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Newswise SciWire - Science News for Journalists
Newswise SciWire
Thursday, May 2, 2019

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Science News

02-May-2019


Arsenic-breathing life discovered in the tropical Pacific Ocean

In oxygen-poor parts of the ocean, some microorganisms survive by breathing arsenic. This holdover from the ancient Earth was not thought to still exist in the open ocean.

– University of Washington

Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences


What Drives Multiple Female Acorn Woodpeckers to Share a Nest?

Acorn Woodpeckers live in close-knit family groups and have one of the most complex breeding systems of any bird in the world. In about 20 percent of family groups, up to 3 related females may lay eggs in the same nest. They raise the chicks cooperat...

– Cornell University

The American Naturalist


Exploding Electrical Wires Underwater to Understand Shock Waves

Shock wave studies allow researchers to achieve the warm dense matter that’s found only in the extreme conditions around stars and created in the laboratory for inertial confinement fusion research, and researchers in Israel recently set out to und...

– American Institute of Physics (AIP)

Physics of Plasmas


Bronx River Turtles Get a Check-up

A team of scientists and veterinarians gave a health evaluation of turtles living in the Bronx River, one of the most urbanized rivers in the U.S. and the only remaining freshwater river that flows through New York City.

– Wildlife Conservation Society

Journal of Wildlife Diseases


How Do I Keep More of the Nitrogen in My Soil?

Prevent losses for garden and environmental health

– Soil Science Society of America (SSSA)


Stars and stories: University of Washington astronomer Emily Levesque gathering material for book on 'true tales of observational astronomy'

Emily Levesque, UW assistant professor of astronomy, and an increasingly well-known name in her field, is working on material for a new book for science-loving general readers, to be called "The Last Stargazers: True Tales of the Colorful and Vanishi...

Expert Available

– University of Washington

01-May-2019


Wolves More Prosocial than Pack Dogs in Touchscreen Experiment

Findings support idea that dogs helping pack members is ancestral tendency, and not due to domestication

– PLOS

PLOS ONE

Embargo expired on 01-May-2019 at 14:00 ET


Searching for Lost WWII-Era Uranium Cubes from Germany

In 2013, Timothy Koeth received an extraordinary gift: a heavy metal cube and a crumpled message that read, “Taken from Germany, from the nuclear reactor Hitler tried to build. Gift of Ninninger.” Koeth accepted the cube and its note as an invita...

– American Institute of Physics (AIP)

Physics Today

Embargo expired on 01-May-2019 at 03:00 ET


The GPS of Neurons Now Better Understood with an Study Published in Neuron

Researchers demonstrated the role that plays the Boc receptor in the the formation of the nervous system. This breakthrough could, for example, contribute to the creation of tools in regenerative medicine to reconstitute nervous circuits, which woul...

– Universite de Montreal

Neuron, May 7, 2019; the W. Garfield Weston Foundation; Brain Canada Foundation; Canada Foundation for Innovation; Canada Research Chairs Program; Fonds de recherche du Quebec – Sante...

Embargo expired on 01-May-2019 at 11:00 ET


As Monarch Butterflies Migrate Northward, Experts Ask Iowans to Keep Habitat in Mind

A sizable population of monarch butterflies is fluttering toward Iowa this spring. What can Iowans do to put the species on a more sustainable footing after years of declines? An Iowa State University expert discusses best practices for monarch conse...

– Iowa State University

Embargo expired on 01-May-2019 at 09:00 ET


‘Exotic’ genes may improve cotton yield and quality

Improving cotton quality can have ramifications for $12B U.S. cotton trade industry

– American Society of Agronomy (ASA), Crop Science Society of America (CSSA), Soil Science Society of America (SSSA)

Crop Science


Novel nanoparticle enhances radiation tumor killing

NIBIB researchers have designed a nanoparticle that generates radiation-induced oxygen free radicals in the low-oxygen center of tumors, dramatically increasing tumor destruction.

– National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering

Nat Comm, March-2019


The sicker the better

A common woodland beetle that plays an important role in the decomposition of fallen trees may be getting a boost from a surprising source: parasites.

