Feature Channels: Race and Ethnicity

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31-Jul-2023 1:45 PM EDT
Study defines disparities in memory care
Washington University in St. Louis

Members of minoritized racial or ethnic groups and people who live in less affluent neighborhoods are less likely than others to receive specialized care for dementia, including Alzheimer’s disease, a new study from Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis indicates.

31-Jul-2023 12:55 PM EDT
Study Finds Black People Less Likely to Be Seen at Memory Clinic Than White People
American Academy of Neurology (AAN)

Black people and people living in less affluent neighborhoods—areas with higher poverty levels and fewer educational and employment opportunities— may be less likely to be seen at a memory care clinic compared to white people and people living in neighborhoods with fewer disadvantages, according to new research published in the August 2, 2023, online issue of Neurology®, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology.

31-Jul-2023 10:30 AM EDT
Cost of Translating Consent Documents May Serve as a Barrier to Participation of Members of Underrepresented Groups in Clinical Trials
University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA), Health Sciences

Cancer research centers conducting clinical trials could enroll more patients from underrepresented racial and ethnic groups by placing greater emphasis on relieving investigators of the costs of translating consent documents into languages other than English, according to a UCLA Jonsson Comprehensive Cancer Center study.

31-Jul-2023 12:05 PM EDT
Genetic variant linked to lower levels of HIV virus in people of African ancestry
University of Cambridge

An international team of researchers has found a genetic variant that may explain why some people of African ancestry have naturally lower viral loads of HIV, reducing their risk of transmitting the virus and slowing progress of their own illness.

Released: 1-Aug-2023 3:55 PM EDT
Immigrant nurses in long-term care facilities often have more “human capital” compared to American-born nurses
University of Missouri, Columbia

When assessing the skills and competencies or “human capital” of long-term care registered nurses in the United States, studies often focus solely on years of experience and traditional educational backgrounds.

Released: 1-Aug-2023 3:20 PM EDT
Where Black adolescents live affects their mental health
George Mason University

It’s easy to imagine that growing up in a neighborhood with safe and clean parks, little to no discrimination, and where people are not struggling financially makes for a lower-stress childhood.

   
Newswise: Study explores challenges, opportunities of community participatory research
Released: 1-Aug-2023 10:25 AM EDT
Study explores challenges, opportunities of community participatory research
College of Agricultural, Consumer and Environmental Sciences, University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign

Community-based participatory research (CBPR) is an approach that connects academic researchers with community partners to inform project development. A new study from the University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign and collaborators explores CBPR implementation in a project on criminal justice reform in Cincinnati.

Released: 31-Jul-2023 10:40 AM EDT
Analysis of Court Transcripts Reveals Biased Jury Selection
Cornell University

Cornell researchers have shown that data science and artificial intelligence tools can successfully identify when prosecutors question potential jurors differently, in an effort to prevent women and Black people from serving on juries.

Newswise: Study Uncovers Barriers to Mammography Screening Among Black Women
Released: 31-Jul-2023 8:30 AM EDT
Study Uncovers Barriers to Mammography Screening Among Black Women
Florida Atlantic University

The study finds utilization of annual screening mammograms suboptimal among low-income Black women with several reported perceived and actual barriers. Most had a low breast cancer risk perception. Interestingly, participants perceived mammograms as very beneficial: 80 percent believed that ‘if breast cancer is found early, it’s likely that the cancer can be successfully treated;’ 90 percent indicated that ‘having a mammogram could help find breast cancer when it is first getting started.’

Newswise: TTUHSC El Paso Receives $6 Million CPRIT Grant for Research on Cancer in Hispanics
Released: 28-Jul-2023 6:00 PM EDT
TTUHSC El Paso Receives $6 Million CPRIT Grant for Research on Cancer in Hispanics
Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center El Paso

“We’re situated in a unique position to address the growing cancer burden among the Hispanic community,” said Dr. Lakshmanaswamy, a biomedical science professor who directs the university’s Center of Emphasis in Cancer. “Our goal is to improve access to health care for our Hispanic community members by developing novel biomarkers and therapeutics, grounded in an improved understanding of the biological, cultural and behavioral determinants of cancer."

Released: 28-Jul-2023 3:05 PM EDT
July 2023 Tip Sheet From Sylvester Comprehensive Cancer Center
Sylvester Comprehensive Cancer Center

A first-of-its kind drug for prostate cancer, an ancient retrovirus that may drive aggressive brain cancer, disparities in endometrial cancer rates among Black women, a new trial seeking answers for higher rates of aggressive prostate and breast cancer in Black men and women, and more are in this month’s tip sheet from Sylvester Comprehensive Cancer Center.

