Feature Channels: Race and Ethnicity

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Released: 26-Mar-2024 7:05 PM EDT
MSU researchers create a new health equity evaluation tool for Genesee County and the city of Flint
Michigan State University

Community-based organizations, nonprofits, policymakers and local residents will benefit from the first Health Equity Report Card, or HERC, for Genesee County and the city of Flint.

Released: 26-Mar-2024 4:05 PM EDT
Depression in Black people goes unnoticed by AI models analyzing language in Social Media posts
Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania

Analysis found that models developed to detect depression using language in Facebook posts did not work when applied to Black people's accounts

Newswise: Johns Hopkins Children’s Center Study Shows Negative Impact of COVID-19 Pandemic on Youth Minority Mental Health
Released: 26-Mar-2024 10:05 AM EDT
Johns Hopkins Children’s Center Study Shows Negative Impact of COVID-19 Pandemic on Youth Minority Mental Health
Johns Hopkins Medicine

Recent historical, political and public health events, most notably the COVID-19 pandemic, have collectively contributed to increased stress and mental health challenges among many groups of people — including adolescents in racial and ethnic minorities.

Released: 26-Mar-2024 8:05 AM EDT
Young Black men are dying by suicide at alarming rates
University of Georgia

One in three rural Black men reported they experienced suicidal ideation or thoughts of death in the past two weeks, reports a new study from the University of Georgia. Childhood adversity and racism may hold much of the blame.

Newswise: Study: Black men may be less likely to receive heart transplant than white men, women
Released: 26-Mar-2024 7:55 AM EDT
Study: Black men may be less likely to receive heart transplant than white men, women
Indiana University

Black patients in need of a heart transplant may be less likely to receive one than white patients, according to a new study led by Indiana University School of Medicine researchers.

Released: 25-Mar-2024 12:05 PM EDT
Friend or foe: A closer look at the role of health care algorithms in racial and ethnic disparities
Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania

For years, it was harder for Black patients to secure a coveted spot on the national kidney transplant waitlist because a clinical algorithm was making Black patients appear healthier than they were.

Newswise: High neighborhood eviction rate may harm Black moms’ mental health
Released: 25-Mar-2024 10:05 AM EDT
High neighborhood eviction rate may harm Black moms’ mental health
Ohio State University

Living in a neighborhood with high eviction rates over time is associated with higher rates of psychological distress among pregnant Black women compared to those who live in areas with lower eviction rates, a new study has found.

Newswise:Video Embedded young-african-students-call-out-racial-stereotypes-in-tiktok-first
VIDEO
Released: 20-Mar-2024 4:30 PM EDT
Young African students call out racial stereotypes in TikTok first
University of South Australia

Assumptions, misconceptions, and stereotypes – no one wants to be judged by how they look or where they’re from. But for many Black African students, that’s their reality and it’s taking a serious toll on their wellbeing and sense of belonging.

Newswise: Sylvester receives 2 US Department of Defense grants to study endometrial cancer in Black women
Released: 19-Mar-2024 11:05 PM EDT
Sylvester receives 2 US Department of Defense grants to study endometrial cancer in Black women
Sylvester Comprehensive Cancer Center

Researchers at Sylvester Comprehensive Cancer Center have received two new three-year, $1 million grants from the U.S. Department of Defense to study endometrial cancer in Black women who were born in the U.S., the Caribbean and West Africa.

Released: 18-Mar-2024 9:05 AM EDT
American Society of Nephrology and Home Dialysis University Expand Collaboration to Enhance Home Therapies Education for Nephrology Fellows
American Society of Nephrology (ASN)

The American Society of Nephrology (ASN) and Home Dialysis University (HDU) launched a collaboration in 2023 to improve nephrology trainees’ knowledge, proficiency, and exposure to home dialysis therapies.

Released: 15-Mar-2024 9:15 AM EDT
Study of Fatal and Nonfatal Shootings by Police Reveals Racial Disparities, Dispatch Risks
Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health

A new study from researchers at the Johns Hopkins Center for Gun Violence Solutions and Vanderbilt University found that an average of 1,769 people were injured annually in police shootings from 2015 to 2020, 55 percent of them or 979 people, fatally.

