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Tuesday, February 5, 2019

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NEWSWISE Food Science Wire with the Institute of Food Technologists (IFT) 05-Feb-2019
 

Food Science Wire with the Institute of Food Technologists (IFT)

Food Science and Nutrition News Channel

...brought to you by Newswise in collaboration with the Institute of Food Technologists (IFT), a nonprofit scientific society bringing together food scientists, technologists and related professions from academia, government, and industry.


Food Science & Production


Rising Temperatures May Safeguard Crop Nutrition as Climate Changes

Hotter temperatures may offset the negative effects of higher carbon dioxide levels on seed quality, according to a two-year soybean field study.

– Donald Danforth Plant Science Center

Plant Journal

Embargo expired on 22-Jan-2019 at 10:00 ET


Front and center: food labels have effects on consumption and product formulation

A new Food-PRICE systematic review and meta-analysis led by researchers at Tufts assessed the effectiveness of food package and menu labeling in interventional studies and found that these approaches can impact consumer and industry behavior for some...

– Tufts University

American Journal of Preventive Medicine

Embargo expired on 17-Dec-2018 at 00:15 ET


What’s behind smelly wine

...

– American Chemical Society (ACS)

Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry

Embargo expired on 12-Dec-2018 at 08:00 ET


University Researchers Discover A New Protein Family, Which is Responsible for Protecting Plants Against Harmful Fungal Diseases

A pioneering study undertaken at the Institute of Evolution has identified a new protein family, which is present in most of the cereal species and is responsible for fighting harmful diseases.

– University of Haifa

Nature Communications


How bacteria build hyper-efficient photosynthesis machines

Researchers facing a future with a larger population and more uncertain climate are looking to photosynthetic bacteria for engineering solutions to improve crop yields. A Canadian research team reports on how bacteria build protein machines to finess...

– American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology (ASBMB)

Journal of Biological Chemistry


Purple Reigns

Purple rice is a whole grain with high levels of antioxidants -- and high levels of genetic diversity, thanks to traditional farming practices, according to new research from Washington University in St. Louis.

– Washington University in St. Louis

Economic Botany


Orchards in natural habitats draw bee diversity, improve apple production

Apple orchards surrounded by agricultural lands are visited by a less diverse collection of bee species than orchards surrounded by natural habitats, according to a new Cornell University-led study.

– Cornell University

Science, Jan-2019


New Complex Carbohydrate Discovered in Barley

University of Adelaide researchers have discovered a new complex carbohydrate in barley. The first of its kind to be discovered in over 30 years, the cereal polysaccharide has potential applications in food, medicine and cosmetics.

– University of Adelaide

ACS Central Science


Super Healthy Kefir Made From Sonicated Milk

A research team at South Ural State University (SUSU) (Chelyabinsk, Russia), in cooperation with their colleagues from the Russian State Agrarian University and the National Institute of Technology Warangal (India), have significantly enhanced the he...

– South Ural State University

Ultrasonics Sonochemistry


Earliest Discovery of Clove and Pepper From Ancient South Asia

A team of archaeologists from UCL have discovered the first empirical evidence of cloves and black pepper to have been found in Sri Lanka, suggesting that exotic spice trade in the region dates back to as early as 600 AD.

– University College London

Antiquity


Can rice filter water from ag fields?

While it’s an important part of our diets, new research shows that rice plants can be used in a different way, too: to clean runoff from farms before it gets into rivers, lakes, and streams.

– American Society of Agronomy (ASA), Crop Science Society of America (CSSA), Soil Science Society of America (SSSA)

Journal of Environmental Quality, September 13, 2018


Wild yeasts may hold key to better wines from warmer climates

Researchers at the University of Adelaide have found yeasts that naturally occur on wine grapes may improve wines produced in warmer climates. Up until now the use of these ‘natural’ or ‘wild’ yeasts during the production process has mostly b...