Released: 27-Jul-2023 4:00 PM EDT
Race/Ethnicity Isn't Associated with Unplanned Hospitalizations After Breast Reconstruction
Wolters Kluwer Health: Lippincott

Race/ethnicity is not an independent predictor of hospital readmission in patients undergoing breast reconstruction surgery, reports a study in the August issue of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery®, the official medical journal of the American Society of Plastic Surgeons (ASPS). The journal is published in the Lippincott portfolio by Wolters Kluwer.

Released: 27-Jul-2023 11:00 AM EDT
New research reveals historic migration’s link to present-day implicit racial bias
Society for Personality and Social Psychology

Roughly six million Black people moved away from the American South during the Great Migration between 1910 and 1970, hoping to escape racial violence and discrimination while pursuing economic and educational opportunities. Now, research has uncovered a link between this historic event with present-day inequalities and implicit biases.

Released: 26-Jul-2023 5:10 PM EDT
DNA analysis offers new insights into diverse community at Machu Picchu
Yale University

A genetic analysis suggests that the servants and retainers who lived, worked, and died at Machu Picchu, the renowned 15th century Inca palace in southern Peru, were a diverse community representing many different ethnic groups from across the Inca empire.

Released: 26-Jul-2023 1:00 PM EDT
Mapping mass shootings in the United States
University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus

The United States has more than 10 times the number of mass shooting incidents than other developed countries, yet little research has shown the distribution and types of shootings, geographically.

   
Newswise: Researcher works to improve diagnosis speed for rare conditions like the one her child was ‘lucky’ to survive
Released: 25-Jul-2023 9:35 AM EDT
Researcher works to improve diagnosis speed for rare conditions like the one her child was ‘lucky’ to survive
West Virginia University

The study of delays in diagnoses of rare diseases from Katie Corcoran, a sociologist in the West Virginia University Eberly College of Arts and Sciences, will evaluate the impact of patients’ race and gender and whether physicians share large numbers of patients.

Newswise: Mount Sinai Receives Significant Funding to Study Which Coronary Revascularization Procedure Best Improves Survival and Quality of Life for Women and Underserved Minority Groups
Released: 25-Jul-2023 9:00 AM EDT
Mount Sinai Receives Significant Funding to Study Which Coronary Revascularization Procedure Best Improves Survival and Quality of Life for Women and Underserved Minority Groups
Mount Sinai Health System

The Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai will help lead and launch the first clinical trial focusing on women and minority populations to determine which coronary revascularization procedure best improves their survival and quality of life.

Released: 25-Jul-2023 6:05 AM EDT
Solutions to the Challenges Faced by Black Males the Focus of Forthcoming Journal Issue
American Counseling Association

In a special forthcoming issue of the Journal of Multicultural Counseling and Development, a journal of the American Counseling Association (ACA), counseling and education researchers describe the distinct educational, vocational, psychological, social and health challenges that many Black men and boys face due to systemic racism and discrimination.

20-Jul-2023 10:30 AM EDT
CHOP Researchers Validate Pediatric “Allergic March” in Largest National Study of its Kind
Children's Hospital of Philadelphia

In the largest study of its kind, researchers from Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia (CHOP) used electronic health record (EHR) data from more than 200,000 pediatric patients to describe patterns of pediatric allergies across the United States, validating a population-level pattern of allergy development known as the “allergic march,” in which allergies first present as eczema, followed by food allergies, asthma, and environmental allergies. The researchers also found that a rare food allergy called eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE), which has historically been considered a disease affecting primarily White males, is more common among non-White patients than previously reported.

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Released: 24-Jul-2023 1:40 PM EDT
White Police Membership in Republican Party Associated with Racial Bias, Study Finds
American Sociological Association (ASA)

In the last 10 years, police organizations have displayed unprecedented support for Republican presidential candidates and have organized against social movements focused on addressing racial disparities in police contact.

