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Newswise Special Wire
Tuesday, December 8, 2015

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Newswise Cancer Research Wire for 08-Dec-2015
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Cancer Research Wire

Cancer research news for the public and news media. More stories can be found at the Newswise Cancer News Source.

Experimental “Urban Garden” Helps Cancer Survivors’ Lower Risk for Recurrence and Chronic Illness

While there is substantial evidence that diet and body weight can impact cancer development, recurrence, and progression – for the estimated 14.5 million cancer survivors in the US, there are few resources available to help them optimize their dietary patterns and lifestyle behaviors after active cancer treatment is over. Now, new research shows that cancer survivors who participated in a multifaceted urban garden intervention improved their health behaviors, significantly reduced their weight, and improved biomarkers of health – all major improvements related to a reduced risk for developing a secondary cancer or illnesses like diabetes or heart disease. The unique program is promising and could be used as an evidence-based blueprint for other chronic conditions.

 • Video / Image(s) embedded • 

UL1TR001070

– Ohio State University Center for Clinical and Translational Science

Testosterone-Lowering Therapy for Prostate Cancer May Increase Alzheimer’s Risk

Men taking androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) for prostate cancer were almost twice as likely to be diagnosed with Alzheimer’s disease in the years that followed than those who didn’t undergo the therapy, an analysis of medical records from two large hospital systems by Penn Medicine and Stanford University researchers has shown.

 • Image(s) embedded •  (Embargo expired on 07-Dec-2015 at 16:00 ET)

Journal of Clinical Oncology; U54HG004028; R01LM011369; R01GM101430

– Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania

High Response Rates, Long-Term Remissions Seen in Penn Trials of Personalized Cellular Therapy CTL019 for Pediatric and Adult Blood Cancers

Ninety-three percent of pediatric patients (55 of 59) with relapsed/refractory acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) went into remission after receiving an investigational therapy made from their own immune cells, with continuous remissions of over one year in 18 patients and over two years in nine patients. In an emerging new use of the same therapy, known as CTL019, more than half of patients (15 of 28) with non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) also responded to infusions of the personalized cellular therapy.

(Embargo expired on 07-Dec-2015 at 14:45 ET)

American Society of Hematology Annual Meeting

– Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania

Cancer Patient Symptom Surveys Linked to Reduced ER Visits, Improved Survival and Quality of Life

An Internet-based system for symptom collection benefited patients while giving them a clearer voice in their own care.

 • Image(s) embedded •  (Embargo expired on 07-Dec-2015 at 16:05 ET)

Journal of Clinical Oncology, Dec-2015

– University of North Carolina Health Care System

Novel Drug Combinations and the First Integrative Genetic Analysis of RNA Sequencing in Myeloma

Researchers Present Results at American Society of Hematology Meeting

(Embargo expired on 07-Dec-2015 at 17:45 ET)

2015 American Society of Hematology (ASH) meeting

– Mount Sinai Health System

Loss of Enzyme Promotes Tumor Progression in Endometrial Cancer

Scientists have shown for the first time why loss of the enzyme CD73 in human cancer promotes tumor progression.

 • Image(s) embedded •  (Embargo expired on 07-Dec-2015 at 16:00 ET)

P50CA098258; TL1RR024147; P30CA016672

– University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center

Biochemists Shed New Light on Using Photo-Activated Compounds for Targeted Therapy

Researchers at St. Mary’s College of Maryland recently focused their attention on the chemotherapeutic use of an azo- compound (azo- compounds contain a nitrogen-nitrogen double bond) that they designed to convert from an inactive to an active form when exposed to blue or near-UV wavelength light.

 • Audio embedded • 

Organic Letters, Sept-2015

– St. Mary's College of Maryland

NUS Scientists Discover New Cellular Mechanism for Potential Target Protein for Acute Myeloid Leukemia

A team of researchers from the National University of Singapore has found a new significant correlation between the protein nucleophosmin and the development of an aggressive form of blood cancer called acute myeloid leukemia (AML). The team, led by Professor Lim Tit Meng from the Department of Biological Sciences at the NUS Faculty of Science, explained the puzzling phenomenon of AML cells appearing like normal cells even though they are cancerous. The team discovered that the mutated form of the protein which is found in about one-third of AML cases, is associated with a novel cellular mechanism that develops AML cells containing normal chromosomes.

