Feature Channels: Race and Ethnicity

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Released: 16-Jun-2023 10:05 AM EDT
MSU experts involved with ICWA case can comment on SCOTUS decision
Michigan State University

On June 15, the United States Supreme Court issued a ruling that will protect the rights of tribes and Native American families when it comes to foster care and adoption proceedings involving Native children. Michigan State University experts with direct experience, research, advocacy and involvement in the case can comment on the Supreme Court's decision to uphold the Indian Childhood Welfare Act.

Released: 15-Jun-2023 2:20 PM EDT
Nearly 1 in 3 Black adults may develop PAD; disparities in care increase amputation risk
American Heart Association (AHA)

Routine, low-cost testing may reduce disparities and health care costs for people with peripheral artery disease (PAD), according to new American Heart Association scientific statement

14-Jun-2023 9:55 AM EDT
Study Finds That a Small Number of Teachers Effectively Double the Racial Gaps Among Students Referred for Disciplinary Action
American Educational Research Association (AERA)

The top 5 percent of teachers most likely to refer students to the principal’s office for disciplinary action do so at such an outsized rate that they effectively double the racial gaps in such referrals, according to new research released today.

Newswise: Diversity & Inclusion Expert Available to Discuss Juneteenth’s Importance, Growth
Released: 14-Jun-2023 8:25 PM EDT
Diversity & Inclusion Expert Available to Discuss Juneteenth’s Importance, Growth
Cedars-Sinai

Nicole M. Mitchell, Cedars-Sinai’s chief diversity and inclusion officer, is available for interviews to discuss the significance and growth of Juneteenth, also known as Emancipation Day or Freedom Day.

Released: 14-Jun-2023 5:45 PM EDT
Racial disparities found in one of first studies of pharmacological treatment of insomnia
Regenstrief Institute

In one of the first studies to investigate racial disparities in the pharmacologic treatment of insomnia, researchers from Regenstrief Institute and Indiana University report that patients belonging to racial minority groups were significantly less likely to be prescribed medication following diagnosis of insomnia than White patients.

Released: 14-Jun-2023 2:15 PM EDT
Remission rates of 1 in 100 people with type 2 diabetes in real world data
Niigata University

The phenomenon of improvement of glucose to levels in a normal range and cessation of the need for medication can occur in some patients diagnosed with type 2 diabetes who are provided with lifestyle therapy, temporary pharmacotherapy, bariatric surgery, or combinations of these treatments.

Released: 14-Jun-2023 10:05 AM EDT
Multi-city trial will use community centers to bring treatment to Black opioid users 
University of Illinois Chicago

A new clinical trial run by Howard University, the University of Illinois Chicago and the University of Miami Miller School of Medicine will partner with community organizations and sites to bring life-saving care closer to a highly vulnerable population – Black people with opioid use disorder.

Released: 13-Jun-2023 7:15 PM EDT
Four state policies linked to growth of telehealth at mental health facilities
RAND Corporation

Four state policies introduced during the COVID-19 pandemic to spur expansion of telehealth were associated with expansion of such services by mental health facilities, but growth of telehealth was lower among facilities in counties with the greatest proportion of Black residents, according to a new RAND Corporation study.

Newswise: McKee Foundation Awards Research Grant to TTUHSC El Paso’s Southwest Brain Bank
Released: 13-Jun-2023 12:30 PM EDT
McKee Foundation Awards Research Grant to TTUHSC El Paso’s Southwest Brain Bank
Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center El Paso

The Southwest Brain Bank's focus is on neuroscience research related to psychiatric illness. It is a research organization that collects, studies, and distributes donated brain tissue to scientists.

Newswise: Black patients with plaque build-up in arteries in the legs more likely to have a stroke, heart attack or amputation than white patients
Released: 13-Jun-2023 12:05 PM EDT
Black patients with plaque build-up in arteries in the legs more likely to have a stroke, heart attack or amputation than white patients
Keck Medicine of USC

A new study from Keck Medicine of USC has uncovered significant racial disparities in the diagnosis, treatment and outcomes of peripheral artery disease (PAD) among Black and white patients in the United States.

Newswise: Mental health counselors train to help communities, not just individuals
Released: 13-Jun-2023 7:00 AM EDT
Mental health counselors train to help communities, not just individuals
American Counseling Association

Many counseling students are pursuing civic engagement as part of their training. Newly published articles in Counseling Education and Supervision highlight pilot programs aimed at training counselors on how to get involved in antiracism and community support.

Newswise: Counselors need better training to help BIPOC clients, educators say
Released: 13-Jun-2023 6:00 AM EDT
Counselors need better training to help BIPOC clients, educators say
American Counseling Association

Counselors need to learn a form of interaction called cultural empathy, which involves honoring racial and cultural differences to better grasp a client’s experiences, according to a new journal article in Counseling Education and Supervision, a journal of the American Counseling Association.