Released: 24-Jul-2023 12:30 PM EDT
Diagnosis of Cystic Fibrosis Often Missed or Delayed, Especially in Non-White Infants
Ann and Robert H. Lurie Children's Hospital of Chicago

Ann & Robert H. Lurie Children’s Hospital of Chicago is leading an awareness campaign that aims to reduce missed or delayed diagnosis of cystic fibrosis after newborn screening, especially in non-White infants. In its first phase, the campaign targets primary care providers and public health officials, so that treatment can start earlier, which is linked to better outcomes for people with cystic fibrosis. The general public phase is expected to follow within the year.

Released: 24-Jul-2023 8:40 AM EDT
Gene Variant May Help Explain Why Black Individuals Are Prone to Severe Strokes
University of Utah Health

In a new study, University of Utah Health researchers have shown that a particular version of a gene may contribute to the higher severity of stroke seen among Black Americans. The findings could help scientists develop more effective stroke medications for people who carry the gene.

Released: 24-Jul-2023 7:05 AM EDT
Error sobre el melanoma: los tonos oscuros también están en riesgo
Mayo Clinic

Hace muchos años que persiste el mito de que las personas de piel oscura son inmunes al melanoma, un tipo de cáncer de piel.

Released: 24-Jul-2023 5:05 AM EDT
تصحيح مفهوم خاطئ عن الورم الميلانيني: البشرة الداكنة معرضة للخطر أيضًا
Mayo Clinic

إن الاعتقاد السائد بأن الأشخاص ذوي البشرة الداكنة محصنون ضد الورم الميلانيني، وهو نوع من أنواع سرطان الجلد، هو خرافة ترسخت على مدار عدة سنوات. وهو مفهوم خاطئ وخطير والذي أدى بالأشخاص إلى عدم بذلهم الجهد اللازم لحماية أنفسهم من الأشعة فوق البنفسجية الضارة.

Released: 20-Jul-2023 3:35 PM EDT
AI must not worsen health inequalities for ethnic minority populations
SAGE Publications UK

Scientists are urging caution before artificial intelligence (AI) models such as ChatGPT are used in healthcare for ethnic minority populations.

   
Released: 20-Jul-2023 12:30 PM EDT
Tell us how you really feel -- keep up with the latest research in Psychology and Psychiatry
Newswise

The latest research in psychology and psychiatry on Newswise.

       
Released: 20-Jul-2023 12:05 PM EDT
Sociologists to Explore Topics of Attacks on Public Education, Racial Justice, the Future of Democracy, and More at ASA Annual Meeting, Aug. 17-21, Philadelphia; Press Registration Open
American Sociological Association (ASA)

Approximately 600 sessions featuring over 3,000 research papers are open to the press. From race and racism to mental health, from climate control and environmental policy issues to artificial intelligence, sociologists are investigating and reporting on the most sensitive problems confronting American society.

Released: 20-Jul-2023 10:15 AM EDT
CHOP Researchers Develop Tool for Helping Predict Alzheimer’s Risk in Various Ethnic Populations
Children's Hospital of Philadelphia

Using data from diverse populations around the world, researchers have developed an algorithm to help predict the risk of developing Alzheimer’s disease based on genetic information in patients with a wide variety of ethnic backgrounds. While additional ethnicities should be included in future studies, this work aims to eliminate disparities in diagnosis of the disease.

Newswise: New Study Shows Black Cancer Survivors Face Increased Mortality From Heart Disease; Neighborhood Socioeconomic Status and Insurance Contributing Factors
19-Jul-2023 3:05 PM EDT
New Study Shows Black Cancer Survivors Face Increased Mortality From Heart Disease; Neighborhood Socioeconomic Status and Insurance Contributing Factors
American Cancer Society (ACS)

A new study from researchers at the American Cancer Society found that Black cancer survivors in the United States experience a higher risk of dying from cardiovascular disease compared with White cancer survivors.

Newswise: Study Highlights Racial and Ethnic Disparities in Public Health Education and the Importance of Faculty Diversity
Released: 20-Jul-2023 9:10 AM EDT
Study Highlights Racial and Ethnic Disparities in Public Health Education and the Importance of Faculty Diversity
George Washington University

A new study conducted by researchers at the Fitzhugh Mullan Institute for Health Workforce Equity at the George Washington University (GW) Milken Institute School of Public Health, and the Association of Schools and Programs of Public Health (ASPPH) identifies institutional characteristics associated with public health student diversity, including faculty diversity. The research, covering a five-year time period from 2016-2020, shows that - despite an upward trend in diversity in the public health educational pipeline - minority students remain underrepresented.

