review found that side effects from regorafenib like redness and swelling may be undertreated. Also included are recommendations from experienced oncologists and dermatologists that outline supportive measures to help prevent or reduce Hand-Foot-Skin-Reaction (HFSR) symptoms. Better management of HFSR may allow patients to continue to take regorafenib at an optimal dose.

Annals of Oncology

– Montefiore Medical Center

Programming Probiotics for Early Detection of Liver Cancer

Scientists at the University of California, San Diego and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) have described a new method for detecting liver cancer metastases in mice. The approach uses over-the-counter probiotics genetically programmed to produce signals easily detectable in urine when liver cancer metastases are present. The results of the new study, published in the May 27 issue of Science Translational Medicine, indicate that genetically-programmed probiotics may be useful for detecting liver cancer metastases early-on in the progression of the disease.

Science Translational Medicine

– University of California, San Diego

Multimodality Treatment for Metastatic Lung Cancer That Includes Surgery May Improve Survival Rates

Patients diagnosed with an advanced form of metastatic non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) may benefit from surgical resection (removal of all or part of the lung) in combination with chemotherapy and radiation therapy

Annals of Thoracic Surgery

– Society of Thoracic Surgeons

Immunotherapy Drug Improves Survival for Common Form of Lung Cancer

In a head-to-head clinical trial comparing standard chemotherapy with the immunotherapy drug nivolumab, researchers found that people with squamous-non-small cell lung cancer who received nivolumab lived, on average, 3.2 months longer than those receiving chemotherapy. Squamous non-small cell lung cancer accounts for 25 to 30 percent of all lung malignancies.

(Embargo expired on 31-May-2015 at 17:30 ET)

New England Journal of Medicine

– Johns Hopkins Medicine

Immunotherapy Combo Increases Progression-Free Survival in Advanced Melanoma Patients

Treating advanced melanoma patients with either a combination of the immunotherapy drugs nivolumab and ipilimumab or nivolumab alone significantly increases progression-free survival over using ipilimumab alone, according to Memorial Sloan Kettering researchers.

(Embargo expired on 31-May-2015 at 07:30 ET)

New England Journal of Medicine; 2015 ASCO Annual Meeting

– Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center

Phase 3 Trial Led by Ludwig Researchers Confirms Power of Combination Immunotherapy for Advanced Melanoma

A Phase 3, multicenter clinical trial led by Ludwig Cancer Research investigators Jedd Wolchok and Stephen Hodi shows that the combination of two immunotherapies—ipilimumab and nivolumab—induces more frequent responses and considerably longer progression-free survival in patients with advanced melanoma than the administration of either of them alone. The results of the trial, which confirm those of a smaller study similarly conducted in previously untreated patients by the same Ludwig scientists, were presented today at the 2015 American Society for Clinical Oncology Annual Meeting and published online later today in the New England Journal of Medicine.

(Embargo expired on 31-May-2015 at 07:30 ET)

New England Journal of Medicine; 2015 ASCO Annual Meeting

– Ludwig Cancer Research

Risks of Whole Brain Radiation Therapy Added to Radiosurgery Outweigh Benefits for Patients with Limited Brain Metastases

Whole Brain Radiation Therapy (WBRT) is associated with significantly worse cognitive function than radiosurgery, and should no longer be used in the adjuvant setting after radiosurgery to treat cancer patients with brain metastases, according to a large study led by a researcher at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center.

 • Image(s) embedded •  (Embargo expired on 31-May-2015 at 07:30 ET)

ASCO Meeting

– University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center

Phase III Study Confirms Benefits of Lenalidomide Maintenance Therapy for Patients with Multiple Myeloma

A large cooperative-group study has confirmed previous evidence that lenalidomide delays time to disease progression for patients with multiple myeloma and is an important treatment option for patients with the disease.