– University of Georgia

Biology Letters


Human influence on global droughts dates back 100 years

Observations and climate reconstructions using data from tree rings confirm that human activity was affecting the worldwide drought risk as far back as the early 20th century.

– Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

Nature, May 1


Is Captain America Obese? New Study Highlights Exaggerated Physical Differences Between Male and Female Superheroes

Superheroes like Thor and Black Widow may have what it takes to save the world in movies like Avengers: Endgame, but neither of their comic book depictions has a healthy body mass index (BMI). New research from Binghamton University and SUNY Oswego f...

– Binghamton University, State University of New York

Evolutionary Behavioral Sciences, April-2019

includes video


Chemical records in teeth confirm elusive Alaska lake seals are one of a kind

Lifelong chemical records stored in the canine teeth of an elusive group of harbor seals show that the seals remain in freshwater their entire lives and are likely a distinct population from their relatives in the ocean. Their home territory, Iliamna...

– University of Washington

Conservation Biology, March-2019


AI Could Help Citrus Growers Find, Detect Dangerous Psyllids

Precision agriculture engineer Yiannis Ampatzidis sees a day when citrus farmers use artificial intelligence to detect the pin-sized insects that can infect the fruit’s trees with the deadly greening disease. That day could come in the near future,...

– University of Florida Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences


Story tips from the Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory, May 2019

ORNL story tips: Using ORNL’s Summit supercomputer, scientists created some of the largest virtual universes; plant-based, super-sticky material proves stickier than mussels; method to 3D print big components with metal could promise low-cost, high...

– Oak Ridge National Laboratory

ACS Macro Letters, Oct-2018; Applied Sciences, Feb-2019; Annals of Nuclear Energy, Jan-2019


The ‘Little’ Computer Cluster That Could

A computer cluster, which switched off April 1, had a storied history in serving high-energy physics and nuclear physics experiments.

– Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory


Texas A&M-designed irrigation runoff mitigation system patented, available for licensing

COLLEGE STATION – Just as temperatures begin to heat up and lawns begin to seemingly beg for water, Texas A&M AgriLife faculty were recognized at a patent award banquet for their irrigation runoff mitigation system. With water waste a growing pr...

– Texas A&M AgriLife


Machine ready to see if magic metal – lithium – can help bring the fusion that lights the stars to Earth

Feature describes three-year upgrade of the unique Lithium Tokamak Experiment that brings conditions in the device closer to those in a fusion reactor.

– Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory

30-Apr-2019


New Mathematical Approach Tested for the Search of Flight MH370

The 2014 disappearance of Malaysia Airlines Flight MH370 remains ones of the biggest mysteries in aviation. Recent efforts combining satellite data with a new mathematical approach, analyzing how debris moves around the ocean, aim to make headway in ...

– American Institute of Physics (AIP)

Chaos

Embargo expired on 30-Apr-2019 at 11:00 ET


LLNL scientists combine X-rays and simulations to mitigate defects in metal 3D builds

Combining high performance computer simulations with X-ray imaging of the laser powder bed fusion (LBPF) metal additive manufacturing process obtained with SLAC’s synchrotron, researchers have found a way to negate the formation of pores — tiny h...

– Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

Nature Communications, April 30

Embargo expired on 30-Apr-2019 at 05:05 ET


Is Wikipedia stealing the news?

While the influence of Facebook and Google on the news landscape has been well examined, Wikipedia’s role as a source of breaking news has not received enough attention, says a University of Sydney expert.

– University of Sydney

First Monday

Embargo expired on 30-Apr-2019 at 21:00 ET


Carbon capture technology moves to commercialization

Powerful Mechanical Trees Can Remove CO2 From the Air to Combat Global Warming at Scale

– Arizona State University (ASU)

Embargo expired on 30-Apr-2019 at 07:00 ET


Human Ancestors Were “Grounded,” New Analysis Shows

African apes adapted to living on the ground, a finding that indicates human evolved from an ancestor not limited to tree or other elevated habitats. The analysis adds a new chapter to evolution, shedding additional light on what preceded human biped...

