Newswise — Stony Brook, NY, August 15, 2019 – The Institute for Advanced Computational Science (IACS) at Stony Brook University has received a $6.3 million anonymous donation to advance data-driven research that will improve understanding of some of the world’s most pressing challenges, including climate change, machine learning and next generation nuclear energy, among others.

“Thanks to this exceptionally generous gift, our IACS researchers will redefine the boundaries of advanced computational science,” said Michael A. Bernstein, Interim President of Stony Brook University. “In the age of supercomputing, we have a profound ability to transform scientific understanding across disciplines. I am confident IACS will be at the forefront of these remarkable research endeavors.”

Advanced computational science accelerates the speed of calculations, allowing researchers to process data and develop conclusions beyond the scope of what was previously possible. Through advanced computation, Stony Brook’s IACS researchers are redefining scientific understanding across multiple disciplines.

“Whether modeling climate change, the inner workings of the human brain, or nuclear energies, our future is dependent on supercomputing and big data,” said Robert Harrison, PhD director of the IACS. “Research data has the powerful ability to evolve our perspectives and where new ideas emerge, innovation follows. This generous donation allows us to not only expand our resources but also empower scientific breakthroughs for a more prosperous future.”

The donation will help to expand research excellence, sustain the IACS with the hiring of additional staff, extend the Institute’s STRIDE program to all students and serve as seed money for engagement initiatives. Multidisciplinary research will be expanded in pursuit of the following themes:

  • Machine Learning and Statistical Inference for Scientific Discovery
  • Modeling, Simulation and Analysis of Complex Systems
  • High-Performance Computing and Future Computing Technologies
  • Making Sense of Data

Since 2012, the IACS has led efforts to communicate science, apply high-performance computing to bridge disciplines and enable data-driven research. The institute’s initial funding stemmed from a $10 million anonymous donation, plus matching funds of equal value from the Simons Foundation.

For more information about the IACS at Stony Brook University, visit iacs.stonybrook.edu.

 

 

About Stony Brook University

Stony Brook University, widely regarded as a SUNY flagship, is going far beyond the expectations of today’s public universities. With more than 26,000 students, 2,700 faculty members, nearly 200,000 alumni, an academic medical center, and 18 NCAA Division I athletic programs, it is one of only four University Center campuses in the State University of New York (SUNY) system. The University embraces its mission to provide comprehensive undergraduate, graduate, and professional education of the highest quality, and has been ranked among the top 35 public universities in the nation by U.S. News & World Report. Fostering a commitment to academic research and intellectual endeavors, Stony Brook’s membership in the Association of American Universities (AAU) places it among the top 62 research institutions in North America. The University’s distinguished faculty have earned esteemed awards such as the Nobel Prize, Pulitzer Prize, Indianapolis Prize for animal conservation, Abel Prize and the inaugural Breakthrough Prize in Mathematics. Part of the management team of Brookhaven National Laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy, Stony Brook is one of only eight universities that has a role in running a national laboratory. Providing economic growth for neighboring communities and the wider geographic region, the University totals an impressive $7.23 billion in increased economic output on Long Island. Follow us on Facebook (https://www.facebook.com/stonybrooku/) and Twitter (@stonybrooku).

 

 

 

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Newswise: Stony Brook University's Advanced Computing Institute Receives $6.3M Philanthropic Boost

Credit: Stony Brook University

Caption: Marivi Fernández-Serra, professor of Physics, analyzes a simulation of ions in water. Fernández-Serra’s research is in the field of computational condensed matter physics, where she develops and applies methods to study the atomic and electronic dynamics of complex materials. One of her main research areas is the study of fundamental properties of liquid water using quantum mechanical simulations, which requires very large sets of data to be processed by high performance computers, like those found at the Institute for Advanced Computational Science.

Newswise: Stony Brook University's Advanced Computing Institute Receives $6.3M Philanthropic Boost

Credit: Stony Brook University

Caption: Research by Jason Trelewicz, PhD, associate professor of Materials Science and Engineering, seeks to develop materials for next generation nuclear technologies, which are safer and more economical sources of nuclear power. As seen here, Trelewicz prepares to place a surrogate nuclear fuel pellet inside of a 3D X-ray microscope. The large sets of data collected from the microscope are processed by the high performance computing technology at the Institute for Advanced Computational Science.

Newswise: Stony Brook University's Advanced Computing Institute Receives $6.3M Philanthropic Boost

Credit: Stony Brook University

Caption: Liliana M. Dávalos, PhD, professor of Ecology and Evolution and researcher of evolution and trait diversity, monitors DNA samples collected from bats. With the supercomputing abilities offered by the Institute for Advanced Computational Science’s software, Dávalos analyzes millions of short bits of DNA within each sample and also compares thousands of genes. This high-performance data collection and analysis allows researchers like Dávalos to better understand the evolution of mammals and the emergence of new traits.

Newswise: Stony Brook University's Advanced Computing Institute Receives $6.3M Philanthropic Boost

Credit: Stony Brook University

Caption: Il Memming Park, PhD, assistant professor of Neurobiology and Behavior, meets with graduate students at the Institute for Advanced Computational Science to develop computationally efficient optimization techniques for modeling brain function. Through advanced computation, Park’s research is redefining the way that scientists analyze the dynamics of the brain. By analyzing large-scale physiological neural data collected from neural systems, Park examines how information is encoded as spatiotemporal patterns of neural activity, as well as how information is processed to perform specific computations within and across brain areas.