Released: 12-Jun-2023 8:35 PM EDT
New study finds connection between long-standing gender and racial gaps in voting for Democrats
New York University

The persistent gender gap in voting for Democrats versus Republicans is, in part, because a higher proportion of women than men voters are Black and because Black voters have historically voted overwhelmingly Democratic, according to a new study by a team of sociologists.

Released: 12-Jun-2023 4:10 PM EDT
Racial justice in counselor training the focus of journal special issue
American Counseling Association

Many people of color live in areas devoid of mental health services or may receive treatments that fit poorly with their cultural values or complicate their racial trauma. A critical response to this inequity is better anti-racism education for counselors in training, educators say. More in the June special issue of Counselor Education and Supervision.

   
Released: 12-Jun-2023 2:10 PM EDT
Research sheds light on low rates of genetic testing for cancer
Michigan Medicine - University of Michigan

Not enough people are getting genetic testing for cancer, according to recent research.

Newswise: From 19th century “Indian remedies” to New Age spirituality
Released: 12-Jun-2023 10:05 AM EDT
From 19th century “Indian remedies” to New Age spirituality
Iowa State University

A new paper explores how the Kickapoo Indian Medicine Company pushed stereotypes and claimed authority on Indigenous culture in the 1800s to sell products. It also highlights several ironies. As “Indian remedies” became mainstream, the U.S. government rolled out policies to restrict Indigenous healing and spiritual practices, which are often intertwined.

Newswise: Study reveals how treatment-resistant prostate cancer provides its own hormonal fuel
Released: 9-Jun-2023 6:15 PM EDT
Study reveals how treatment-resistant prostate cancer provides its own hormonal fuel
Washington University in St. Louis

A new study in mice, led by researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis, explains how prostate cancer senses a drop in testosterone levels due to common anti-hormone therapy and then begins making cholesterol — a necessary precursor to testosterone — to generate its own testosterone to fuel tumor growth. The study also points to a possible drug combination that may stop the cancer from feeding its own growth.

Released: 9-Jun-2023 10:05 AM EDT
Addressing the Covid-Induced Crisis in K-12 Education
CFES Brilliant Pathways

COVID-19 wreaked havoc on K-12 and postsecondary education across the U.S. Test scores in foundational subject areas such as reading and math fell to their lowest levels in decades, absenteeism worsened, and students were more likely to drop out of high school and less likely to pursue post-secondary education. To understand the causes of the crisis and ultimately to find solutions, we have identified—through surveys, focus groups, observations, and research studies—three critical post-pandemic trends.

Newswise: Black, Hispanic Survivors of Breast Cancer Have Higher Death Rates from Second Cancers
Released: 9-Jun-2023 10:00 AM EDT
Black, Hispanic Survivors of Breast Cancer Have Higher Death Rates from Second Cancers
Johns Hopkins Medicine

Hispanic and non-Hispanic Black female survivors of breast cancer experience higher death rates after being diagnosed with a second primary cancer than members of other ethnic and racial groups, according to recent research from investigators at the Johns Hopkins Kimmel Cancer Center.

7-Jun-2023 9:55 AM EDT
Giving Parents Better School Quality Data Encourages Them to Consider Less Affluent, Less White Schools—To a Point
American Educational Research Association (AERA)

In a study published today in AERA Open, a peer-reviewed journal of the American Educational Research Association, researchers David M. Houston of George Mason University and Jeffrey R. Henig of Teachers College, Columbia University, found that providing parents with achievement growth data encourages them to consider schools with greater economic and racial diversity, but only up to a point.

Newswise: Sylvester study identifies ‘marked disparities’ in federal cancer research funding
7-Jun-2023 7:25 PM EDT
Sylvester study identifies ‘marked disparities’ in federal cancer research funding
Sylvester Comprehensive Cancer Center

A research team at Sylvester Comprehensive Cancer Center at the University of Miami Miller School of Medicine compiled and analyzed statistics from federal cancer research funding sources and found that funds tend to be allocated more heavily toward cancers that occur more often in non-Hispanic white people than in other racial and ethnic groups.

Released: 7-Jun-2023 4:00 PM EDT
Electronic health records can contain bias, potentially impacting clinical trials
University of Illinois Chicago

In a recent commentary, University of Illinois Chicago researchers and colleagues explain how embedded pragmatic clinical trials, or ePCTs, which test the effectiveness of medical interventions in real-world settings, potentially leave out people who are from underrepresented and underserved groups.

Newswise: Study: Heart Attack Outcomes Far Worse for Those With COVID-19
Released: 7-Jun-2023 2:45 PM EDT
Study: Heart Attack Outcomes Far Worse for Those With COVID-19
Cedars-Sinai

New research from the Smidt Heart Institute at Cedars-Sinai shows that patients who went to a hospital with a heart attack and were simultaneously sick with COVID-19 were three times more likely to die than patients experiencing a heart attack without a COVID-19 infection.