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Scientific Reports 5, Article number: 11777 doi:10.1038/srep11777, 30 June 2015

– National University of Singapore

“Dark Matter” in Cancer Genome Prompts Immune Response

Researchers say the immune response comes from RNA with pathogen-like features

PNAS

– Mount Sinai Health System

New Technology Developed at UH Seidman Cancer Center May Standardize Sickle Cell Disease Screenings for Infants in Developing Countries

Researchers from Seidman Cancer Center at University Hospitals Case Medical Center and Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine presented new research findings this weekend at the Annual Meeting of the American Society of Hematology. In a poster presentation (Abstract #3379), Yunus Alapan, Umut Gurkan PhD and Jane Little, MD presented promising findings related to new technology aimed at facilitating early detection of sickle cell disease for infants in developing countries.

– University Hospitals Case Medical Center

Obesity Contributes to Ovarian Cancer Metastasis

A large number of studies have shown that an increased body mass index is associated with a greater risk for ovarian cancer with worse overall survival. However, the influence of obesity on ovarian cancer metastasis had not been evaluated. Researchers from the University of Notre Dame and its affiliated Harper Cancer Research Institute set out to determine whether obesity contributes to ovarian cancer metastatic success. In other words, are tumor cells better able to successfully metastasize when the “host” is obese versus lean?

Cancer Research, Nov-2015

– University of Notre Dame

Oral Chemo Still Too Expensive Even after Doughnut Hole Closes

Oral chemotherapy drugs are so expensive that they will be out of the financial reach of most Medicare patients even when the Part D doughnut hole closes in 2020, according to new study from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.

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Journal of Clinical Oncology, Dec-2015

– University of North Carolina Health Care System

Leading HIFU Expert Begins U.S.-Based Program with Treatment of First Prostate Cancer Patients

Stephen Scionti, M.D., medical director of Vituro Health, performed his first two HIFU procedures on American soil in early December.

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Expert(s) available

– Vituro Health

New Vaccine Strategy Better Protects High-Risk Cancer Patients From Flu

Yale Cancer Center researchers have developed a vaccine strategy that reduces the risk of flu infections in cancer patients at highest risk for influenza. The findings were presented Dec. 6 at the 57th annual meeting of the American Society of Hematology in Orlando, Florida.

 • Image(s) embedded •  (Embargo expired on 06-Dec-2015 at 18:00 ET)

– Yale Cancer Center

Yale Researchers Find New Pathway Underlying Multiple Myeloma Relapse

One of the biggest questions about the treatment of multiple myeloma, a form of blood cancer, is why nearly all patients treated with current therapies eventually suffer relapse. A Yale Cancer Center study may have solved this mystery by identifying how cancer cells escape treatment, leading to recurrence. The findings were presented Dec. 6 at the 57th annual meeting of the American Hematologic Society in Orlando, Florida.

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– Yale Cancer Center

Mutations in Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia Suggest Potential New Uses of Existing Cancer Drugs

Mining the DNA of chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) patients uncovered 12 mutations that may be targetable using therapies already available for other cancers, Penn Medicine researchers reported at the 57th annual meeting of the American Society of Hematology.

(Embargo expired on 06-Dec-2015 at 18:00 ET)

American Society of Hematology Annual Meeting

– Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania

Study Shows Ibrutinib Superior to Traditional Chemotherapy in Untreated Chronic Leukemia Patients

A multi-center, international, randomized, Phase III study of older untreated patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) demonstrated that ibrutinib, a kinase inhibitor, is significantly more effective than traditional chemotherapy with chlorambucil.

 • Image(s) embedded •  (Embargo expired on 06-Dec-2015 at 11:00 ET)

– University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center

Placental Cell Therapy Mitigates Bone Marrow Damage Caused by High Levels of Radiation

New data presented at this year’s American Society of Hematology shows the mechanism of action by which cell therapy derived from the human placenta treats radiation-induced bone marrow damage. The findings will be published online in the December 3, 2015 supplemental volume of Blood, a peer-reviewed medical journal published by ASH.

American Society of Hematology (ASH)

– Pluristem Therapeutics

Making Cancer Care Personal

Researchers at the University of Iowa College of Dentistry are partnering with a private company to develop computer simulations that can help personalize cancer care by predicting how a patient will respond to a drug treatment.

