Feature Channels: Race and Ethnicity

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Released: 4-Oct-2023 2:05 PM EDT
Aging in place: U-M study highlights racial disparities among older adults
University of Michigan

Roughly 40% of older Black adults live with a disability, compared to only one-third of older adults overall.

Newswise: UAH Nursing researcher to study cardiometabolic disease among Black women in the Deep South
Released: 3-Oct-2023 3:05 PM EDT
UAH Nursing researcher to study cardiometabolic disease among Black women in the Deep South
University of Alabama Huntsville

A researcher at The University of Alabama in Huntsville (UAH) has been awarded a $179,000 subcontract to explore community-based strategies for reducing high-burden chronic disease like obesity, diabetes, heart disease and cancer as part of an overall award totaling $4.2 million.

Released: 3-Oct-2023 11:05 AM EDT
Organizing can give tenants power to effect change
Cornell University

In new research, Jamila Michener, associate professor of government, demonstrates how people within racially and economically marginalized communities can, through organizing, build political power in response to poor living conditions.

28-Sep-2023 11:05 PM EDT
Precision medicine navigators increase genomic testing rates for Black patients with prostate cancer
American Society for Radiation Oncology (ASTRO)

The presence of a clinical navigator to act as a liaison between people with prostate cancer and the health care system greatly increases the likelihood that patients, especially Black patients, will receive advanced testing that can help predict the severity of their disease and guide treatment, a new study suggests.

Newswise: Study Links Sleep Duration with Brain Volume in Older Hispanic Adults
Released: 29-Sep-2023 12:05 PM EDT
Study Links Sleep Duration with Brain Volume in Older Hispanic Adults
University of Miami Health System, Miller School of Medicine

The work of principal investigator Alberto Ramos, M.D., M.S., underscores the importance of sleep studies for a group that has an elevated risk for Alzheimer’s disease.

Newswise:Video Embedded why-breast-cancer-clinical-trials-need-to-include-more-black-women
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Released: 28-Sep-2023 2:05 PM EDT
Why Breast Cancer Clinical Trials Need to Include More Black Women
Rutgers Cancer Institute

Researchers are working to improve outcomes for Black women with breast cancer – including through increased participation in clinical trials, which helps find better ways to prevent, diagnose and treat cancer.

Released: 28-Sep-2023 2:05 PM EDT
5 Reasons It’s Important for People of Color to Take Part in Clinical Trials
Children's Hospital Los Angeles

To become part of the standard of care in doctors’ offices and hospitals and to be covered by health insurance, new medications and procedures go through a rigorous testing process.

Newswise: UTEP Awarded $7 Million to Support Hispanic-Serving Institutions Across the Country
Released: 27-Sep-2023 4:05 PM EDT
UTEP Awarded $7 Million to Support Hispanic-Serving Institutions Across the Country
University of Texas at El Paso

The new grant, known as NODE (Network Opportunities for Developing Equitable and Effective Evaluation at HSIs), is a six-year investment that will position UTEP to provide the first full portrait of the effectiveness of all grants funded by the NSF HSI program.

Released: 27-Sep-2023 12:50 PM EDT
Stay informed on women's health issues in the Women's Health channel
Newswise

Below are some of the latest headlines in the Women's Health channel on Newswise.

Released: 26-Sep-2023 3:05 PM EDT
FSU graduate claims Flannery O’Connor Award for Short Fiction
Florida State University

By: Mark Blackwell Thomas | Published: September 26, 2023 | 12:19 pm | SHARE: A Florida State University graduate whose fiction writing draws from his experience as an immigrant from Nigeria has earned the Flannery O’Connor Award for Short Fiction, one of the most prestigious awards in American literature. 

Newswise: New study finds disparities among management of pediatric chronic asthma
Released: 26-Sep-2023 2:05 PM EDT
New study finds disparities among management of pediatric chronic asthma
University of Pittsburgh

Black children may have more severe asthma episodes than their white counterparts but are less likely to be transported to the hospital by emergency medical services (EMS), according to a new study published in the journal Prehospital Emergency Care by University of Pittsburgh and UPMC researcher-physicians.