 
Newswise:Video Embedded uncovering-why-more-black-women-than-ever-are-being-diagnosed-with-multiple-sclerosis
VIDEO
11-Mar-2024 5:05 PM EDT
Uncovering why more Black women than ever are being diagnosed with multiple sclerosis
Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center

Women are more likely than men to get diagnosed with multiple sclerosis (MS), an incurable disease that affects the central nervous system.

Newswise:Video Embedded colorectal-cancer-not-an-old-people-s-disease-anymore
VIDEO
Released: 12-Mar-2024 2:05 PM EDT
Colorectal cancer ‘not an old people’s disease anymore’
University of Washington School of Medicine

Dr. Issaka’s comments follow the January release of the American Cancer Society’s Cancer statistical report for 2024. Among people under 50 in the U.S., the report said, colorectal cancer is currently the No. 1 cause of cancer death among men and the No. 2 cause of death among women.

Released: 12-Mar-2024 6:05 AM EDT
Same ER. Same patient. Different visit. Different race and ethnicity?
Michigan Medicine - University of Michigan

The effort to find and fight health disparities relies on data from millions of patients, including their race and ethnicity. But a new study finds the same patient might have different data recorded at separate ER visits.

Released: 11-Mar-2024 9:05 AM EDT
Study Shows An Anti-Racist School Program Didn’t Stress Out Kids
North Carolina State University

A new study of how high school students respond to a program designed to increase the frequency and quality of conversations about race in school finds that the anti-racist intervention did not cause stress or feelings of alienation among study participants.

Released: 11-Mar-2024 9:05 AM EDT
Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai Establishes Institute for Equity and Justice in Health Sciences Education
Mount Sinai Health System

The Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai announced today the establishment of the Institute for Equity and Justice in Health Sciences Education. The Institute will expand upon Icahn Mount Sinai’s anti-racist, anti-biased learning and training environment in medical and graduate education.

   
Released: 11-Mar-2024 8:05 AM EDT
Study Identifies Successful Methods to Recruit South Asian Women for Breast Cancer Research
Rutgers University-New Brunswick

Rutgers Health experts, conducting research during the COVID-19 pandemic, found that radio is an effective recruitment tool

1-Mar-2024 8:05 AM EST
Black People Half as Likely to Be Evaluated for Genetic Testing as White People
American Academy of Neurology (AAN)

Genetic testing has become a more common way to diagnose and manage many neurologic conditions including dementia, Parkinson’s disease and epilepsy, but a new study has found not everyone may have the same level of access to these tests. Black people were half as likely as white people to be evaluated for genetic testing, according to a study published in the March 6, 2024, online issue of Neurology®, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology.

Newswise:Video Embedded inspiring-the-next-generation-of-diverse-healthcare-leaders
VIDEO
Released: 5-Mar-2024 6:05 PM EST
Inspiring the Next Generation of Diverse Healthcare Leaders
Cedars-Sinai

Hundreds of students, parents, educators, healthcare professionals and community leaders from across Southern California turned out at the second annual Black Men in White Coats Youth Summit.

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Released: 5-Mar-2024 4:55 PM EST
Building Financial Resilience in Africa to Address Labor Trafficking
School of Social Work, University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign

Through a multi-institutional partnership funded by the U.S. Department of State, a new research partnership seeks to reduce vulnerability to labor trafficking by enabling youth and young adults to achieve financial security and stability at home.

Released: 5-Mar-2024 9:05 AM EST
Developing New Approaches for Children With Cystic Fibrosis
Children's Hospital Los Angeles

Over the past decade, the advent of new medications has been a game changer for many children and adults with cystic fibrosis (CF). But while these therapies can significantly enhance lung function, they are not a cure—and not all patients are eligible for them. At Children’s Hospital Los Angeles, the Cystic Fibrosis Center is dedicated to improving the lives of all children with CF.

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This news release is embargoed until 4-Mar-2024 5:00 PM EST Released to reporters: 27-Feb-2024 2:00 PM EST

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29-Feb-2024 11:00 AM EST
Firearm Access and Gun Violence Exposure Are Common in Black and Native Communities
Rutgers University-New Brunswick

A New Jersey Gun Violence Research Center study is the first to provide nationally representative data on gun use, storage and violence within Black and American Indian/Alaskan Native (AIAN) families.