– New York University

eLife


Isle Royale Winter Study: 13 New Wolves, 20 Radio-collared Moose

Michigan Technological University’s 2019 Isle Royale Winter Study focuses on the implications of newly introduced wolves and the movements of newly collared moose.

– Michigan Technological University


Pregnancy shifts the daily schedule forward

Add this to the list of what to expect: Getting up earlier, at least in the first trimester. New research from finds that women and mice both shift their daily schedules earlier by up to a few hours during the first third of their pregnancy. A study ...

– Washington University in St. Louis

Journal of Biological Rhythms, April 24, 2019


URI biologist, colleagues warn of peril from biological invasions as White House proposes to halve funding

KINGSTON, R.I. – April 30, 2019 – As the Trump Administration prepares to cut in half the budget for the National Invasive Species Council, a group of invasive species experts led by a University of Rhode Island professor has issued a warning abo...

– University of Rhode Island

Frontiers in Ecology and the Environment


Pest-killing fungi could protect NYS grapes, apples from invasive insect

Cornell University-led research reports that two local fungal pathogens could potentially curb an invasive insect that has New York vineyard owners on edge.

– Cornell University

PNAS, April-2019


N.C. Study: Warmer Water Linked to Higher Proportion of Male Flounder

In the wild and in the lab, researchers find a relationship between higher water temperatures and a lower percentage of female flounder, a cause for concern.

– North Carolina State University

Scientific Reports


Do You Smell What I Smell?

A new study shows that small changes in a single olfactory receptor gene can affect how strong and pleasant a person finds an odor. The findings expand understanding of how olfactory receptors in the nose encode information about the properties of od...

– Monell Chemical Senses Center

Proceedings of the National Academies of Science


Flowering plants, new teeth and no dinosaurs: New study sheds light on the rise of mammals

A new study published April 30 in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences identified three factors critical in the rise of mammal communities: the rise of flowering plants; the evolution of tribosphenic molars in mammals; and the extincti...

– University of Washington

Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences


Australian Blue tongue lizard ancestor was round-in-the-tooth

Reconstruction of the most complete fossil lizard found in Australia, a 15 million year old relative of our modern bluetongues and social skinks named Egernia gillespieae, reveals the creature was equipped with a robust crushing jaw and was remarkabl...

– Flinders University

Vertebrate Palaeontology

includes video


Berkeley Lab Science Snapshot April 2019

Three science briefs from Berkeley Lab

– Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Climate Dynamics


Journalists: Be our guest at the 2019 ACSM Research Conference

Gain story ideas and learn about cutting-edge science at ACSM's comprehensive sports medicine and exercise science conference that covers the science, practice, public health and policy aspects of sports medicine, exercise science and physical activi...

– American College of Sports Medicine (ACSM)

ACSM 66th Annual Meeting


Argonne’s role in the Versatile Test Reactor Program to provide platform for future nuclear reactor technologies

As a central player in a new collaboration that brings together U.S. Department of Energy national laboratories, General Electric and other commercial organizations and universities, Argonne is working to develop a new advanced nuclear reactor called...

– Argonne National Laboratory


Snapshot: S&T’s Immersive Imaging System's High-Resolution Images & 360-degree Coverage, Provides Full Scene Situational Awareness

S&T’s Immersive Imaging System was recognized at the recent annual R&D 100 Conference among the 100 most exceptional innovations in science and technology from 2018.

– Homeland Security's Science And Technology Directorate

29-Apr-2019


Are coffee farms for the birds? Yes and no.

Şekercioğlu asked whether the expansion of coffee plantations is reducing tropical bird biodiversity. The answer, published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, is no. And yes. Sun coffee plantations are able to host a surprising nu...

– University of Utah

Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Embargo expired on 29-Apr-2019 at 15:00 ET


'Pedigree Is Not Destiny' When It Comes to Scholarly Success

A new analysis of academic productivity finds researchers' current working environments better predict their future success than the prestige of their doctoral training.

– Santa Fe Institute

PNAS

Embargo expired on 29-Apr-2019 at 15:00 ET


Ag Census Reveals First Reports of Kiwiberry Production in the Northeast;

For the first time since the USDA began keeping statistics in 1840, farmers from several Northeast states, including New Hampshire, are reporting kiwifruit production operations. The news comes six years after the New Hampshire Agricultural Experimen...