Newswise: Black bisexual women in rural areas are at highest risk for suicidal behaviors
Released: 26-Sep-2023 10:05 AM EDT
Black bisexual women in rural areas are at highest risk for suicidal behaviors
Penn State College of Medicine

Penn State College of Medicine researchers said they conducted a “first-of-its-kind study,” revealing how various demographic factors intersect to affect a person’s risk of having suicidal thoughts and behaviors.

   
21-Sep-2023 12:00 PM EDT
Companies may benefit from transparency about racial diversity efforts
American Psychological Association (APA)

Companies that reveal their struggles to increase racial diversity in their workforces are perceived as more trustworthy and committed to diversity than companies that remain silent, according to research published by the American Psychological Association.

   
Released: 22-Sep-2023 3:30 PM EDT
Newer diabetes treatments are understudied in Black populations and may be less beneficial
SAGE Publications UK

New research analysing the effects of two drugs used to treat type 2 diabetes indicates a consistent lack of cardiovascular and renal benefits in Black populations.

Released: 21-Sep-2023 9:55 AM EDT
How Racism Shapes Black Motherhood in the U.S.
North Carolina State University

Being a mom is hard. Being a Black mom is especially hard. A new study underscores the ways that being a Black mother in the United States involves navigating aspects of parenthood that are explicitly tied to dealing with anti-Black racism.

Released: 20-Sep-2023 1:30 PM EDT
Study finds firearm injuries increased in gentrified neighborhoods
Brigham and Women’s Hospital

Gentrification can have a ripple effect on communities. While it can improve certain conditions in typically low-income areas, rising housing costs can displace residents, causing social disruption and other downstream effects.

Released: 20-Sep-2023 8:05 AM EDT
Two-Thirds of U.S. Adults Receive Parental Support Into Their 40s
North Carolina State University

A new study finds that only a third of adults in the United States did not rely on their parents for some form of material support between their late teens and early 40s.

Released: 19-Sep-2023 10:20 AM EDT
Preschoolers show cultural differences in generosity, competitiveness
Washington State University

In a set of sharing experiments, Spanish-speaking Latino preschoolers were more likely to choose options that would be more generous to others, even over a more equal sharing choice.

Released: 18-Sep-2023 3:05 PM EDT
Firearm Violence Exposure in Black and American Indian/Alaska Native Communities Linked to Poorer Health
Rutgers University-New Brunswick

Indirect and direct exposure to firearm violence is harmful to mental and physical health, according to a Rutgers study

Released: 18-Sep-2023 1:05 PM EDT
Incarceration rates, falling in every US state, drive significant shifts in risk of prison for marginalized groups
University of Wisconsin–Madison

The risk of incarceration for Black men in the United States was cut nearly in half between 1999 and 2019, according to a new study that assesses the impact of falling rates of imprisonment in each of the 50 states.

15-Sep-2023 4:40 PM EDT
Study: Admissions Policies that Consider Grades and Test Scores in Context of Available Opportunities Are Linked to College Success
American Educational Research Association (AERA)

Indicators of high school grades and standardized test scores that take into account the levels of school, neighborhood, and family resources available to students are strongly associated with those students’ success in college, according to new research published today.

Released: 18-Sep-2023 7:45 AM EDT
Johns Hopkins Professors Join Civil Rights Leaders and Social Justice Advocates to Discuss Policy Innovations to Protect the Lives of Black Women and Girls in the U.S.
Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health

Bloomberg Assistant Professor of American Health in the Department of Mental Health Tiara Willie and Associate Professor and Associate Director of the PhD and Postdoctoral programs at the Johns Hopkins School of Nursing Kamila Alexander will join U.S. Representative Ilhan Omar (D-MN) and U.S. Representative Bonnie Watson-Coleman (D-NJ) on September 20, 2023, at 6 p.m. in the Grand Hyatt, Washington, D.C., and on livestream for a discussion about policy innovations to protect the lives of Black women and girls in the U.S.

