Feature Channels: Geology

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Released: 27-Jan-2020 4:05 PM EST
In Cuba, Cleaner Rivers Follow Greener Farming
University of Vermont

For the first time in more than 50 years, a joint team of Cuban and U.S. field scientists studied the water quality of twenty-five Cuban rivers and found little damage after centuries of sugarcane production. They also found nutrient pollution in Cuba’s rivers much lower than the Mississippi River. Cuba’s shift to conservation agriculture after the collapse of the Soviet Union—and reduced use of fertilizers on cropland—may be a primary cause.

Newswise: Smaller Detection Device Effective for Nuclear Treaty Verification, Archaeology Digs
Released: 29-Jan-2020 3:20 PM EST
Smaller Detection Device Effective for Nuclear Treaty Verification, Archaeology Digs
American Institute of Physics (AIP)

Most nuclear data measurements are performed at accelerators large enough to occupy a geologic formation a kilometer wide. But a portable device that can reveal the composition of materials quickly on-site would greatly benefit cases such as in archaeology and nuclear arms treaty verification. Research published this week in AIP Advances used computational simulations to show that with the right geometric adjustments, it is possible to perform accurate neutron resonance transmission analysis in a device just 5 meters long.

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Released: 28-Jan-2020 2:45 PM EST
Study analyses potential global spread of new coronavirus
University of Southampton

Experts in population mapping at the University of Southampton have identified cities and provinces within mainland China, and cities and countries worldwide, which are at high-risk from the spread of the 2019 Novel Coronavirus (2019-nCoV).

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Released: 27-Jan-2020 3:40 PM EST
Earth's most biodiverse ecosystems face a perfect storm
Lancaster University

A combination of climate change, extreme weather and pressure from local human activity is causing a collapse in global biodiversity and ecosystems across the tropics, new research shows.

Newswise: New species of Allosaurus discovered in Utah
Released: 22-Jan-2020 5:55 PM EST
New species of Allosaurus discovered in Utah
University of Utah

A remarkable new species of meat-eating dinosaur, Allosaurus jimmadseni, was unveiled at the Natural History Museum of Utah. The huge carnivore inhabited the flood plains of western North America during the Late Jurassic Period, between 157-152 million years ago, making it the geologically oldest species of Allosaurus, predating the more well-known state fossil of Utah, Allosaurus fragilis.

Released: 23-Jan-2020 4:35 PM EST
Researcher looking for clues in the mystery of the Grand Canyon’s water supply
Northern Arizona University

Research technician Natalie Jones is the lead author on a paper that looked at how scientists model the vulnerability of karst formations around the Grand Canyon. Along with professor Abe Springer, she created a new model that can give land and water managers more information so they can better protect the water system.

Newswise: For now, river deltas gain land worldwide
Released: 23-Jan-2020 10:25 AM EST
For now, river deltas gain land worldwide
Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution

Researchers from Utrecht University in the Netherlands, Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI), and colleagues found that delta areas worldwide have actually gained land in the past 30 years, despite river damming. However, recent land gains are unlikely to last throughout the 21st century due to expected, accelerated sea level rise. The researchers published their findings in the journal Nature.

Newswise: Global river deltas increasingly shaped by humans, study says
Released: 22-Jan-2020 3:15 PM EST
Global river deltas increasingly shaped by humans, study says
Tulane University

The study by current and former researchers at Tulane University looked at nearly every delta in the world.

Newswise: Rising global temperatures turn northern permafrost region into significant carbon source
Released: 21-Jan-2020 7:05 PM EST
Rising global temperatures turn northern permafrost region into significant carbon source
Argonne National Laboratory

A new study that incorporates datasets gathered from more than 100 sites by institutions including the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) Argonne National Laboratory, suggests that decomposition of organic matter in permafrost soil is substantially larger than previously thought, demonstrating the significant impact that emissions from the permafrost soil could have on the greenhouse effect and global warming.

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Released: 21-Jan-2020 1:40 PM EST
Mars' water was mineral-rich and salty
Tokyo Institute of Technology

Presently, Earth is the only known location where life exists in the Universe. This year the Nobel Prize in physics was awarded to three astronomers who proved, almost 20 years ago, that planets are common around stars beyond the solar system.



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