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Newswise - News for Journalists

Newswise Special Wire
Monday, July 11, 2016

Public edition | newswise.com

Newswise Obesity News Source 11-Jul-2016
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Newswise Obesity News Source

Global Obesity Estimates May Miss More Than Half a Billion Worldwide

Standard methods for estimating obesity may grossly underestimate the burden of overweight worldwide -- on the scale of hundreds of millions -- according to a paper published in Obesity Reviews. Associate professors Daniel Hruschka of Arizona State University's School of Human Evolution and Social Change and Craig Hadley of Emory University's Department of Anthropology are developing more accurate tools by taking a closer look at the different ways that people's bodies are built in different places around the world.

Obesity Reviews

– Arizona State University (ASU)

Link Between Stress Hormone and Obesity in Depressed and Bipolar Patients

Low levels of the stress hormone cortisol are linked to obesity, high levels of fat in the blood and metabolic syndrome among patients with recurrent depressions or bipolar disorder. This according to a study at Umeå University in Sweden published in the Journal of Affective Disorders.

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Journal of Affective Disorders

– Umea University

New Initiative Improves Health Behaviors of Lesbian, Bisexual Women

Lesbian and bisexual women have higher rates of obesity, smoking and stress when compared to their heterosexual counterparts, according to the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services Office on Women’s Health. To address this issue, a University of Missouri researcher has led the first-ever national study to develop healthy weight programs for lesbian and bisexual communities. Ninety-five percent of the study participants achieved the health objectives that are critical for obesity prevention as identified by the Health and Medicine Division of the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering and Medicine.

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– University of Missouri Health

NIBIB-Funded Team Develops a New Way to Image Fat Metabolism

A team from the University of California, Irvine has used a new imaging technique to measure how people break down dietary fat into products the cells of their bodies can use. The technique is a cost effective and convenient way to image this critical process—also called fat metabolism—and provides a way to test interventions aimed at reducing cardiovascular disease, diabetes, and the increased risk of heart attack and stroke that can be caused by metabolic syndrome.

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EB015890; International Journal of Obesity

– National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering

Research: Your Kids Are What You Eat

A team of seven researchers led by the University of Delaware’s Shannon Robson found that parent-child diet quality and calories consumed are related in significant ways. The discovery could lead to better strategies as the nation works to address the growing public health problems of obesity and related conditions such as heart disease, stroke and diabetes.

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– University of Delaware

Home-Based Intervention Aims to Curb Childhood Tooth Decay and Obesity in the Bronx

More than one-third of Bronx residents are born outside of the United States. Often separated from family, challenged by language barriers, unfamiliar with health resources, and burdened by poverty, they are at high risk for health problems. And these risks extend to their young children.

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– Albert Einstein College of Medicine

Norton Healthcare Grants $1.25 Million to University of Louisville for Pediatric Research

Norton Healthcare has awarded grants to six researchers at the University of Louisville to further pediatric research in a variety of areas.

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– University of Louisville

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