 
Released: 29-Feb-2024 11:05 AM EST
Parents, wealth, race drive girls’ chances to play sports
Ohio State University

The likelihood that a girl will participate in high school sports in the United States is driven not so much by individual choice, new research suggests. Instead, decisions made by parents, the wealth of one’s family and community, and racial dynamics matter.

Released: 28-Feb-2024 10:05 PM EST
New study finds high-dose inhaled nitric oxide decreases the risk of death among critically ill Black patients with COVID-19
University of Alabama at Birmingham

In a first-of-its-kind study published in the American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine, physician-scientists from the University of Alabama at Birmingham Marnix E. Heersink School of Medicine discovered that high-dose inhaled nitric oxide therapy may improve oxygenation and reduce the risk of mortality among critically ill Black patients with COVID-19.

Released: 27-Feb-2024 9:05 PM EST
Teens benefit from "forest bathing" – even in cities
University of Waterloo

Youth mental health in urban environments is significantly better when more nature is incorporated into city design.

Released: 23-Feb-2024 1:00 PM EST
African American patients on Medicaid are less likely to undergo surgery for carpal tunnel syndrome
Wolters Kluwer Health: Lippincott

African American patients with carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) are less likely to receive surgical treatment, reports the March issue of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery®, the official medical journal of the American Society of Plastic Surgeons (ASPS). The journal is published in the Lippincott portfolio by Wolters Kluwer.

Newswise: How discrimination, class, and gender intersect to affect Black Americans’ well-being
Released: 23-Feb-2024 10:05 AM EST
How discrimination, class, and gender intersect to affect Black Americans’ well-being
College of Agricultural, Consumer and Environmental Sciences, University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign

Black Americans experience racial discrimination as a chronic stressor that influences their quality of life. But it exists in conjunction with other social factors that may modify the impact in various ways. A new study from the University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign explores how discrimination, gender, and social class affect individual well-being and relationship quality for Black Americans.

Released: 21-Feb-2024 2:05 PM EST
Long COVID can happen to anyone. Keep up with the latest research on Long COVID on Newswise
Newswise

Stay informed! These are the latest research articles on "Long COVID" from the Coronavirus News Source on Newswise.

Newswise: From segregation to inspiration, James Griffin, M.D., is making history at Parkland and UT Southwestern
Released: 21-Feb-2024 10:05 AM EST
From segregation to inspiration, James Griffin, M.D., is making history at Parkland and UT Southwestern
UT Southwestern Medical Center

To call the connection James D. Griffin, M.D., has with UT Southwestern and Parkland Memorial Hospital lifelong is no exaggeration. Dr. Griffin was born at Parkland in 1958, when the labor and delivery ward was still segregated. More than six decades later, his colleagues at that hospital elected him President of the medical staff – the first Black physician to earn the honor.

16-Feb-2024 8:00 AM EST
Highways through historically redlined areas likely cause air pollution disparities today
American Chemical Society (ACS)

Historically "redlined" areas – neighborhoods with primarily Black or immigrant communities – are exposed to more air pollution than other urban neighborhoods. According to research published in ACS’ Environmental Science & Technology, the cause could relate to nearby highways or industrial parks.

Released: 21-Feb-2024 7:05 AM EST
Inaccurate pulse oximeter readings could limit transplants, heart pumps for Black patients with heart failure
Michigan Medicine - University of Michigan

University of Michigan researchers find that racially biased pulse oximeter readings may further limit opportunities for Black patients with heart failure — who are already less likely to get treatment — to receive potentially lifesaving therapies, such as heart pumps and transplants.

Released: 21-Feb-2024 1:05 AM EST
Geographic disparities in access to addiction treatment medication may be linked to race, ethnicity
University of Pittsburgh

Buprenorphine, a life-saving medication for opioid use disorder, is far less accessible in geographic areas of the United States with racially and ethnically diverse populations than in predominantly white areas, according to a new study of pre-pandemic data led by health policy scientists at the University of Pittsburgh School of Public Health published today in Journal of Addiction Medicine.

Newswise: New Study Unveils Dynamics of Sexual Racism Among Young Sexual Minority Black Men
Released: 19-Feb-2024 12:05 PM EST
New Study Unveils Dynamics of Sexual Racism Among Young Sexual Minority Black Men
School of Social Work, University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign

Ryan Wade, a professor at the University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign School of Social Work, has published a new research article titled “Whose Role is It Anyway? Sexual Racism and Sexual Positioning Among Young Sexual Minority Black Men” in the Journal of Sex Research. This insightful study sheds light on a pressing issue within the LGBTQ+ community.

