APA Offers Resources for Dealing with Racism, Aftermath of Charlottesville Violence

Article ID: 679526

Released: 14-Aug-2017 2:50 PM EDT

Source Newsroom: American Psychological Association (APA)

Newswise — WASHINGTON – The American Psychological Association has many resources available for the media and the public in covering and dealing with the aftermath of the recent violence in Charlottesville, Virginia.

Among them:  

Talking to kids about discrimination. This document can help parents and other caretakers understand how to broach the topics of discrimination and difference with young children.

RESilience: Uplifting youth through healthy communication about race provides resources to assist parents and others in promoting strength, health and well-being among youth of color.  

How to talk to children about difficult news offers insights on how to guide these conversations with children while making them feel safe.

Discrimination: What it is, and how to cope makes suggestions for healthy ways to deal with being the target of discrimination. 

Building resilience to manage indirect exposure to terror. The ability to adapt well to unexpected changes and events can help people manage distress and uncertainty. Here are some techniques. 

Helping your children manage distress in the aftermath of a shooting. Although no shooting occurred during the Charlottesville incident, many of the tips in this document are relevant for helping any child who is distressed by violence.

In addition, APA’s 2015 Stress in America survey found that most American adults reported having experienced discrimination, and that regardless of the cause, experiencing discrimination is associated with higher reported stress and poorer reported health.  

Report highlights:  www.apa.org/news/press/releases/stress/2015/highlights.aspx  

Full report: www.apa.org/news/press/releases/stress/2015/impact-of-discrimination.pdf.

Also of interest are several blog posts on race and race-related incidents. 

The American Psychological Association, in Washington, D.C., is the largest scientific and professional organization representing psychology in the United States. APA's membership includes nearly 115,700 researchers, educators, clinicians, consultants and students. Through its divisions in 54 subfields of psychology and affiliations with 60 state, territorial and Canadian provincial associations, APA works to advance the creation, communication and application of psychological knowledge to benefit society and improve people's lives.

 

www.apa.org

If you do not want to receive APA news releases, please let us know at public.affairs@apa.org or 202-336-5700.


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