– University of Adelaide

Scientific Reports


Falafel from Microalgae: Protein for a Hungry World

Graduate students from the Technion recently won first prize in the EIT Food Project Competition for their contribution to the development of a product called “Algalafel.” The novel falafel is enriched with spirulina, an abundant, ecologically fr...

– American Technion Society


Donald Danforth Plant Science Center Co-Hosts Gene Editing Symposium

The Donald Danforth Plant Science Center, in partnership with other local St. Louis business and organizations, hosted a gene editing symposium to explore how cutting-edge gene editing technology will improve human health, grow the food we need with ...

– Donald Danforth Plant Science Center


Experienced Agricultural Engineer Joins UF Indian River Region Scientists to Restore Grapefruit Industry

Sandra Guzmán will lead the center’s irrigation and hydrology program.

– University of Florida Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences


Cage-free unit added to Mississippi State poultry department

A new poultry research facility at Mississippi State University is addressing the growing consumer and corporate demands for cage-free eggs.

– Mississippi State University


Poison Control Expert Available to Discuss CDC’s Warning Against Eating Raw Cookie Dough

A Rutgers University poison control expert is available to discuss the Center for Disease Control and Prevention’s warning about the dangers of tasting raw cookie dough.

Expert Available

– Rutgers University-New Brunswick


Registration Now Open for IFT19: Feed Your Future

Registration is now open for IFT19: Feed Your Future in New Orleans, LA from June 2-5, 2019 at the Ernest N. Morial Convention Center. Hosted by the Institute of Food Technologists (IFT), IFT19 will bring together science of food professionals from a...

– Institute of Food Technologists (IFT)

IFT19: Feed Your Future


ACI Welcomes New FDA Rulemaking for Food Handler Antiseptic Products

The American Cleaning Institute (ACI) welcomed a proposal by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) to create a separate regulatory category for antiseptic products used in food handler settings.

– American Cleaning Institute


Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics Honors Minnesota Rep. Betty McCollum with Public Policy Leadership Award

The Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics recently honored U.S. Rep. Betty McCollum (Minn.) with its 2018 Public Policy Leadership Award for her work in nutrition, food and agriculture policy.

– Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics


Institute of Food Technologists and Australian Institute of Food Science and Technology Announce Joint Membership Offer

The Institute of Food Technologists (IFT) and the Australian Institute of Food Science and Technology (AIFST) today announced that the two organizations will offer a joint membership, combining benefits from both organizations to provide enhanced res...

– Institute of Food Technologists (IFT)


Rutgers Medical Expert Available to Comment on EAT-Lancet Commission Report on Plant-Based Diet and Sustainable Farming

– Rutgers University-New Brunswick


Obesity, Nutrition, & Public Policy


Higher Fruit and Vegetable Consumption Linked to Lower Risk of Early Death for Dialysis Patients

• Among kidney failure patients on hemodialysis, those who consumed higher amounts of fruits and vegetables had lower risks for dying prematurely—both from cardiovascular and non-cardiovascular causes.

– American Society of Nephrology (ASN)

Clinical Journal of the American Society of Nephrology(CJASN)

Embargo expired on 31-Jan-2019 at 17:00 ET


Lower-carbon diets aren't just good for the planet, they're also healthier

A new study examining the carbon footprint of what more than 16,000 Americans eat in a day has good news for environmentally conscious consumers: diets that are more climate-friendly are also healthier.

– University of Michigan

American Journal of Clinical Nutrition

Embargo expired on 24-Jan-2019 at 06:00 ET


Study: Lower-Carbon Diets Aren’t Just Good for the Planet, They’re Also Healthier

Researchers examined the daily diets of more than 16,000 people to compare the climate impact and nutritional value of what America eats in a day. They found that diets that were more climate-friendly were also healthier.

– Tulane University

American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, Jan. 24, 2019

Embargo expired on 24-Jan-2019 at 06:00 ET


Dry-cured ham bones –– a source of heart-healthy peptides?

Drinking bone broth is a recent diet fad that proponents claim fights inflammation, eases joint pain and promotes gut health. Simmering animal bones in water releases collagen and other proteins into the broth that may have health benefits, although ...