Newswise: Study Finds Spiritual Coping Behaviors May Be Key To Enhanced Trauma Recovery of Black Men Who Survive Firearm Injury
Released: 14-Sep-2023 3:30 PM EDT
Study Finds Spiritual Coping Behaviors May Be Key To Enhanced Trauma Recovery of Black Men Who Survive Firearm Injury
University of Pennsylvania School of Nursing

High rates of firearm injury among urban Black men in the U.S. can lead to long physical and psychological recovery times, worsened by limited access to mental health services.

Newswise: Today’s Los Alamos employees play Manhattan Project ‘Labbies’ in Christopher Nolan’s ‘Oppenheimer’
Released: 14-Sep-2023 3:05 PM EDT
Today’s Los Alamos employees play Manhattan Project ‘Labbies’ in Christopher Nolan’s ‘Oppenheimer’
Los Alamos National Laboratory

On various sets around New Mexico in 2022, Los Alamos National Laboratory employees talked science and bumped fists with celebrities.

Released: 14-Sep-2023 11:00 AM EDT
Members of the National Association of Neonatal Nurses support efforts to promote racial equity
Wolters Kluwer Health: Lippincott

More than 90% of the active members of the National Association of Neonatal Nurses (NANN) believe the organization should pursue racial equity work, and many have specific suggestions for a strategic plan.

Not for public release

This news release is embargoed until 11-Sep-2023 5:00 PM EDT Released to reporters: 5-Sep-2023 2:00 PM EDT

A reporter's PressPass is required to access this story until the embargo expires on 11-Sep-2023 5:00 PM EDT The Newswise PressPass gives verified journalists access to embargoed stories. Please log in to complete a presspass application. If you have not yet registered, please Register. When you fill out the registration form, please identify yourself as a reporter in order to advance to the presspass application form.

Released: 11-Sep-2023 10:15 AM EDT
Traineeships Aim to Boost Inclusion, Support Minorities in Nuclear Physics
Brookhaven National Laboratory

Ambar Rodriguez-Alicea wants to explore the very basics of matter and the universe as we know it. As the aspiring physicist from Puerto Rico puts it, “I want a job that forces me to keep learning until the end.”

Newswise: Study links epigenetic changes to historic trauma in Alaska Native communities
Released: 8-Sep-2023 11:05 AM EDT
Study links epigenetic changes to historic trauma in Alaska Native communities
College of Liberal Arts and Sciences, University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign

Researchers investigated the relationship between historical trauma experienced by Alaska Native communities and epigenetic markers on genes that previous studies have linked to trauma.

   
Released: 8-Sep-2023 11:00 AM EDT
UIC’s Great Cities Institute launches Latino Research Initiative
University of Illinois Chicago

Initiative builds off of longstanding Latino-focused research at the University of Illinois Chicago

Released: 8-Sep-2023 10:30 AM EDT
Obstetrics & Gynecology devotes special issue to addressing racism in reproductive health
Wolters Kluwer Health: Lippincott

As part of its active efforts to dismantle systemic racism and promote principles of equity and inclusion within its editorial processes and content, Obstetrics & Gynecology, the official journal of the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists, has devoted its entire October 2023 issue to addressing racism in reproductive health.

Released: 7-Sep-2023 4:05 PM EDT
The sense of order distinguishes humans from other animals
Stockholm University

Remembering the order of information is central for a person when participating in conversations, planning everyday life, or undergoing an education.

Newswise: Most Non-English Speakers in the U.S. Are Turned Away Before Their First Cancer Visit According to New Research in JNCCN
31-Aug-2023 9:00 AM EDT
Most Non-English Speakers in the U.S. Are Turned Away Before Their First Cancer Visit According to New Research in JNCCN
National Comprehensive Cancer Network® (NCCN®)

New study in JNCCN from the University of Michigan found English speakers who call a hospital general information line were able to get information on next steps to access cancer care 94% of the time, compared to 38% for Spanish speakers and just 28% for Mandarin speakers.

Released: 6-Sep-2023 10:30 AM EDT
Beauty salon–based intervention increases trust of PrEP among Black cisgender women
Wolters Kluwer Health: Lippincott

Among African American and other Black cisgender women, a beauty salon–based intervention improved knowledge and awareness of pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) against HIV and increased trust in it.