– University of New Hampshire

2017 Census of Agriculture


Squid Skin Inspires Creation of Next-Generation Space Blanket

Irvine, Calif., April 29, 2019 – Drawing design inspiration from the skin of stealthy sea creatures, engineers at the University of California, Irvine have developed a next-generation, adaptive space blanket that gives users the ability to control ...

– University of California, Irvine

Nature Communications


Black Hole's Tug on Space Pulls Fast-Moving Jets in Rapid Wobble

A spinning black hole pulls in material from a companion star, and its gravitational effect causes ejected jets of material to wobble like a child's spinning top.

– National Radio Astronomy Observatory

Nature


The dead may outnumber the living on Facebook within 50 years

New analysis by academics from the Oxford Internet Institute (OII), part of the University of Oxford

– University of Oxford

Big Data and Society


New technique could pave the way for simple color tuning of LED bulbs

A new technique?the result of an international collaboration of scientists from Lehigh University, West Chester University, Osaka University and the University of Amsterdam?

– Lehigh University

ACS Photonics


Nature Ecology & Evolution publishes MSU study on marine exotic species

An associate director of Mississippi State’s Northern Gulf Institute is receiving international attention for his eye-opening study on the impact exotic species have on native marine communities.

– Mississippi State University

Nature


Plant Cells Eat Their Own ... Membranes and Oil Droplets

Biochemists at Brookhaven National Laboratory have discovered two ways that autophagy, or self-eating, controls the levels of oils in plant cells. The study describes how this cannibalistic-sounding process actually helps plants survive, and suggests...

– Brookhaven National Laboratory

The Plant Cell, April 29, 2019


Patterns of compulsive smartphone use suggest how to kick the habit

UW researchers conducted in-depth interviews to learn why we compulsively check our phones.

– University of Washington

2019 ACM CHI conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems


Biodegradable Bags Can Hold a Full Load of Shopping After 3 Years in the Environment

Biodegradable and compostable plastic bags are still capable of carrying full loads of shopping after being exposed in the natural environment for three years, a new study shows.

– University of Plymouth

Environmental Science & Technology


Glenn Burton: A leader of the 'Green Revolution'

This story is part of a series, called Georgia Groundbreakers, that celebrates innovative and visionary faculty, students, alumni and leaders throughout the history of the University of Georgia—and their profound, enduring impact on our state, our ...

– University of Georgia

SciWire Announcements


2 HMS Faculty elected to National Academy of Sciences

Researchers’ work shows how curiosity, creativity drive science and illustrates how a passion for discovery enriches knowledge

– Harvard Medical School


Unraveling Cannabinoids

Harvard Medical School, MIT receive $9 million to study neurobiology, physiologic effects of cannabinoids

– Harvard Medical School


Johns Hopkins Structural Biologist Among 125 Elected to National Academy of Sciences

Cynthia Wolberger, Ph.D., a structural biologist who unravels how cells use chemical tags to turn genes on and off, is among 125 scientists newly elected to the National Academy of Sciences.

– Johns Hopkins Medicine


UF/IFAS Agricultural Engineering Professor Named Director of Florida Climate Institute

A University of Florida agricultural engineer who uses crop models to help farmers adapt to warmer, more erratic weather, will unite scientists to better deal with the impacts of an increasingly changing climate.

– University of Florida Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences


Students from Minnesota and Massachusetts Win DOE’s 29th National Science Bowl®

Students from Wayzata High School in Plymouth, Minnesota, won the 2019 U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) National Science Bowl® (NSB) today in Washington, D.C. In the middle school competition, students from Jonas Clarke Middle School in Lexington, Ma...

– Department of Energy, Office of Science

SciWire Higher Education Events


Expert Panel to Discuss the Changing Nature of the Science-Policy Interface

California State University, Monterey Bay’s (CSUMB) James W. Rote Distinguished Professorship in Marine Science & Policy program will host a panel of science policy experts to discuss the changing nature of the science-policy interface in our natio...

– California State University, Monterey Bay

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