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Thursday, March 12, 2020

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Climate and the Environment News from Newswise 12-Mar-2020
 

Climate Change and Environmental News and Experts for the Media

Newswise provides experts for the media on hurricanes, wildfires, and other natural disasters, as well as the latest research in Environmental Science and Climate Science.


Research


Remote South American kelp forests surveyed for first time since 1973

In the kelp forests of Tierra del Fuego, at the southernmost tip of South America, the relative abundance of kelp, sea urchins, and sea stars has not changed significantly since 1973.

– PLOS

PLOS ONE

Embargo expired on 11-Mar-2020 at 14:00 ET


Researchers Predict Potential Spread and Seasonality for COVID-19 Based on Climate Where Virus Appears to Thrive

Researchers at the University of Maryland School of Medicine’s Institute of Human Virology (IHV), which is part of the Global Virus Network (GVN), predict that COVID-19 will follow a seasonal pattern similar to other respiratory viruses like season...

– University of Maryland Medical Center

SSRN


Climate Change Could Threaten Sea Snails in Mid-Atlantic Waters

Climate change could threaten the survival and development of common whelk – a type of sea snail – in the mid-Atlantic region, according to a study led by scientists at Rutgers University–New Brunswick. The common, or waved, whelk (Buccinum und...

– Rutgers University-New Brunswick

Helgoland Marine Research


Microbes play important role in soil’s nitrogen cycle

But different microbes have distinct roles to play, and environmental factors influence activity.

– American Society of Agronomy (ASA), Crop Science Society of America (CSSA), Soil Science Society of America (SSSA)

Soil Science Society of America Journal


Crocs' better parenting skills could make them more resilient to climate change

The ability of crocodiles to survive mass extinctions could be in part due to their more hands-on approach to parenting, say scientists at the University of Bath's Milner Centre for Evolution.

– University of Bath

Biological Journal of the Linnean Society


Bumblebees aversion to pumpkin pollen may help plants thrive

Cornell University researchers have found that squash and pumpkin pollen have physical, nutritional and chemical defense qualities that are harmful to bumblebees. The results of their recent study suggest that deterring bumblebees from collecting and...

– Cornell University

Nature Scientific Reports, Feb-2020


Hot Time in the City: Urban Lizards Evolve Heat Tolerance

Faced with a gritty landscape of metal fences, concrete walls and asphalt pavement, city lizards in Puerto Rico rapidly and repeatedly evolved better tolerance for heat than their forest counterparts, according to new research from Washington Univers...

– Washington University in St. Louis

Nature Ecology & Evolution


NUS study reveals positive connection between nature experiences and happiness globally

An AI analysis of photographs posted on social media revealed a positive association between nature and happiness globally

– National University of Singapore

Scientific Reports


Feeding wildlife can disrupt animal social structures

A team of researchers from the University of Georgia and San Diego State University has found that the practice of feeding wildlife could be more detrimental to animals than previously thought.

– University of Georgia

Nature Scientific Reports


Indian Ocean phenomenon spells climate trouble for Australia

New international research by Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI) and colleagues has found a marked change in the Indian Ocean’s surface temperatures that puts southeast Australia on course for increasingly hot and dry conditions.

– Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution

Nature


Climate shifts prompt shrubs and trees to take root in open areas

Wild, treeless landscapes are becoming more wooded as climate change leads to warming temperatures and wetter weather, research suggests.

– University of Edinburgh

Global Ecology and Biogeography


From climate change awareness to action

New research on how people’s worldviews affect their perceptions and actions could help policymakers and activists reframe the discussion around climate change mitigation.

– International Institute for Applied Systems Analysis

Energy & Environment


Rain, more than wind, led to massive toppling of trees in Hurricane Maria, says study

A new study says that hurricanes Irma and Maria combined in 2017 to knock down a quarter of the biomass contained in Puerto Rico's trees -- and that massive rainfall, more than wind, was a previously unsuspected key factor.

– Earth Institute at Columbia University

Scientific Reports


Climate change at Mount Rainier expected to increase ‘mismatch’ between visitors and iconic wildflowers

The wildflowers of Mount Rainier’s subalpine meadows, which bloom once the snowpack melts and are a major tourist draw, will melt months earlier by the end of this century due to climate change. New research shows that, under those conditions, many...

