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Newswise SciWire - Science News for Journalists
Newswise SciWire
Monday, May 6, 2019

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(31 New)
 

Science News

06-May-2019


UNH Researchers Discover New Strain of Canine Distemper in Wild Animals in NH, VT

A distinct strain of canine distemper virus, which is a widespread virus of importance to wildlife and domesticated dogs, has been identified in wild animals in New Hampshire and Vermont, according to pathologists with the New Hampshire Veterinary Di...

– University of New Hampshire

Journal of Veterinary Diagnostic Investigation

Embargo expired on 06-May-2019 at 07:30 ET


Quantum computing with Graphene Plasmons

A novel material that consists of a single sheet of carbon atoms could lead to new designs for optical quantum computers. Physicists from the University of Vienna and the Institute of Photonic Sciences in Barcelona have shown that tailored graphene s...

– University of Vienna

npj Quantum Information

03-May-2019


New Approach for Solving Protein Structures from Tiny Crystals

Scientists have developed a new approach for solving atomic-scale 3-D protein structures from tiny crystals. The advance will open up this structural biology technique to a wide range of hard-to-crystallize proteins in bacteria, viruses, plants, and ...

– Brookhaven National Laboratory

IUCrJ, 3 May 2019


Quantum sensor for photons

Physicist Tracy Northup is currently researching the development of quantum internet at the University of Innsbruck.

– University of Innsbruck

Physical Review Letters


Climate extremes explain 18%-43% of global crop yield variations

Researchers from Australia, Germany and the US have quantified the effect of climate extremes

– University of New South Wales

Environmental Research Letters


Forest fires accelerating snowmelt across western US, study finds

Forest fires are causing snow to melt earlier in the season, a trend occurring across the western U.S. that may affect water supplies and trigger even more fires, according to a new study by a team of researchers at Portland State University (PSU)

– Portland State University

Nature Communications


Industry-ready process makes plastics chemical from plant sugars

In new research, a team from the Great Lakes Bioenergy Research Center and the University of Wisconsin–Madison describe an efficient and economically feasible process for producing HMF, a versatile plant-derived chemical considered crucial for buil...

– University of Wisconsin-Madison

Energy and Environmental Science


Researchers take a bottom-up approach to synthesizing microscopic diamonds for bioimaging, quantum computing

Researchers at the University of Washington, the U.S. Naval Research Laboratory and the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory discovered that they can use extremely high pressure and temperature to introduce other elements into nanodiamonds for appli...

– University of Washington

Science Advances, May 2019


Geosciences Grad Student Tackles Explosive Eruptions in Chile

Aaron Marshall studies mafic magma on Llaima Volcano in Chile

– Boise State University


Reconstructing the Acoustics of Notre Dame

The April 15 fire that devastated the roof of Notre Dame de Paris Cathedral left many people around the globe wondering whether it’s possible to rebuild it in a way that can recreate the cultural icon’s complex signature acoustics. Six years ago...

Expert Available

– Acoustical Society of America (ASA)

02-May-2019


Running May Have Made Dinosaurs’ Wings Flap Before they Evolved to Fly

Before they evolved the ability to fly, two-legged dinosaurs may have begun to flap their wings as a passive effect of running along the ground

– PLOS

PLOS Computational Biology

Embargo expired on 02-May-2019 at 14:00 ET


Large Minnows Are Able to Survive in Heavily Polluted Houston Ship Channel Through Hybridization

Recent hybridization of the Gulf killifish — a large minnow common in the heavily polluted Houston Ship Channel — has enabled the species to adapt rapidly to extreme pollution, a Baylor University study has found.

– Baylor University

Science

Embargo expired on 02-May-2019 at 14:00 ET


Study suggests earthquakes are triggered well beyond fluid injection zones

Researchers discovered that the practice of subsurface fluid injection often used in oil and gas exploration could cause significant, rapidly spreading earthquake activity beyond the fluid diffusion zone. The results account for the observation that ...

– Tufts University

AAAS Science (Apr-2019)364:6439; G17AP00016; EAR-1653382; EAR-1033462; G12AC20038; 07-PCO2-0001; 13-JS-06-0004-01

Embargo expired on 02-May-2019 at 14:00 ET


For Giant Pandas, Bamboo Is Vegetarian ‘Meat’

New research using an approach called nutritional geometry sheds light on giant panda evolution, and their unusual transition from carnivorous ancestry to extreme specialised herbivory.