ASCOAnnual Meeting, May-2015; U10CA180821; U10CA180882; U01HL069294; U10CA21115; U10CA031946; U10CA33601

– Roswell Park Cancer Institute

Duke’s Poliovirus Study Finds That Less Is More

A modified poliovirus therapy that is showing promising results for patients with glioblastoma brain tumors works best at a low dosage, according to the research team at Duke’s Preston Robert Tisch Brain Tumor Center where the investigational therapy is being pioneered.

ASCO Annual Meeting 2015

– Duke Medicine

Removing More Tissue During Breast Cancer Surgery Reduces by Half the Need for Second Procedure

Removing more tissue during a partial mastectomy could spare thousands of breast cancer patients a second surgery, according to a Yale Cancer Center study. The findings were published online May 30 in the New England Journal of Medicine and presented at the 2015 Annual Meeting of the American Society of Clinical Oncology in Chicago.

 • Image(s) embedded •  (Embargo expired on 30-May-2015 at 09:00 ET)

New England Journal of Medicine; 2015 Annual Meeting of the American Society of Clinical Oncology

– Yale Cancer Center

Study Identifies Possible New Combination Chemotherapy for Patients with Advanced Prostate Cancer

A role for combination therapy using two or more chemotherapy agents at the same time has not been well studied. This week, however, results of a clinical trial presented at the American Society of Clinical Oncology meeting by researchers at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center may change the perspective on a role for combination chemotherapy in advanced disease.

 • Image(s) embedded •  (Embargo expired on 30-May-2015 at 15:00 ET)

ASCO Meeting

– University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center

Practice-Changing Study Offers New Option for Tough Breast Cancer Cases

A new phase 3 study in some of the most difficult-to-treat patients, women with endocrine-resistant disease, showed that the newly approved drug, palbociclib, more than doubled the time to cancer recurrence for women with hormone-receptor (HR+) positive metastatic breast cancer.

(Embargo expired on 30-May-2015 at 07:30 ET)

New England Journal of Medicine; ASCO Meeting

– Thomas Jefferson University

Mount Sinai Researchers to Present Key Cancer Trial Data at ASCO

Mount Sinai Health System faculty will be presenting research updates on a lymphoma vaccine clinical trial, the best dosing for a drug against metastatic cancer, and new treatment strategies in relapsed multiple myeloma at the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) annual meeting, May 29 – June 2, 2015, in Chicago.

(Embargo expired on 30-May-2015 at 08:00 ET)

ASCO Annual Meeting, May-2015

– Mount Sinai Medical Center

Targeted Drug Can ‘Diminish the Suffering’ of Myelofibrosis Say Mayo Clinic Researchers

CHICAGO — Use of the targeted agent pacritinib significantly reduced the symptoms and burden of advanced myelofibrosis in patients, says a Mayo Clinic researcher who co-led PERSIST-1, the worldwide phase 3 clinical trial that tested the therapy. Specifically, pacritinib substantially reduced severe enlargement of the spleen, a typical feature of advanced myelofibrosis, in more than 20 percent of patients and alleviated debilitating side effects in more than 46 percent.

ASCO Meeting

– Mayo Clinic

Anastrozole Prevents Recurrence Better Than Tamoxifen in Postmenopausal Women with Noninvasive Breast Cancer

Anastrozole provides a significant benefit compared with tamoxifen in preventing recurrence after a lumpectomy and radiation therapy in postmenopausal women ages 60 years or younger who had DCIS (ductal carcinoma in situ), a common diagnosis of non-invasive breast cancer. In women over age 60, it works as well as tamoxifen. These findings were presented today at the 2015 ASCO Annual Meeting in Chicago. The benefit reported in this trial appeared later in follow up of the women in the study.

2015 ASCO Annual Meeting

– Loyola University Health System

Small Study Shows Genetic Biomarker May Predict Cancer Patients' Response to Immunotherapy Drug

In a report of a proof-of-principle study of patients with colon and other cancers for whom standard therapies failed, researchers at the Johns Hopkins Kimmel Cancer Center say that mistakes in so-called mismatch repair genes, first identified by Johns Hopkins and other scientists two decades ago, may accurately predict who will respond to certain immunotherapy drugs known as PD-1 inhibitors.