 • Image(s) embedded •  (Embargo expired on 05-Dec-2015 at 17:30 ET)

– University of Iowa

Genetic Variants Tied to Increased Risk of Bone Complications in Young Leukemia Patients

Research led by St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital has identified genetic variations in young leukemia patients that are associated with an increased incidence of osteonecrosis, a serious cancer treatment side effect

(Embargo expired on 05-Dec-2015 at 09:00 ET)

ASH Annual Meeting, December 2015

– St. Jude Children's Research Hospital

‘Purity’ Of Tumor Samples May Significantly Bias Genomic Analyses

A new study by UC San Francisco scientists shows that the proportion of normal cells, especially immune cells, intermixed with cancerous cells in a given tissue sample may significantly skew the results of genetic analyses and other tests performed both by researchers and by physicians selecting precision therapies.

(Embargo expired on 04-Dec-2015 at 05:00 ET)

Nature Communications

– University of California, San Francisco (UCSF)

Discovery by NUS Researchers Contributes Towards Future Treatment of Cervical Cancer

A team of scientists from Cancer Science Institute of Singapore (CSI Singapore) at the National University of Singapore (NUS) has uncovered new molecular interactions involved in the development of cervical cancer. Proteins EDD1 and TIP60 were found to interact with the Human Papilloma Virus (HPV), which causes cervical cancer in humans. EDD1 is an E3 ubiquitin ligase involved in degrading cellular proteins, while TIP60 act as a tumor suppressor protein, and can both be found in the human body.

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Oncogene

– National University of Singapore

Rutgers Explores How Smokers Learn about E-Cigarettes

When it comes to learning about the safety of e-cigarettes, physicians are the most trusted source. The research from investigators at Rutgers Cancer Institute of New Jersey and Rutgers School of Public Health appears in the November 2015 issue of 'Preventive Medicine Reports.'

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Preventive Medicine Reports, Nov-2015

– Rutgers Cancer Institute of New Jersey

Montefiore-Einstein Investigators Present Research at 2015 American Society of Hematology Annual Meeting

Montefiore Einstein Center for Cancer Care, Albert Einstein Cancer Center and The Children’s Hospital at Montefiore present research at the American Society of Hematology’s annual meeting. Presentations include the first report on a genetic risk factor for avascular necrosis associated with treatment of acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) in children.

– Montefiore Medical Center

Montefiore-Einstein Investigators Present Research at 2015 American Society of Hematology Annual Meeting

Investigators at Montefiore Einstein Center for Cancer Care (MECCC), Albert Einstein College of Medicine’s NCI–designated Albert Einstein Cancer Center and The Children’s Hospital at Montefiore will present their research findings at the American Society of Hematology’s (ASH) 57th Annual Meeting and Exposition. Presentations include the first report on a genetic risk factor for avascular necrosis associated with treatment of acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) in children along with new insights into the molecular basis for acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and a novel approach to the treatment of this disease. ASH 2015 will take place December 5-8, 2015 at the Orange County Convention Center in Orlando, Florida.

American Society of Hematology’s (ASH) 57th Annual Meeting and Exposition, Dec 5-8, 2015

– Albert Einstein College of Medicine

UAMS Becomes Home to Cancer Imaging Archive for National Cancer Institute

The University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences (UAMS) has become home to The Cancer Imaging Archive of the National Cancer Institute (NCI) with the transfer to UAMS of more than 40 terabytes of data from the archive’s former home at Washington University in St. Louis.

– University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences

Researchers Use Ovarian Follicles to Preserve Fertility

Researchers at the University of Michigan have identified a potential new approach to fertility preservation for young cancer patients that addresses concerns about beginning cancer treatment immediately and the possibility of reintroducing cancer cells during the fertility preservation process.

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Scientific Reports; U54 HD076188

– University of Michigan Health System

Researchers Identify Biomarker of Early Lung Cancer That May Increase Survival

Researchers in Taiwan have identified a biomarker that detects the most common lung cancer in its earliest stage. The discovery could one day change how long lung cancer patients live.

– American Thoracic Society (ATS)

Depressed Head and Neck Cancer Patients Three-and-One-Half Times Less Likely to Survive, Have Higher Recurrence Risk

Depression is a significant predictor of five-year survival and recurrence in head and neck cancer patients, according to a new study from The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center.

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R25 CA056452; R03 CA108358; P30 CA016672; K07 CA 093512; R01 DE019141

– University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center

False-Positive Mammograms May Indicate Increased Risk of Breast Cancer Later

Women with a history of a false-positive mammogram result may be at increased risk of developing breast cancer for up to 10 years after the false-positive result, according to a study led by a researcher with the University of North Carolina Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center.

 • Image(s) embedded •  (Embargo expired on 02-Dec-2015 at 00:05 ET)

Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention

– University of North Carolina Health Care System

Genetic Mutations Differ Within a Single Tumor

When researchers looked at different areas within an individual rectal cancer sample, they found cases in which each area contained different genetic mutations. The findings could have significant implications for treatment recommendations.