– American Chemical Society (ACS)

Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry

Embargo expired on 16-Jan-2019 at 08:00 ET


Study: Excessive Body Fat Around the Middle Linked to Smaller Brain Size

Carrying extra body fat, especially around the middle, may be linked to brain shrinkage, according to a study published in the January 9, 2019, online issue of Neurology®, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. For the study, rese...

– American Academy of Neurology (AAN)

American Academy of Neurology.

Embargo expired on 09-Jan-2019 at 16:00 ET


One in 10 Adults in U.S. Has Food Allergy, but Nearly One in Five Think They Do

Adults think they have food allergies whey they don't

– Ann and Robert H. Lurie Children's Hospital of Chicago

JAMA Network Open

Embargo expired on 04-Jan-2019 at 00:00 ET


Sugar-Sweetened Beverage Pattern Linked to Higher Kidney Disease Risk

• In a study of African-American men and women with normal kidney function, a pattern of higher collective consumption of soda, sweetened fruit drinks, and water was associated with a higher risk of developing kidney disease.

– American Society of Nephrology (ASN)

Clinical Journal of the American Society of Nephrology (CJASN)

Embargo expired on 27-Dec-2018 at 17:00 ET


Large Restaurant Portions a Global Problem, Study Finds

A multi-country study finds that large portion sizes in fast food and full service restaurants is not a problem unique to the U.S. The researchers found that 94 percent of full service meals and 72 percent of fast food meals studied in five countries...

– Tufts University

BMJ 2018;363:k4864

Embargo expired on 12-Dec-2018 at 18:30 ET


Yes Please to Yogurt and Cheese: The New Improved Mediterranean Diet

Thousands of people can take heart as new research from the University of South Australia shows a dairy-enhanced Mediterranean diet will significantly increase health outcomes for those at risk of cardiovascular disease – and it’s even more effec...

– University of South Australia

The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition

Embargo expired on 12-Dec-2018 at 00:00 ET


Studies Reveal Role of Red Meat in Gut Bacteria, Heart Disease Development

CLEVELAND: In concurrent studies, Cleveland Clinic researchers have uncovered new mechanisms that demonstrate why and how regularly eating red meat can increase the risk of heart disease, and the role gut bacteria play in that process. The resear...

– Cleveland Clinic

European Heart Journal; Journal of Clinical Investigation

Embargo expired on 10-Dec-2018 at 16:00 ET


Vitamin C May Reduce Harm to Infants’ Lungs Caused by Smoking During Pregnancy;

Vitamin C may reduce the harm done to lungs in infants born to mothers who smoke during their pregnancy, according to a randomized, controlled trial published online in the American Thoracic Society’s American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Ca...

– American Thoracic Society (ATS)

American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine

Embargo expired on 07-Dec-2018 at 00:15 ET


Poor Sleep, Missed Meals, Less Physical Activity, and Stress in Hospitals May Be Linked to Readmission

Patients who experience disturbances in sleep, mobility, nutrition or mood while admitted in hospital may be more likely to be readmitted within 30 days after discharge, finds a new study co-led by St. Michael’s Hospital and the University Health N...

– University Health Network (UHN)

JAMA Internal Medicine

Embargo expired on 03-Dec-2018 at 11:00 ET


Calorie Restriction Prevents Asthma Symptoms Linked to Inflammation In Mice

Experimenting with mice, Johns Hopkins Medicine researchers report that a low-calorie diet prevented asthma symptoms regardless of the diet’s fat and sugar content. The researchers also say they found that obesity resulting from a high-calorie diet...

– Johns Hopkins Medicine

Scientific Reports ; P50 ES018176, R01 HL128970, HL133100 and HL138932


Human Milk Is a 'Life-Saving Intervention' for Infants with Congenital Heart Disease

With a lower risk of serious complications and improved feeding and growth outcomes, human milk is strongly preferred as the best diet for infants with congenital heart disease (CHD), according to a research review in Advances in Neonatal Care, offic...