Released: 7-Jun-2023 12:35 PM EDT
Bilingual, digital health tool helps reduce alcohol use, UC Irvine-led study finds
University of California, Irvine

An automated, bilingual, computerized alcohol screening and intervention health tool is effective in reducing alcohol use among Latino emergency department patients in the U.S., according to a study led by the University of California, Irvine. “This is the first bilingual, large-scale, emergency department-based, randomized clinical trial of its kind in the country focused on English- and Spanish-speaking Latino participants,” said lead author Dr.

Released: 7-Jun-2023 10:05 AM EDT
Mount Sinai Reports Progress on Its Road Map for Action to Address Racism
Mount Sinai Health System

In a paper published in the journal Academic Medicine, Mount Sinai Health System authors describe progress on the health system’s Road Map for Action to Address Racism, which was developed to unify, systematize, and accelerate antiracism efforts across one of the largest academic medical centers in New York City.

Released: 6-Jun-2023 6:30 PM EDT
New study finds that women and underrepresented groups experience higher rates of sexual harassment, cyber incivility and negative workplace climate in academic medicine
Emory Health Sciences

A new study led by Winship Cancer Institute of Emory University researcher Reshma Jagsi, MD, DPhil, has found that women, racial and ethnic minorities and individuals identifying as lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender and queer are disproportionately affected by workplace mistreatment in academic medicine, and this mistreatment negatively impacts their mental health.

Newswise: Barriers to Breast Cancer-Screening in Vulnerable Populations
Released: 6-Jun-2023 1:15 PM EDT
Barriers to Breast Cancer-Screening in Vulnerable Populations
Sbarro Health Research Organization (SHRO)

Women of racial and ethnic minorities experience challenges that hinder adherence to regular mammography screenings.

Released: 6-Jun-2023 11:05 AM EDT
New Research Suggests Sleep Wearables Show Promise in Improving Sleep Health Among Marginalized Populations
JMIR Publications

New research highlights the potential of wearable sleep devices to improve sleep health among marginalized populations and identifies possible barriers to the acceptance and adoption of wearable technologies

Released: 6-Jun-2023 8:30 AM EDT
New Report Highlights U.S. 2021 Gun-Related Deaths: For Second Straight Year, U.S. Firearm Fatalities Reached Record Highs
Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health

A new report from the Johns Hopkins Center for Gun Violence Solutions analyzing 2021 Centers for Disease Control and Prevention data reveals another record year for firearm fatalities.

Newswise: MacNeal Hospital Mental Health Counselor Competes to be Crowned Miss Illinois and Advocates for LatinX Mental Health
Released: 5-Jun-2023 5:00 PM EDT
MacNeal Hospital Mental Health Counselor Competes to be Crowned Miss Illinois and Advocates for LatinX Mental Health
Loyola Medicine

Natalie Baeza, a mental health counselor at MacNeal Hospital, will be competing in the 2023 Miss Illinois Scholarship Competition beginning June 7th. She hopes to use her platform as the reigning Miss Cicero and experience as a counselor to help reduce the stigma surrounding mental health in the LatinX community.

Newswise: Fostering acceptance of sexual minorities in the Hispanic community
Released: 5-Jun-2023 4:00 PM EDT
Fostering acceptance of sexual minorities in the Hispanic community
University of Miami

A new intervention developed by a team of researchers and led by Guillermo “Willy” Prado, professor of nursing and health studies at the University of Miami, aims to curb devastating mental health trends and drug use among Hispanic youth who identify as sexual minorities.

   
Newswise: Race and Ethnicity Affect 21-Gene Recurrence Score, Overall Survival in Women with ER+ Breast Cancer
Released: 5-Jun-2023 1:30 PM EDT
Race and Ethnicity Affect 21-Gene Recurrence Score, Overall Survival in Women with ER+ Breast Cancer
Roswell Park Comprehensive Cancer Center

An observational cohort study out of Roswell Park Comprehensive Cancer Center demonstrates that race and ethnicity affect a woman’s 21-gene recurrence score, a tool used to determine risk of recurrence and distant metastasis in patients with early-stage, hormone-receptor-positive breast cancer. Based on the expression of 21 cancer-related genes detected in pre-treatment tumor specimens, recurrence score is used routinely in clinical care to identify patients who might benefit from chemotherapy as part of their treatment plan. Scores range from 0-100, with a score of 26 or higher indicating greater risk of recurrence and poorer overall survival.