– University of Washington

Frontiers in Ecology and the Environment


How new data can make ecological forecasts as good as weather forecasts

Soon, University of Wisconsin–Madison ecologist Ben Zuckerberg thinks we’ll be able to pull off the same forecasting feat for bird migrations and wildlife populations as for climate forecasts. That’s because just as those recurring changes in c...

– University of Wisconsin-Madison

Trends in Ecology and Evolution March 5, 2020


New test measures corn nitrogen needs with greater accuracy

A recently published study analyzed a combination of soil tests to gauge corn nitrogen needs more accurately than the standard chemical tests that have been in use for roughly 50 years. The research could result in economic benefits to farmers and im...

– Iowa State University

Agronomy Journal


Endangered species on supermarket shelves

Imagine purchasing products from your local grocer, only to find out that those products are comprised of critically endangered species.

– University of Hong Kong

Science Advances


How communication about environmental issues can bridge the political divide

A relatively new theory that identifies universal concerns underlying human judgment could be key to helping people with opposing views on an issue coax each other to a different way of thinking, new research suggests.

– Ohio State University

Journal of Environmental Psychology


NASA satellite offers urban carbon dioxide insights

Using data from NASA's Orbiting Carbon Observatory-2, researchers found connections between the population density of cities and how much carbon dioxide they produce per person.

– University of Utah

Environmental Research Letters


Tropical forests' carbon sink is already rapidly weakening

The ability of the world's tropical forests to remove carbon from the atmosphere is decreasing, according to a study tracking 300,000 trees over 30 years, published today in Nature.

– University of Leeds

Nature


Beneath the Ice: FSU researchers find newly uncovered Arctic landscape plays important role in carbon cycle

As the ice sheet covering most of Greenland retreats, Florida State University researchers are studying the newly revealed landscape to understand its role in the carbon cycle.

– Florida State University

Limnology and Oceanography


Congenital Heart Disease and Climate Change

With global temperatures on the rise, medical investigators are taking a deeper look at the potential link between climate change and the rise of congenital heart disease-the most common birth defect, affecting some 40,000 children born every year in...

– Cedars-Sinai

Journal of the American Heart Association


A hunger fighter empowers farmers with NextGen Cassava

Alfred Ozimati is breeding the latest in disease-resistant cassava that meets the needs of subsistence farmers, thanks to the NextGen Cassava project run by Cornell University.

– Cornell University


Features


What Are Green Jobs?

Green jobs are booming. But what are they? And how can the United States prepare for the future this shift in technologies will bring? This video is part of the Inside the Issues video series, featuring CFR Vice President of Studies Shannon K. O’N...

– Council on Foreign Relations (CFR)

Shannon K. O'Neil, "What Are Green Jobs?", Election 2020, January 24, 2020.


How does flooding affect farms?

Patience is a virtue for on-farm flood recovery

– American Society of Agronomy (ASA), Crop Science Society of America (CSSA), Soil Science Society of America (SSSA)

Sustainable, Secure Food


MBA Climate Summit: Embracing Opportunities, Mitigating Challenges

Understanding the challenges and opportunities presented by global climate change linked the speakers, presentations and dialogues at ClimateCAP: The Global MBA Summit on Climate, Capital & Business, held 21–22 February at the University of Virgini...

– University of Virginia Darden School of Business


Studying Water’s Flow Will Help Preserve Access to Life-Sustaining Resource

Tens of thousands of reservoir and dam systems are being operated in communities across the United States, ensuring access to reliable sources of water. That access, however, isn’t a guarantee. Altered rainfall patterns driven by global warming, in...

– Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute (RPI)


Sandia, Puerto Rican university collaborate to develop energy projects for global tropics

A new 10-year agreement between Sandia National Laboratories and the University of Puerto Rico, Mayagüez, has the potential to bring more reliable electricity to remote communities and the latest in electrical grid technology to rural areas in the w...

– Sandia National Laboratories


Experts


Researchers provide insight on how our notion of the environment has changed since the inception of Earth Day 50-years ago

– Arizona State University (ASU)


Unpredictable weather patterns requires special care and attention for spring plants and trees, says expert

– Virginia Tech


Announcements


Rice, know thy enemy: NSF grants $2.6M to study weedy invader

Many farmers struggle with an enemy that looks like a friend. Agricultural weeds that are close relatives of crops present a particular challenge to farmers because their physical similarities to the desirable species make them difficult to detect an...

– Washington University in St. Louis

National Science Foundation

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