– Wolters Kluwer Health: Lippincott Williams and Wilkins

Advances in Neonatal Care


New study shows how vegans, vegetarians and omnivores feel about eating insects

Many non-vegan vegetarians and omnivores are open to including insects in their diet. For vegans, however, that is not an option, a new study from the University of Eastern Finland shows.

– University of Eastern Finland

Nutrients


Cassava High In Iron and Zinc Could Improve Diets and Health In West Africa

A new study led by Danforth Center principal investigator Nigel Taylor and research scientist Narayanan Narayanan, shows that field-grown cassava plants overexpressing a combination of plant genes can accumulate significantly higher concentrations of...

– Donald Danforth Plant Science Center

Nature Biotechnology


Not all saturated fats are equal when it comes to heart health

The type of saturated fats we eat can affect our risk of a heart attack, according to a study published in the International Journal of Cardiology. People whose diets contain relatively little palmitic and stearic acid - saturated fats composed of 16...

– Elsevier

International Journal of Cardiology


Zinc Deficiency May Play a Role in High Blood Pressure

Lower-than-normal zinc levels may contribute to high blood pressure (hypertension) by altering the way the kidneys handle sodium. The study is published ahead of print in the American Journal of Physiology—Renal Physiology.

– American Physiological Society (APS)

American Journal of Physiology—Renal Physiology.


Research shows intermittent fasting provides health benefits

time-restricted feeding (TRF) and has been shown to provide potential benefits cardiometabolic health including improvements in body composition, reduces inflammation and improvements in blood lipids.

– Texas State University


Computer program aids food safety experts with pathogen testing

Cornell University scientists have developed a computer program, Environmental Monitoring With an Agent-Based Model of Listeria (EnABLe), to simulate the most likely locations in a processing facility where the deadly food-borne pathogen Listeria mon...

– Cornell University

Nature Scientific Reports, Jan-2018


Widely available food in US workplaces: Perk or hazard?

Philadelphia, January 22, 2019 - Nearly a quarter of employed adults obtain foods and beverages at work at least once a week, according to a new study from the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and published in the Journal of the Ac...

– Elsevier

Journal of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics


Study Shows Low-Sugar Diet Effective in Boys with Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease

Researchers at University of California San Diego School of Medicine found that a diet low in free sugars (those added to foods and beverages and occurring naturally in fruit juices) resulted in significant improvement in nonalcoholic fatty liver dis...

– University of California San Diego Health

JAMA


Widely available food in US workplaces: Perk or hazard?

Philadelphia, January 22, 2019 - Nearly a quarter of employed adults obtain foods and beverages at work at least once a week, according to a new study from the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and published in the Journal of the Ac...

– Elsevier

Journal of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics


EAT-Lancet Report’s Recommendations Are Achievable if Nutrition Education Is Included, Says Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics

...

– Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics

EAT–Lancet


Soft Drinks + Hard Work + Hot Weather = Possible Kidney Disease Risk

New research suggests that drinking sugary, caffeinated soft drinks while exercising in hot weather may increase the risk of kidney disease. The study is published ahead of print in the American Journal of Physiology—Regulatory, Integrative and Com...

– American Physiological Society (APS)

American Journal of Physiology—Regulatory, Integrative and Comparative Physiology


Can Drinking Oolong Tea Help Prevent Breast Cancer?

SLU scientists and their colleagues have found that oolong tea can damage breast cancer cells and inhibit the growth and progression of tumors in the lab, potentially offering a non-toxic strategy to prevent breast cancer.

– Saint Louis University Medical Center

Anticancer Research


Tap or bottled? Water composition impacts health benefits of tea

Here’s to sipping a cupful of health: Green tea steeped in bottled water has a more bitter taste, but it has more antioxidants than tea brewed using tap water, according to new Cornell University food science research published in Nutrients.

– Cornell University

Nutrients, Jan-2019


Study shows vitamin D supplements are of no benefit to the over 70s

There is little benefit for those over 70 taking higher dose vitamin D supplements to improve their bone strength and reduce the risk of falls, new research has revealed.