Newswise: American Indian and Alaska Native Men Less Likely to Receive Prostate Cancer Screening
Released: 5-Jun-2023 11:30 AM EDT
American Indian and Alaska Native Men Less Likely to Receive Prostate Cancer Screening
Atrium Health Wake Forest Baptist

New research from Wake Forest University School of Medicine shows that American Indian and Alaska Native men are less likely to be screened for prostate cancer compared to other racial/ethnic groups. The study appears online in Cancer Causes & Control.

Released: 2-Jun-2023 1:15 PM EDT
Multiple Sclerosis More Prevalent in Black Americans Than Previously Thought
University of Maryland School of Medicine

Multiple sclerosis has traditionally been considered a condition that predominantly affects white people of European ancestry. However, a new analysis conducted by a North American team led by University of Maryland School of Medicine (UMSOM) researchers suggests that the debilitating neurological condition is more prevalent in Black Americans than once thought. It is also far more prevalent in Northern regions of the country including New England, the Dakotas, and the Pacific Northwest.

Released: 2-Jun-2023 10:45 AM EDT
Hispanic Women Still at Higher Risk for Births with Neural Tube Defects After Voluntary Folic Acid Fortification of Corn Masa Flour
Ann and Robert H. Lurie Children's Hospital of Chicago

The US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) mandated folic acid fortification of all enriched cereal grains in 1996, and this regulation resulted in a reduction of neural tube defect (NTD)–affected pregnancies for the population in the United States.

Released: 1-Jun-2023 10:40 AM EDT
American Sociological Association 2023 Elections Results
American Sociological Association (ASA)

Adia Harvey Wingfield, Professor of Sociology at the Washington University in St. Louis, has been elected the 116th President of the American Sociological Association. Allison J. Pugh, Professor of Sociology, University of Virginia, has been elected ASA Vice President.

Released: 1-Jun-2023 10:00 AM EDT
Black Men with Metastatic Prostate Cancer May Benefit From Drug Combination
Duke Health

A drug combination that shows little overall survival benefit in white men with advanced prostate cancer has a far greater effect in Black men with the disease, according to interim results from a study led by the Duke Cancer Institute.

Newswise: Dr. Sabrina Barata and Dr. Sara Encisco of Mercy Personal Physicians at Lutherville are Featured Guests for the June 2023 edition of “Medoscopy”
Released: 31-May-2023 2:15 PM EDT
Dr. Sabrina Barata and Dr. Sara Encisco of Mercy Personal Physicians at Lutherville are Featured Guests for the June 2023 edition of “Medoscopy”
Mercy Medical Center

Mercy's Drs. Sabrina Barata and Sara Encisco are the featured guests on the hospital's monthly talk show, “Medoscopy,” airing Tuesday and Wednesday, June 20th and 21st, at 5:30 p.m. EST (www.facebook.com/MercyMedicalCenter).

Newswise: TTUHSC El Paso Department of Pediatrics Welcomes New Endocrinologist
Released: 31-May-2023 1:00 PM EDT
TTUHSC El Paso Department of Pediatrics Welcomes New Endocrinologist
Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center El Paso

Pediatric endocrinologist diagnose and treat conditions affecting the endocrine glands and hormones of children and adolescents. As one of the very few pediatric endocrinologists along the U.S.-Mexico border, Dr. Zerah works with children up to age 18 with endocrine disorders of growth, puberty, thyroid, calcium metabolism and diabetes.

Released: 30-May-2023 12:05 PM EDT
Penn Medicine to Offer Free Cancer Screenings, including 3D Mammograms with Siemens Healthineers, at June Community Events in and around West Philadelphia
Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania

As part of a continued focus on making cancer screenings more accessible to the greater Philadelphia community, Penn Medicine is providing free cancer screenings, no insurance required, including advanced 3D mammograms, in West Philadelphia this June.

Released: 29-May-2023 10:35 PM EDT
Culturally-consistent midwifery care can optimize the mental health of pregnant Indigenous persons during the pandemic
McMaster University

The COVID-19 pandemic has had a significant impact on Indigenous individuals during pregnancy and the postpartum (perinatal) period.

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Newswise: Vehicle stop study illuminates importance of officer's first words
24-May-2023 2:00 PM EDT
Vehicle stop study illuminates importance of officer's first words
Virginia Tech

“Simply put, the officer starts off with a command rather than a reason in escalated stops.” Published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, the peer-reviewed research also found that Black men could often predict a stop’s outcome simply by listening to those same 45 words, which generally spanned less than 30 seconds.

Released: 25-May-2023 5:05 PM EDT
UC Irvine names new vice chancellor for equity, diversity and inclusion
University of California, Irvine

Dyonne Bergeron – an accomplished higher education leader in the areas of diversity, equity and inclusion; academic affairs; and student affairs – has been named chief diversity officer and vice chancellor for equity, diversity and inclusion at the University of California, Irvine, following a nationwide search.



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