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Laboratory Investigation; 5P50 CA130810 ; 5P30 CA046592

– University of Michigan Health System

Breast Density Alone Found Not to Be a Factor for Breast Cancer Risk

Although several studies suggest that women with denser breast tissue have an increased risk of breast cancer, a new study by Johns Hopkins researchers discredits breast density as a risk factor in and of itself, instead concluding that age and body fat, especially in the upper belly, contribute to the breast cancer seen in many patients.

European Radiology; CA154738

– Johns Hopkins Medicine

City of Hope Researchers Present Study Results at American Society of Hematology Meeting

Clinical trials that lay the groundwork for novel leukemia and lymphoma treatments will be among the highlights of the annual meeting of the American Society of Hematology (ASH) getting under way this week in Orlando. The trials, presented by researchers and physicians from City of Hope, could ultimately lead to innovative therapeutic approaches that improve survival and quality of life for patients with those and other diseases.

– City of Hope

Nivolumab Becomes First FDA-Approved Checkpoint Blockade for Kidney Cancer

New hope now exists for patients with advanced kidney cancer. Yesterday, the FDA approved the immunotherapy drug nivolumab (Opdivo®, Bristol-Myers Squibb) to treat metastatic renal cell carcinoma (RCC)—the most common form of kidney cancer—that has failed to respond to a previous treatment. This breakthrough can be traced all the way back to the research of scientists funded by the Cancer Research Institute (CRI).

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– Cancer Research Institute

Complete Surgical Excision Is the Most Effective Treatment for Breast Implant-Associated Anaplastic Large-Cell Lymphoma

The optimal treatment approach for most women with breast implant-associated anaplastic large-cell lymphoma (BI-ALCL) is complete surgical excision of the implant and surrounding capsule, according to an international study led by researchers at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center.

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Journal of Clinical Oncology; P30-CA016672

– University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center

City of Hope Rose Parade Float Highlights Cancer Patients’ Tomorrows

For people who have battled cancer, every new day is a new adventure. No one knows that better than the cancer doctor, nurse researcher and five cancer patients who will be riding City of Hope’s float at the 127th Tournament of Roses Parade on New Year’s Day.

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– City of Hope

Announcements

HOPA Introduces Expanded BCOP Recertification Education Opportunities for 2016

The Hematology/Oncology Pharmacy Association (HOPA) announces several new BCOP Recertification education opportunities to provide credit needed to ensure continued certification.

– Hematology Oncology Pharmacy Association

UT Southwestern Scientist Honored as Rising Star in Texas Research

The Academy of Medicine, Engineering and Science of Texas (TAMEST) has selected Dr. Joshua Mendell, Professor of Molecular Biology at UT Southwestern Medical Center and a Howard Hughes Medical Institute Investigator, as the recipient of the 2016 Edith and Peter O’Donnell Award in Medicine.

 • Image(s) embedded •  (Embargo expired on 08-Dec-2015 at 10:00 ET)

– UT Southwestern Medical Center

Neurosurgery Researchers Receive NIH Grants to Study Parkinson’s, Stroke, and Brain Cancer at Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine and University Hospitals Case Medical Center

Researchers from the Department of Neurological Surgery at Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine and University Hospitals Case Medical Center recently received multi-year, multi-million dollar grants from the National Institutes of Health (NIH) for studies in Parkinson’s disease, stroke, and brain cancer.

– University Hospitals Case Medical Center

Loyola Medicine Opens Cancer Center at Palos Community Hospital

The new Loyola Center for Cancer Care & Research at Palos Community Hospital is offering cancer patients academic level care close to home. The center opened Dec. 7 on Palos’ south campus at the Palos Primary Care Center at 15300 West Avenue in Orland Park.

– Loyola University Health System

Renowned Breast Cancer Surgeon, Colleagues Join Henry Ford Health System

Internationally renowned breast cancer surgeon Lisa A. Newman, M.D., MPH, has joined Henry Ford Health System to lead its metro Detroit breast cancer program and new international breast cancer research center.

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– Henry Ford Health System

Expert Pitch

Experts Available: Oncologists Issue First Comprehensive Post-Treatment Guidelines for Breast Cancer Survivors

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– Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center

Coping with Cancer During the Holidays? Re-Prioritize Your Traditions and Rituals, Experts Urge

 • Image(s) embedded • 

– City of Hope

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