– Newcastle University

American Journal of Clinical Nutrition


UCI-led study reveals how fasting can improve overall health and protect against aging-associated diseases

In a University of California, Irvine-led study, researchers found evidence that fasting affects circadian clocks in the liver and skeletal muscle, causing them to rewire their metabolism, which can ultimately lead to improved health and protection a...

– University of California, Irvine

Cell Reports, Dec-2018


Metabolite produced by gut microbiota from pomegranates reduces inflammatory bowel disease

LOUISVILLE, Ky. - Scientists at the University of Louisville have shown that a microbial metabolite, Urolithin A, derived from a compound found in berries and pomegranates, can reduce and protect against inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Millions of ...

– University of Louisville

Nature Communications


Technique boosts omega 3 fatty acid levels in brain

Getting enough of the omega 3 fatty acids DHA and EPA into the brain to study their effects on conditions such as Alzheimer’s and depression — which they have been shown to help — is no easy task. While supplements containing these fatty acids ...

– University of Illinois at Chicago

Journal of Lipid Research


U.S. dietary guidelines shouldn't ignore climate change

The Society for Nutrition Education and Behavior issued a policy statement calling for federal nutrition guidelines to include information about how food choices affect the planet and long-term sustainability of the food system.

– Tulane University

Journal of Nutrition Education and Behavior Jan-2019


Stuck on the couch? Good exercise habits derailed by common food additive

Inorganic phosphate, a food additive and preservative used in up to 70 percent of food in the American diet, may be contributing to couch potato behavior.

– UT Southwestern Medical Center

Circulation


UW study: Long-term breastfeeding sheds light on whether an infant becomes right- or left-handed

Bottle feeding infants is associated with left-handedness, according to a new study from the University of Washington. The study found that the prevalence of left-handedness is lower among breastfed infants as compared to bottle-fed infants. This fi...

– University of Washington

Laterality: Asymmetries of Body, Brain and Cognition


Intermittent Fasting Could Improve Obese Women’s Health

Research carried out at the University of Adelaide shows that obese women lost more weight and improved their health by fasting intermittently while following a strictly controlled diet.

– University of Adelaide

Obesity


Eating your veggies, even in space

Fresh food is so attractive to astronauts that they toasted with salad when they were able to cultivate a few lettuce heads on the International Space Station three years ago.

– Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU)

Life


Could this widely used food additive cause celiac disease?

Myths about gluten are hard to bust. Intolerance, allergy, sensitivity, hypersensitivity. What is what? Celiac disease is none of these things. It is an autoimmune disorder, where gluten triggers the immune system to attack the gut. It is common, li...

– Frontiers

Frontiers in Pediatrics


Research reveals overweight dogs may live shorter lives

New research from the University of Liverpool and Mars Petcare's WALTHAM Centre for Pet Nutrition reveals overweight dogs are more likely to have shorter lives than those at ideal body weights.

– University of Liverpool

Journal of Veterinary Internal Medicine


Dietetics major helps improve college wellness programming

Analysis of students' insight and suggestions regarding how to encourage their peers to develop healthy lifestyle, including stress management, is helping improve college wellness programming.

– South Dakota State University


New research shows how a diet high in fat and cholesterol can lead to life-threatening liver disease

A new USC study provides new insight on how dietary fat and cholesterol drive the development of non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH), a serious form of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease

– Keck Medicine of USC

Hepatology, December 2018


Pensando nas resoluções de ano novo? Especialista da Mayo Clinic dá dicas para maior longevidade

Com a chegada do ano novo, várias pessoas incluem metas de condicionamento físico e aumento do bem-estar em suas resoluções. Agora, pesquisadores estão descobrindo que essas melhorias podem prolongar a vida.

– Mayo Clinic

Mayo Clinic Proceedings, Robert Pignolo, M.D., Ph.D.,


Malnutrition Common in Children with Crohn’s Disease Increases Risk For Post-Operative Complications

Results of a medical records study of children with Crohn’s disease by Johns Hopkins researchers have added substantial evidence for a strong and direct link between malnutrition and increased risk of surgical complications and poor outcomes.