Newswise: JMU professor had key role in founding National Black MBA Association
Released: 19-Feb-2024 11:15 AM EST
JMU professor had key role in founding National Black MBA Association
James Madison University

Alexander Gabbin, a director and professor of accounting at James Madison University, was one of the founding members of the NBMBAA and served as the treasurer for the 1970 conference, one of many accomplishments in his distinguished career.

Newswise: Inequities in HIV testing, diagnosis and care for people with intellectual and developmental disabilities
Released: 15-Feb-2024 2:00 PM EST
Inequities in HIV testing, diagnosis and care for people with intellectual and developmental disabilities
Michigan Medicine - University of Michigan

There is a large discrepancy in HIV care and education for those with intellectual disabilities that results in an increase in HIV in the population.

Released: 13-Feb-2024 11:05 AM EST
Life doesn't stop at age 65. Get the latest on seniors and healthy aging in the Seniors channel
Newswise

Below are some of the latest research and features on this growing population of older adults in the Seniors channel on Newswise.

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Released: 12-Feb-2024 8:05 PM EST
Cedars-Sinai Experts Share Latest Research on Orthopedic Care
Cedars-Sinai

Surgeons and investigators from Cedars-Sinai Orthopaedics bring their leading-edge expertise in treatment and the latest clinical research to the annual meeting of the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons (AAOS) in San Francisco February 12-16.

Newswise: ‘I’m watching you’ behavior produces racial disparities in school discipline
Released: 12-Feb-2024 2:05 PM EST
‘I’m watching you’ behavior produces racial disparities in school discipline
University of Notre Dame

Research from Calvin Zimmermann, the O’Shaughnessy Assistant Professor of Education in the Department of Sociology at the University of Notre Dame, indicates that early childhood teachers often apply discipline disproportionately in their classrooms based on a student’s race.

Released: 12-Feb-2024 12:05 PM EST
Black students with dyslexia may go undiagnosed: Study
Yale School of Medicine

Researchers at Yale School of Medicine and the Dyslexia Resource Center find in a new study that Black students with dyslexia may be overlooked in schools.

   
Released: 12-Feb-2024 12:05 PM EST
Rutgers Bildner Center Wins NJCH Grant for Symposium, “Black Americans, Jewish Americans: Historical Intersections, Collisions, and Passings,” and Public Programming
Rutgers University-New Brunswick

Nancy Sinkoff, professor of history and Jewish studies and the academic director of the Rutgers Bildner Center, has had a longstanding interest in themes of racial and ethnic “passing” for Black and Jewish Americans.

Released: 11-Feb-2024 9:05 PM EST
Black women in the US murdered six times more often than White women over last 20 years
Columbia University, Mailman School of Public Health

Black women in the U.S were, on average, six times more likely to be murdered than their white peers for the years 1999 through 2020, according to an analysis of racial disparities in U.S. homicide rates released by Columbia University Irving Medical Center and Columbia’s Mailman School of Public Health.

Released: 11-Feb-2024 8:05 PM EST
Language barriers could contribute to higher aggression in people with dementia
Edith Cowan University

Immigrants living with dementia were more likely to present with agitation and aggression compared with their non-immigrant counterparts, a new study by Edith Cowan University (ECU) in collaboration with The Dementia Centre, HammondCare, found.

Released: 9-Feb-2024 2:20 PM EST
For Black patients, 'representation matters' in evaluating prostate cancer websites
Wolters Kluwer Health: Lippincott

For Black men with prostate cancer, racial representation is a key factor affecting trust in websites offering information on prostate cancer, reports a study in the March issue of The Journal of Urology®, an Official Journal of the American Urological Association (AUA).

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Released: 9-Feb-2024 10:05 AM EST
Community Conversations: Inspiring Black Youth in Medicine
Cedars-Sinai

Cedars-Sinai and BlackDoctor.org will host a virtual community conversation to help inspire Black doctors considering a career in medicine, research and healthcare.

8-Feb-2024 11:05 AM EST
Certain Older Americans Show Hesitation Around Brain Scan Research
Rutgers University-New Brunswick

Rutgers Health researchers find differences among Asian older adults’ support of research and inclination to receive MRI results.



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