Feature Channels: Neuro

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Newswise: Why Zika virus caused most harmful brain damage to Brazilian newborns
Released: 18-Feb-2020 3:25 PM EST
Why Zika virus caused most harmful brain damage to Brazilian newborns
Washington University in St. Louis

Researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis have found that the strain of Zika that circulated in Brazil during the microcephaly epidemic that began in 2015 was particularly damaging to the developing brain.

Newswise: Study Finds Empathy Can Be Detected in People Whose Brains Are at Rest
Released: 18-Feb-2020 2:10 PM EST
Study Finds Empathy Can Be Detected in People Whose Brains Are at Rest
University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA), Health Sciences

UCLA researchers have found that it is possible to assess a person’s ability to feel empathy by studying their brain activity while they are resting rather than while they are engaged in specific tasks.

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Released: 18-Feb-2020 11:30 AM EST
Despite a marked reduction in the prevalence of dementia, the number of people with dementia is set to double by 2050 according to new Alzheimer Europe report
Alzheimer Europe

Today, at a European Parliament lunch debate hosted by Christophe Hansen MEP (Luxembourg), Alzheimer Europe launched a new report presenting the findings of its collaborative analysis of recent prevalence studies and setting out updated prevalence rates for dementia in Europe.

Newswise: Component of Human Breast Milk Enhances Cognitive Development in Babies
Released: 18-Feb-2020 10:45 AM EST
Component of Human Breast Milk Enhances Cognitive Development in Babies
Children's Hospital Los Angeles

Maternal factors, such as breast milk, have been shown to affect a baby’s development, and previous animal studies have determined that a carbohydrate, the oligosaccharide 2’FL found in maternal milk, positively influences neurodevelopment.

Newswise: Researchers discover how cells clear misfolded proteins from tissues
Released: 10-Feb-2020 9:55 AM EST
Researchers discover how cells clear misfolded proteins from tissues
The Rockefeller University Press

Researchers in Japan have identified a new quality control system that allows cells to remove damaged and potentially toxic proteins from their surroundings. The study, which will be published February 18 in the Journal of Cell Biology, finds that the Clusterin protein and heparan sulfate proteoglycans combine to bring misfolded proteins into cells for degradation. The findings may lead to new therapeutic targets for neurodegenerative disorders, including Alzheimer’s disease.

Released: 17-Feb-2020 1:55 PM EST
Breaking the Communication Code
University of Delaware

Ever wonder how mice talk to each other? We don’t have a dictionary quite yet, but UD neuroscientist Josh Neunuebel and his lab have linked the ultrasonic vocalizations made by mice with specific behaviors. It’s a significant advance of our understanding of communication science.

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Released: 17-Feb-2020 12:55 PM EST
A smart jumpsuit provides information on infants' movement and development
University of Helsinki

A new innovation makes it possible, for the first time, to quantitatively assess children's spontaneous movement in the natural environment.

Released: 14-Feb-2020 1:40 PM EST
Study: Disease-causing repeats help human neurons function
Michigan Medicine - University of Michigan

Researchers found that repeats in the gene that causes Fragile X Syndrome normally regulate how and when proteins are made in neurons.

Released: 17-Feb-2020 9:00 AM EST
B cells may travel to remote areas of the brain to improve stroke recovery
University of Kentucky

New University of Kentucky research shows that the immune system may target other remote areas of the brain to improve recovery after a stroke.

Newswise: Combination Drug Therapy For Childhood Brain Tumors Shows Promise In Laboratory Models
Released: 17-Feb-2020 8:00 AM EST
Combination Drug Therapy For Childhood Brain Tumors Shows Promise In Laboratory Models
Johns Hopkins Medicine

In experiments with human cells and mice, researchers at the Johns Hopkins Kimmel Cancer Center report evidence that combining the experimental cancer medication TAK228 (also called sapanisertib) with an existing anti-cancer drug called trametinib may be more effective than either drug alone in decreasing the growth of pediatric low-grade gliomas. These cancers are the most common childhood brain cancer, accounting for up to one-third of all cases. Low grade pediatric gliomas arise in brain cells (glia) that support and nourish neurons, and current standard chemotherapies with decades-old drugs, while generally effective in lengthening life, often carry side effects or are not tolerated. Approximately 50% of children treated with traditional therapy have their tumors regrow, underscoring the need for better, targeted treatments.



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