– Johns Hopkins Medicine

Journal of Pediatric Surgery; 5T32CA126607, 2T32DK007713-21


Study shows magnesium optimizes vitamin D status

A randomized trial by Vanderbilt-Ingram Cancer Center researchers indicates that magnesium optimizes vitamin D status, raising it in people with deficient levels and lowering it in people with high levels.

– Vanderbilt University Medical Center

The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition


Gut hormone increases response to food

The holiday season is a hard one for anyone watching their weight. The sights and smells of food are hard to resist. One factor in this hunger response is a hormone found in the stomach that makes us more vulnerable to tasty food smells, encouraging ...

– McGill University

Cell Reports


Anti-GMO sentiment has repercussions for developing world

Anti-GMO sentiment may be holding back the progress of farmers in some African countries, but an Iowa State University agronomist hopes a new study upholding the safety of Bt corn may help policymakers in Africa implement the technology to fight an e...

– Iowa State University

Global Food Security Volume 19, December 2018, Pages 84-91


Trying to get people to agree? Skip the French restaurant and go out for Chinese food

When people in a business negotiation share not just a meal but a plate, they collaborate better and reach deals faster, according to new research from the University of Chicago Booth School of Business.

– University of Chicago Booth School of Business

Psychological Science


Fighting obesity – could it be as plain as dirt?

It costs the global economy an estimated US$2 trillion annually and has been dubbed a modern day health epidemic, but new research from the University of South Australia has unearthed a possible cure for obesity – and it is as plain as dirt!

– University of South Australia

Pharmaceutical Research


High Lead Levels Found in Some Spices Purchased Abroad

Investigations of lead poisoning cases in New York City (NYC) have found high levels of lead in certain spices purchased abroad, reports a study in the Journal of Public Health Management and Practice, part of a special supplement devoted to Lead Poi...

– Wolters Kluwer Health: Lippincott Williams and Wilkins

Journal of Public Health Management and Practice


BIDMC's Research & Health News Digest - January 2019 Edition

A monthly roundup of research briefs showcasing recent scientific advances led by Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center faculty.

– Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center


Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease in children

Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease, excess buildup of fat in the liver (specifically in people who don’t regularly drink or abuse alcohol), doesn’t only affect adults. It happens to be the leading cause of chronic liver disease in children.

– LifeBridge Health


Widely available food in US workplaces: Perk or hazard?

Philadelphia, January 22, 2019 – Nearly a quarter of employed adults obtain foods and beverages at work at least once a week, according to a new study from the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and published in the Journal of the ...

– Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics

Journal of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics


Keys to Intra-Workout Nutrition

Intra-workout nutrition doesn’t only apply to what you’re putting into your body while you are exercising. Rather, it encompasses what you eat or drink before, during and after a workout.

– LifeBridge Health


We Don’t Diet: We Lose Weight!

The South Bronx is notorious for its high obesity and diabetes rates---the highest in New York State. But a group of community health educators, is fighting this trend with new success. Peer leaders are helping other diabetics in the South Bronx neig...

– Health People


A New Year, a New You: RDNs Share Their Top Health Tips

CHICAGO –Many people view the start of a new year as an opportunity to accomplish big goals: losing 20 pounds, running a marathon or hitting the gym every day at dawn. Such lofty goals, especially without a game plan on how to accomplish them, ofte...

– Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics


Academy for Eating Disorders and the Eating Disorders Coalition Partner to Submit Joint Comments to the NIH’s Strategic Plan for Nutrition Research

Call to include Eating Disorders in the NIH Nutrition Research Task Force Strategic Plan

– Academy for Eating Disorders (AED)


UTHealth experts spill beans on festive party food preferences

With the holiday party season in full swing, deciding what to wear can be the biggest headache. But paying attention to what you eat at such occasions might reveal it’s your diet more in need of a makeover. The good news is experts at The Universit...