(Embargo expired on 29-May-2015 at 14:00 ET)

New England Journal of Medicine; P50CA062924; CA163672; CA43460; CA67941; CA16058; CA57345

– Johns Hopkins Medicine

Phase 2 Trial Identifies Genetic Dysfunction That Makes Many Types of Cancer Vulnerable to an Immunotherapy

A team of researchers led by Ludwig Cancer Research investigator Luis Diaz has identified a genetic malfunction that predicts the effectiveness of response to a groundbreaking immunotherapy. The results of their Phase 2 clinical trial reveal that, regardless of its tissue of origin, tumors whose cells are deficient in repairing mismatched DNA sequences—and so preventing mutations—are far more susceptible to the checkpoint inhibitor pembrolizumab than those that retain this ability. Their findings were announced today at the American Society for Clinical Oncology Annual Meeting and will be published online May 30 in the New England Journal of Medicine (NEJM).

(Embargo expired on 29-May-2015 at 14:00 ET)

NEJM; 2015 ASCO Annual Meeting

– Ludwig Cancer Research

ONT-380 Has Stage IV HER2+ Breast Cancer Patient “Worrying About Normal Stuff Again”

Promising clinical trial results presented at the American Society for Clinical Oncology (ASCO) Annual Meeting 2015 show activity of the investigational anti-cancer agent ONT-380 against HER2+ breast cancer, in one case specifically against brain metastases and in another case in overall survival of heavily pretreated HER2+ breast cancer patients.

ASCO 2015; Abstract #612; Abstract #602

– University of Colorado Cancer Center

Study Shows Sexual Dysfunction After Gynecologic Cancer Treatment

A University of Colorado Cancer Center study presented at the American Society for Clinical Oncology (ASCO) Annual Meeting 2015 shows decreased sexual activity in women following treatment for gynecologic cancers, down from 6.1-6.8 times per month before treatment to 2.6-4.9 times per month after treatment.

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ASCO 2015; Abstract #9592

– University of Colorado Cancer Center

Biomarker Analysis Reveals Several Potential Treatment Targets in Subtype of Anal Cancer

A multiplatform biomarker analysis of squamous cell anal carcinoma samples led by Roswell Park in conjunction with Caris Life Sciences has revealed several actionable targets.

ASCO 2015

– Roswell Park Cancer Institute

UH Case Medical Center Experts to Present Data at 51st ASCO Annual Meeting

Researchers from University Hospitals Case Medical Center Seidman Cancer Center and Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine will present data from several new studies, including a study evaluating a potential novel combination treatment for cancer patients with advanced solid tumors and a first-of-its-kind analysis of gene mutations in small cell lung cancer (SCLC), at the 51st American Society for Clinical Oncology (ASCO) Annual Meeting in Chicago.

– University Hospitals Case Medical Center

Research Highlights From the Annual Meeting of the American Society of Clinical Oncology

Investigators at Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center will share new research findings at the annual meeting of the American Society of Clinical Oncology, or ASCO, which is being held May 29–June 2 in Chicago.

ASCO 2015

– Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center

Sanford-Burnham Researchers Identify a New Target for Treating Drug-Resistant Melanoma

Study explains why some melanoma tumors are resistant to BRAF inhibitor treatment

 • Image(s) embedded •  (Embargo expired on 28-May-2015 at 12:00 ET)

Cell Reports; CA128814

– Sanford-Burnham Medical Research Institute

MEDI4736 Combined with Tremelimumab Results in Acceptable Toxicity, Clinical Activity in Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Patients

Advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients have few effective treatment options and low 5-year survival rates. The checkpoint inhibitors MEDI4736 and tremelimumab have both demonstrated acceptable safety and potential efficacy when used as single-agents in several different types of cancer. Scott J. Antonia, M.D., Ph.D., chair of the Thoracic Oncology Department at Moffitt Cancer Center will be presenting data from a phase 1b dose-escalation and expansion study of MEDI4736 combined with tremelimumab at the 2015 American Society of Clinical Oncology Annual Meeting in Chicago.

