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Monday, July 22, 2019

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Newswise Obesity News Source 22-Jul-2019
 

See More Obesity News in the Newswise Obesity News Source



August is Kids Eat Right Month™

August is Kids Eat Right Month™, when the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics and its Foundation focus on the importance of healthful eating and active lifestyles for children and their families.

– Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics


Intermittent Fasting May Improve Blood Sugar Even without Weight Loss

New research suggests that intermittent fasting—cycling through periods of normal eating and fasting—may regulate blood sugar (glucose) levels even when accompanied by little-to-no weight loss. The study is published ahead of print in the America...

– American Physiological Society (APS)

American Journal of Physiology—Regulatory, Integrative and Comparative Physiology


Is Sweetness Your Weakness? A Dietitian’s Guide to Giving Up Sugar

How does the body react when you nix sugar from your diet? UNLV nutritionist Samantha Coogan shares a solution for withdrawal symptoms, and what to expect when they’re over.

Expert Available

– University of Nevada, Las Vegas (UNLV)


Early and Ongoing Experiences of Weight Stigma Linked to Self-Directed Weight Shaming

Researchers at Penn Medicine surveyed more than 18,000 adults enrolled in a commercial weight management program, and found that participants who internalized weight bias the most tended to be younger, female, have a higher body mass index, and have ...

– Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania

Obesity Science and Practice


Eating a bit less reduces heart attack risk, study shows

The link between obesity and cardiovascular disease is well-known but in what is believed to be the first study of its kind, an international team has found even restricting calorie intake moderately, by people only marginally overweight, can signifi...

– University of Sydney

Lancet Diabetes & Endocrinology


Seeing greenery linked to less intense and frequent cravings

Being able to see green spaces from your home is associated with reduced cravings for alcohol, cigarettes and harmful foods, new research has shown.

– University of Plymouth

Health & Place


New UChicago Medicine report outlines top health priorities for South Side communities

UChicago Medicine's 2019 Community Health Needs Assessment emphasizes diabetes, asthma and trauma resiliency, as well as importance of addressing underlying contributors to health concerns and chronic disease

– University of Chicago Medical Center


MBSAQIP manual presents updated program standards for overweight and obese patients

Third version of nationally recognized standards manual includes a designation for bariatric and metabolic surgery centers to now offer patients non-surgical interventions along with a quality improvement project requirement.

– American College of Surgeons (ACS)


Maternal Obesity Linked to Childhood Cancer

New study analyzed 2 million birth records and 3,000 cancer registry records and found that children born to obese mothers were 57% more likely to develop cancer, independent of other factors. This finding offers a rare opportunity for childhood canc...

– Health Sciences at the University of Pittsburgh

American Journal of Epidemiology; T32CA186873


Researchers awarded grant to study obesity in children with spina bifida

Health providers would like to give better diet guidelines to parents of children with spina bifida but exact measurements of the children's body composition are hard to obtain. This group aims develop an easy method of gathering body fat informatio...

– University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee

NIH/NICHD R01HD096085


Augustana University Professor’s Research Leads to Surprising Mating Decision in Butterfly Species

The males of one species of butterfly are more attracted to females that are active, not necessarily what they look like, according to a recent research conducted at Augustana University.The paper, “Behaviour before beauty: Signal weighting during ...

– Augustana University, South Dakota

Ethology, August 2019


Ignoring cues for alcohol and fast food is hard -- but is it out of our control?

Have you ever tried to stay away from fast food, but found hard-to-ignore signals that represent its availability - like neon lights and ads - are everywhere?

– University of New South Wales

Psychological Science


Obesity during Pregnancy May Impair Offspring’s Lung Health

Obesity during pregnancy may negatively affect children’s lung development, according to new research. The study, published ahead of print in the American Journal of Physiology—Lung Cellular and Molecular Physiology, was chosen as an APSselect ar...

– American Physiological Society (APS)

American Journal of Physiology—Lung Cellular and Molecular Physiology


Older Adults Benefit from Community Food and Nutrition Programs

Older adults benefit from participating in community-based food and nutrition programs that enable them to remain healthy and independent, according to an updated position paper by the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics and the Society for Nutrition ...

– Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics

Journal of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics

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