– University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston


Revolutionary testing for food-supply safety and illicit drug use

Oregon State University College of Engineering researchers are developing novel lab-on-a-chip biosensors for testing food quality and safety as well as illicit drug use.

– Oregon State University, College of Engineering


Alternative Food Culture Now Mainstream

Remember when being a vegetarian or vegan was considered radical? It’s now thought quite ordinary, according to a new book co-edited by QUT and University of Adelaide food researchers.

– University of Adelaide

Alternative Food Politics: From the Margins to the Mainstream


Fad Diets: A Dietitian’s Perspective

Danelle Olson, RD, LDN, CNSC, a registered dietitian in the Weight Loss Surgery Center at BIDMC, explains the problems with fad diets.

Expert Available

– Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center


Stop smoking without packing on the pounds

Smoking is a hard habit to kick but when you do, the health benefits are almost immediate. As you re-invent yourself as a non-smoker, here are three straightforward ways to combat weight gain and keep you distracted while coming off that smoking habi...

Expert Available

– Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center


Whole30-style diets: The good, the bad and the healthy

Restrictive, whole-foods diets like Whole30 are popular choices for those looking to reset their food choices, especially as New Year’s resolutions. It’s important, though, to recognize that highly restrictive diets can have more risks than benef...

Expert Available

– Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center


Stay in shape with the 12 Days of Fitmas

For many, the holiday season is a time of overeating, but a Houston Methodist personal trainer says this year you can beat the battle of the bulge by using the classic tune “The 12 Days of Christmas.”

Expert Available

– Houston Methodist


Just How Healthy is Chicken Noodle Soup?

You may remember a loved one making you a bowl of chicken noodle soup whenever you were feeling under the weather as a child. Just how healthy is this culinary cure-all? BIDMC clinical dietitian Sandy Allonen, RD, weighs in.

Expert Available

– Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center


USDA’s Proposed Rule Offers Flexibility: Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics Encourages Schools to Stay on Course

School nutrition programs will have more flexibility in areas related to serving flavored milk and whole grains under a final rule released this week by the U.S. Department of Agriculture. The rule also allows more time for schools to reach sodium re...

– Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics


During National Nutrition Month® 2019, Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics Promotes Healthful Eating, Physical Activity

Choosing nutritious foods and getting enough physical activity can make a real difference in your health. For National Nutrition Month® 2019, in March, the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics encourages people to make informed food choices and develo...

– Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics


UTHealth drives forward programs to stop childhood obesity

Two grants totaling nearly $3.7 million will support the efforts of The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston (UTHealth) to combat obesity and help Texas children achieve healthy lifestyles through the mission of the Michael & Susan De...

– University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston

R01HD097669; 000084100001


Mount Sinai Health System and Epicured Partner to Bring Culinary Cures to Patients

Third-Round Investment by Mount Sinai Ventures in Online Meal Delivery Service Start-Up Heralds the Growing Benefits of “Food as Medicine”

– Mount Sinai Health System


Rush’s MIND Diet Again Ranked Among Best

For the fourth consecutive year, a diet created, studied and reported on by researchers at Rush University Medical Center has been ranked among the top five diets in multiple categories by U.S. News & World Report in its annual “Best Diets” list....

– Rush University Medical Center


UNLV Startup Uses Genes to Create Personalized Diets

Food Genes and Me is a site and software that lets users figure out health risks and how to solve them within minutes.

– University of Nevada, Las Vegas (UNLV)


Big fat lies about obesity: ASU professor says health risks of obesity have been exaggerated

– Arizona State University (ASU)


Science Says the DASH Diet Works

– Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center


How Safe Is the Keto Diet?

– University of Alabama at Birmingham


Expert: The food you eat has a big effect on your mood

– Binghamton University, State University of New York


Rutgers Medical Expert Available to Discuss How New Jersey’s New Breast Milk Law Improves Infant Health and Can Reduce SIDS

– Rutgers University-New Brunswick

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