Newswise: Study: Race, Ethnicity May Play a Role in Cause of Liver Cancer
29-Aug-2023 6:05 PM EDT
Study: Race, Ethnicity May Play a Role in Cause of Liver Cancer
Sylvester Comprehensive Cancer Center

Race and ethnicity may play a role in liver cancer, which disproportionately affects people of low socioeconomic status, as well as immigrants, veterans and incarcerated populations.

5-Sep-2023 9:00 AM EDT
Racial and socioeconomic differences still determine survival rates of premature babies in the US
University College London

The US continues to face stark inequalities in preterm birth and mortality rates between mothers of differing socioeconomic status and race, finds a new report led by UCL researchers.

Newswise: Illinois professor examines the critical role of food in the Civil Rights Movement
Released: 5-Sep-2023 9:55 AM EDT
Illinois professor examines the critical role of food in the Civil Rights Movement
College of Liberal Arts and Sciences, University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign

African American Studies professor Bobby J. Smith II examines how the Civil Rights Movement included struggles around food in his book “Food Power Politics: The Food Story of the Mississippi Civil Rights Movement.” The book is the inaugural title in the Black Food Justice series by the University of North Carolina Press.

Released: 31-Aug-2023 4:10 PM EDT
Children’s books are still Whiter, and more male, than US society
Oxford University Press

A new paper in the Quarterly Journal of Economics, published by Oxford University Press, finds that children’s books in the United States continue to underrepresent ethnic minorities.

Newswise: Professor to aid health study of Latina women at risk for metabolic syndrome
Released: 31-Aug-2023 1:05 PM EDT
Professor to aid health study of Latina women at risk for metabolic syndrome
Binghamton University, State University of New York

A Binghamton University, State University of New York researcher will lend his data-analysis skills to a landmark study of Latina women funded by the National Institutes of Health.

Released: 31-Aug-2023 8:05 AM EDT
Pulmonary embolism deaths, disparities high despite advancements in care
Michigan Medicine - University of Michigan

Despite advancements in care, a Michigan Medicine study finds that the death rate for pulmonary embolism remains high and unchanged in recent years – more often killing men, Black patients and those from rural areas.

29-Aug-2023 5:55 PM EDT
Parental incarceration increases cardiovascular risk in young adults
University of Chicago Medical Center

New research from UChicago Medicine suggests parental incarceration elevates cardiovascular risk in early adulthood, potentially contributing to larger health disparities.

29-Aug-2023 5:00 PM EDT
New research establishes enduring connection between racial segregation, childhood blood lead levels
University of Illinois Chicago

Living in a racially segregated neighborhood puts Black children at a higher risk of having elevated blood lead levels, and this association has persisted over more than two decades, according to new research from the Children’s Environmental Health Initiative, which is led by University of Illinois Chicago Chancellor Marie Lynn Miranda.

Released: 29-Aug-2023 11:05 AM EDT
Prevalence of disabilities for older Black & White Americans plummeted from 2008 to 2017
University of Toronto

The prevalence of three different types of disabilities among Black and White Americans aged 65 and older plummeted in the decade between 2008 and 2017 according to a new nationally representative study published online in the International Journal of Ageing and Human Development.

Newswise: An antiracist approach to intelligence research: Q&A with LaTasha Holden
Released: 29-Aug-2023 1:05 AM EDT
An antiracist approach to intelligence research: Q&A with LaTasha Holden
Beckman Institute for Advanced Science and Technology, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

Traditional perceptions of intelligence may have created unfair limitations for students, especially those from historically marginalized communities. Beckman researcher and psychology professor LaTasha Holden believes that changing our fundamental understanding of what intelligence is can help develop antiracist practices and build a more equitable society.

Not for public release

This news release is embargoed until 28-Aug-2023 5:00 PM EDT Released to reporters: 22-Aug-2023 2:00 PM EDT

A reporter's PressPass is required to access this story until the embargo expires on 28-Aug-2023 5:00 PM EDT The Newswise PressPass gives verified journalists access to embargoed stories. Please log in to complete a presspass application. If you have not yet registered, please Register. When you fill out the registration form, please identify yourself as a reporter in order to advance to the presspass application form.



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