ASCO 2015

– Moffitt Cancer Center

Component in Green Tea May Help Reduce Prostate Cancer in Men at High Risk

Prostate cancer is the second most common type of cancer in men and is predicted to result in an estimated 220,00 cases in the United States in 2015. In recent years, an emphasis has been placed on chemoprevention – the use of agents to prevent the development or progression of prostate cancer. A team of researchers led by Nagi B. Kumar, Ph.D., R.D., F.A.D.A. at Moffitt Cancer Center recently published results of a randomized trial that assessed the safety and effectiveness of the active components in green tea to prevent prostate cancer development in men who have premalignant lesions. The results will be presented at the 2015 American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) Annual Meeting in Chicago.

ASCO 2015

– Moffitt Cancer Center

JAK2 Inhibitor Ruxolitinib has Minimal Toxicity, Promising Efficacy in Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia Patients

Chronic myelomonocytic leukemia (CMML) is a rare type of myelodysplastic, myeloproliferative neoplasm characterized by increased numbers of peripheral monocytes and less than 20 percent blasts. CMML has few treatment options and patients only survive on average for 12 to 24 months. Preclinical studies suggest that JAK2 inhibitors may be an effective treatment option for CMML. Eric Padron, M.D., assistant member of the Malignant Hematology Program at Moffitt Cancer Center will report on the first phase 1 study of the JAK2 inhibitor ruxolitinib in CMML patients at the 2015 American Society of Clinical Oncology Annual Meeting in Chicago.

ASCO 2015

– Moffitt Cancer Center

Nivolumab Treatment in Melanoma Patients has Manageable Safety Profile, Additional Immunomodulatory Agents Do Not Affect Response Rates

The monoclonal antibody nivolumab has shown promise as a therapeutic agent, particularly by improving the survival rates of melanoma patients. Jeffrey S. Weber, M.D., Ph.D., director of the Donald A. Adam Comprehensive Melanoma Research Center at Moffitt Cancer Center will be presenting data from a retrospective analysis of the safety of nivolumab in 4 ongoing phase I-III studies in melanoma patients at the 2015 American Society of Clinical Oncology Annual Meeting in Chicago

ASCO

– Moffitt Cancer Center

Entolimod May Be a Promising Treatment Option for Many Solid Tumors

A collaborative team of researchers led by Alex A. Adjei, MD, PhD, FACP, of Roswell Park Cancer Institute (RPCI) will share results from the first clinical study of the anticancer effects of the novel agent entolimod at the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) 51st Annual Meeting in Chicago. Their findings confirm preclinical evidence that the agent, which is derived from salmonella flagellin, is worthy of further investigation as treatment for some of the most common and most resilient solid-tumor cancers.

ASCO meeting

– Roswell Park Cancer Institute

Melanoma Patients Treated with a Modified Cold Sore (Herpes) Virus Had Improved Survival

Scientists have found that stage IIIb to IV melanoma patients treated with a modified cold sore (herpes) virus had improved survival. The results of the findings were published recently in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

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Journal of Clinical Oncology

– University of Louisville

Roswell Park Scientists Develop Mobile Application Software for Colon Cancer Survivors

Roswell Park Cancer Institute (RPCI) researchers have developed an accurate, individualized post-operative survival calculator and integrated the technology into a mobile application compatible with smartphone technology for oncologists and patients diagnosed with colon cancer. Information about the calculator will be presented at the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) 51st Annual Meeting in Chicago.

ASCO Meeting

– Roswell Park Cancer Institute

Phase III Results of RTOG 0537 Indicate That Acupuncture-Like Electrical Nerve Stimulation May Provide Symptom Relief Comparable to the Current Treatment for Radiation-Induced Dry Mouth

Phase III results of Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) 0537 indicate that acupuncture-like, transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (ALTENS) may be equally effective as pilocarpine, the current prescription medication in a pill, to treat radiation-induced xerostomia (dry mouth), according to a study published in the June 1, 2015 issue of the International Journal of Radiation Oncology • Biology • Physics.