– University of Sydney

Embargo expired on 02-May-2019 at 11:00 ET


Hubble Astronomers Assemble Wide View of the Evolving Universe

Astronomers have assembled an image containing about 265,000 galaxies that stretch back through 13.3 billion years of time. Called the Hubble Legacy Field, the snapshot represents the largest and most comprehensive “history book” of galaxies ever...

– Space Telescope Science Institute (STScI)

Hubble Legacy Field in MAST

includes video


Watching Concrete Explode

Even if concrete is not flammable, it can be hazardous in tunnel fires: high-performance concrete can explode at high temperatures. Although the phenomenon is well known, the physics behind it have not yet been fully understood. Empa researchers have...

– Empa, Swiss Federal Laboratories for Materials Science and Technology

Cement and Concrete Research, 2018; Empa Media release

includes video


High-speed experiments improve hypersonic flight predictions

ALBUQUERQUE, N.M. — When traveling at five times the speed of sound or faster, the tiniest bit of turbulence is more than a bump in the road, said the Sandia National Laboratories aerospace engineer who for the first time characterized the vibratio...

– Sandia National Laboratories

includes video


Researchers crack the peanut genome

Working to understand the genetics of peanut disease resistance and yield, researchers led by scientists at the University of Georgia have uncovered the peanut’s unlikely and complicated evolution.

– University of Georgia

Nature Genetics


Bats evolved diverse skull shapes due to echolocation, diet

In a paper published May 2 in Nature Communications, a University of Washington team reports that two major forces have shaped bat skulls over their evolutionary history -- echolocation and diet -- generating a huge diversity of skull shapes across m...

– University of Washington

Nature Communications, May 2019


Design Flaws Create Security Vulnerabilities for 'Smart Home' Internet-of-Things Devices

NC State researchers find countermeasures for designers of security systems and other smart home devices.

– North Carolina State University


Pinpointing Gaia to map the Milky Way

Gaia, operated by the European Space Agency (ESA, surveys the sky from orbit to create the largest, most precise, three-dimensional map of our Galaxy.

– European Space Agency (ESA)


Chewing versus sex in the duck-billed dinosaurs

The duck-billed hadrosaurs walked the Earth over 90-million years ago and were one of the most successful groups of dinosaurs.

– University of Bristol

Paleobiology


Spider Venom Is a Dangerous Cocktail

Over the past decades, the research of spider venom mainly focused on the neurotoxins it contains.

– University of Bern

Toxins


Scientists Discover Evolutionary Link to Modern-Day Sea Echinoderms

Scientists at The Ohio State University have discovered a new species that lived more than 500 million years ago—a form of ancient echinoderm that was ancestral to modern-day groups such as sea cucumbers, sea urchins, sea stars, brittle stars and c...

– Ohio State University

Bulletin of Geosciences


Earth system scientists produce online forest remote sensing handbook

Researchers at The University of Alabama in Huntsville (UAH) have produced a new volume entitled “Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) Handbook: Comprehensive Methodologies for Forest Monitoring and Biomass Estimation.”

– University of Alabama Huntsville


Students studying climate change in nature through national research program

Three West Virginia University graduate students spent the 2018-2019 academic year as Graduate Student Climate Adaptation Partners scholars. They developed a digital library and webinar series based on their climate change research.

– West Virginia University - Eberly College of Arts and Sciences


Study to Help Heat-Stressed Dairy Cows Weather Increasing Temperatures

A warming world represents a growing threat to the dairy industry. With climate change pushing global temperatures higher, finding scientific solutions that protect the well-being and productivity of dairy cows is critical. A Cornell researcher has w...

– Cornell University


Study Shows Value of Sharing Energy – Including Wind and Solar – Across America’s Grids

Researchers have determined there's economic value to expanding the connections between the country's eastern and western power grids. Expanding the connections could allow wind power from the Midwest and solar power from the Southwest to move back a...

– Iowa State University

SciWire Announcements


Hoda Mehrpouyan Earns NSF CAREER Award

Hoda Mehrpouyan, an assistant professor in the computer science department and associate director of the Cyber Lab for Industrial Control Systems, was awarded a National Science Foundation CAREER Award to further her cybersecurity and network researc...

– Boise State University


UVA's Edward H. Egelman Elected to Prestigious National Academy of Sciences

Egelman has attracted national and international headlines for discoveries such as how urinary tract infections take hold and how an almost indestructible virus survives and thrives in nearly boiling acid.

– University of Virginia Health System


New Editor-in-Chief Named for Cell Society’s Basic Research Journal

Matthew D. Welch of the University of California, Berkeley has been chosen to lead ASCB’s research journal, Molecular Biology of the Cell.

– American Society for Cell Biology (ASCB)

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