International Journal of Radiation Oncology • Biology • Physics, June 1, 2015

– American Society for Radiation Oncology (ASTRO)

Leah’s Legacy: Children’s Book “Wings of Courage” Tribute to 5-Year-Old Livonia Girl Who Fought Cancer

Nearly 10 years after the Livonia preschooler Leah James lost her battle to an inoperable brain tumor, she has inspired a children’s book designed to help other families like hers cope with a cancer diagnosis.

 • Video / Image(s) embedded • 

– University of Michigan Health System

State Regulations for Indoor Tanning Could Lead to a National Regulatory Framework

A national regulatory framework designed to prevent and limit indoor tanning is needed to alleviate the cancer burden and reduce the billions in financial costs from preventable skin cancer, say two Georgetown University public health experts.

(Embargo expired on 27-May-2015 at 11:00 ET)

JAMA

– Georgetown Lombardi Comprehensive Cancer Center

Dartmouth Research Finds Common Cancer Drug Increases Collagen in Melanoma

Collagen is the most abundant protein in the human body, and investigators are uncertain how its presence affects the behavior of melanoma cells.

Matrix Biology Journal; R01 AR-26599 ; CA-77267 (CEB); NIH P30 ; P30RR032136; NIH T32 ; AI007363 ; R01 CA134799 (DWM)

– Norris Cotton Cancer Center Dartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center

Pinpointing Natural Cancer Drug's True Origins Brings Sustainable Production a Step Closer

For decades, scientists have known that ET-743, a compound extracted from a marine invertebrate called a mangrove tunicate, can kill cancer cells. The drug has been approved for use in patients in Europe and is in clinical trials in the U.S.

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Environmental Microbiology

– University of Michigan

Diagnosing Cancer with Help From Bacteria

Engineers at MIT and the University of California at San Diego have devised a new way to detect cancer that has spread to the liver, by enlisting help from probiotics — beneficial bacteria similar to those found in yogurt.

Science Translational Medicine, May-2015

– Koch Institute for Integrative Cancer Research at MIT

Trial Creates 6 Percent Weight Loss After Breast Cancer Treatment

Obesity is a risk factor for breast cancer. A multi-institutional study presented at the American Society for Clinical Oncology (ASCO) Annual Meeting 2015 shows that female breast cancer survivors are able to lose weight through modest lifestyle changes.

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ASCO 2015; ASCO Abstract

– University of Colorado Cancer Center

Promising Trial Results of Brigatinib Show That All Next-Gen ALK Inhibitors May Not Be Created Equal

Phase I/II clinical trial results reported at the American Society for Clinical Oncology (ASCO) Annual Meeting 2015 show promising results for investigational drug brigatinib against ALK+ non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), with 58 of 78 ALK+ patients responding to treatment, including 50 of 70 patients who had progressed after previous treatment with crizotinib, the first licensed ALK inhibitor. Progression-free survival (PFS) in patients previously treated with crizotinib was 13.4 months.

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ASCO Abstract; ASCO 2015

– University of Colorado Cancer Center

Malfunction in Cancer-Preventing NONO Protein Worsens Effects of UV Radiation

Researchers have uncovered a new molecular mechanism - a function of the NONO protein - whereby cells protect their genome from the detrimental effect of UV radiation and govern DNA replication in cellular mitosis. A recent study investigates what happens when this molecular mechanism malfunctions.

Oncogene

– Sbarro Health Research Organization (SHRO)

UAB Study Identifies Pathway That May Cause Seizures and Shorten Survival for Patients with Severe Brain Tumors

Researchers at UAB have identified a chemical pathway that may be associated with seizures and shorter patient survival in some patients with malignant glioma, the most common and deadly form of brain tumor. The researchers suggest that a transporter known as SXC is responsible for boosting levels of glutamate in the brains of some glioma patients.

Science Translational Medicine

– University of Alabama at Birmingham

ASCO Media Advisory: Research Roundup from Penn's Abramson Cancer Center

Researchers from the Abramson Cancer Center of the University of Pennsylvania and Penn’s Perelman School of Medicine will present results from several clinical trials and other key studies during the 2015 American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) Annual Meeting from May 29 through June 2.

ASCO Annual Meeting

– Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania

Cancer Genetic Counselor Helps People to Look Beyond the Numbers

Shawnia Ryan, MS, CGC is the second certified cancer genetic counselor in the state of New Mexico. She helps people make sense of the statistics and genetic information to answer their personal cancer genetic questions.

Expert(s) available

– University of New Mexico Cancer Center

Clinical Trial Reduces Stress of Cancer Caregivers

Cancer caregivers are stressed, potentially impacting the quality of the care they give. A University of Colorado Cancer Center clinical trial demonstrates how to help.

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Bone Marrow Transplantation; R01 CA126971/CA/NCI NIH HHS/United States

– University of Colorado Cancer Center

Investigational Immunotherapy Treatment Shows Durable Response in Patients with Metastatic Melanoma

Research by Howard L. Kaufman, MD, FACS, associate director for clinical science and chief surgical officer at Rutgers Cancer Institute of New Jersey and colleagues shows advanced-stage melanoma patients have significant improvement in durable response rate when treated with a genetically-modified form of a herpes virus, whose native form causes the common cold sore.

 • Image(s) embedded • 

Journal of Clinical Oncology, May-2015

– Rutgers Cancer Institute of New Jersey

Melanoma, Pediatric Oncology, Lymphoma Dominate Research Presentations from NYU Langone Medical Center at ASCO 2015

NYU Langone Medical Center and its Laura and Isaac Perlmutter Cancer Center will have a high profile at the 51st Annual Meeting of the American Society for Clinical Oncology (ASCO), with researchers presenting close to 30 abstracts accepted for oral, poster and publication presentations.

ASCO 2105

– NYU Langone Medical Center

Ludwig Scientists to Report Advances in Treatment of Brain, Skin, Gastrointestinal Cancers at 2015 ASCO Annual Meeting

Ludwig Cancer Research previewed today the new findings that will be presented by Ludwig scientists at this year’s American Society for Clinical Oncology Annual Meeting in Chicago, Ill., May 29 – June 2. Ludwig researchers will present recent data from early and late stage clinical trials and participate in a number of plenary and educational sessions.

2015 ASCO Annual Meeting

– Ludwig Cancer Research

Nanotechnology Identifies Brain Tumor Types Through MRI “Virtual Biopsy” in Animal Studies

Biomedical researchers at Cedars-Sinai have invented a tiny drug-delivery system that can identify cancer cell types in the brain through “virtual biopsies” and then attack the molecular structure of the disease.

ACS Nano

– Cedars-Sinai Medical Center

Announcements

CPRIT Awards $16.6 Million for Cancer Research, Prevention, and Faculty Recruitment at UT Southwestern Medical Center

The Cancer Prevention and Research Institute of Texas (CPRIT) has awarded UT Southwestern Medical Center researchers more than $12.6 million in research grants for cancer research and prevention, as well as an additional $4 million for recruiting cancer scientists.

– UT Southwestern Medical Center

Montefiore Einstein Center for Cancer Care Director Named President of the American Association of Endocrine Surgeons

Montefiore Einstein Center for Cancer Care Director Dr. Steven Libutti has been named President of the American Association of Endocrine Surgeons

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– Montefiore Medical Center

Higher Education Events

Oncology Experts to Deliberate Tissue Allocation Issues at Upcoming NCCN Policy Summit

The National Comprehensive Cancer Network® (NCCN®) will host Emerging Issues in Tissue Allocation, on June 8, 2015, at the National Press Club in Washington, DC.

– National Comprehensive Cancer Network® (NCCN®)

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