   
Newswise:Video Embedded c-mo-pueden-pacientes-de-minor-as-acceder-a-servicios-de-salud-mental
VIDEO
Released: 20-Jul-2023 8:25 AM EDT
¿Cómo Pueden Pacientes de Minorías Acceder a Servicios de Salud Mental?
Cedars-Sinai

Las personas que pertenecen a grupos minoritarios raciales y étnicos tienen menos probabilidades de recibir atención médica mental que las personas blancas. La Dra. Anna Solt, psiquiatra de Cedars-Sinai, comentó que el limitado acceso a la atención de la salud mental, los estigmas culturales e incluso las creencias estereotipadas dentro de una cultura pueden causar barreras para el tratamiento de la salud mental.

Newswise: NIH awards $3M to Wayne State to impact Black youth with type 1 diabetes
Released: 19-Jul-2023 1:35 PM EDT
NIH awards $3M to Wayne State to impact Black youth with type 1 diabetes
Wayne State University Division of Research

A Wayne State University School of Medicine professor has received a $3 million award from the National Institute on Minority Health and Health Disparities of the National Institutes of Health to develop an intervention aimed at improving health outcomes in Black youth with type 1 diabetes.

Newswise:Video Embedded how-can-minority-patients-find-mental-health-services
VIDEO
Released: 19-Jul-2023 12:20 PM EDT
How Can Minority Patients Find Mental Health Services?
Cedars-Sinai

People belonging to racial and ethnic minority groups are less likely than white people to receive mental healthcare.

Released: 18-Jul-2023 5:40 PM EDT
Interracial relationships don’t always make people less racist
Rice University

The landmark United States Supreme Court ruling in Loving v. Commonwealth of Virginia abolished bans on interracial marriage in the United States in 1967, but a new academic paper from Rice University and Texas A&M University said an uptick in interracial relationships since then has not ended discriminatory tendencies, even among individuals who are in these romantic partnerships.

Released: 18-Jul-2023 4:05 PM EDT
UCLA biobank study reveals disease risk, heath care use among LA’s diverse population
University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA), Health Sciences

The research underscores the limitations of the health care system’s frequent reliance on broad self-reported race and ethnicity data to assess patients’ risk of developing disease, and the findings also support expanding genetic screening to more groups.

Newswise: MedStar Washington Hospital Center Named the Most Socially and Racially Responsible Hospital in the District
Released: 18-Jul-2023 10:15 AM EDT
MedStar Washington Hospital Center Named the Most Socially and Racially Responsible Hospital in the District
MedStar Washington Hospital Center

MedStar Washington Hospital Center is the most socially responsible hospital in Washington, D.C. and is among the top in the nation, according to the Lown Institute. The 2023-24 Lown Institute Hospitals Index evaluated more than 3,600 hospitals nationwide, and MedStar Washington ranked #1 in D.C. and is among 54 U.S. hospitals to earn Honor Roll status with “A” grades in all top categories: Social Responsibility, Health Equity, Value of Care, and Patient Outcomes. It also named MedStar Washington the most racially inclusive hospital in the District.

Released: 17-Jul-2023 1:05 PM EDT
Positive contact with diverse groups can reduce belief in conspiracy theories about them
University of Nottingham

New research has shown that having positive contact with people from diverse groups can reduce the development of harmful intergroup conspiracy beliefs.

Released: 14-Jul-2023 11:55 AM EDT
Gender, race and socioeconomic status are associated with comorbidity in people with HIV who smoke
Wolters Kluwer Health: Lippincott

High rates of smoking among people with HIV are associated with high rates of comorbid health problems – which are associated with characteristics including gender, race/ethnicity, and socioeconomic status, according to a study in the July issue of The Journal of the Association of Nurses in AIDS Care (JANAC). The official journal of the Association of Nurses in AIDS Care, JANAC is published in the Lippincott portfolio by Wolters Kluwer.

Newswise: RUSH and UChicago Medicine Expand Racial Health Equity Reporting Tool Nationally
Released: 14-Jul-2023 8:20 AM EDT
RUSH and UChicago Medicine Expand Racial Health Equity Reporting Tool Nationally
RUSH

Chicago health systems RUSH and UChicago Medicine are making available a free self-assessment tool that uses a race-conscious approach to help hospitals benchmark health equity efforts for all patients. Created after the COVID 19 pandemic revealed disproportionate racial and ethnic mortality rates, the effort is supported by a Commonwealth Fund grant and was piloted at hospitals across Illinois.

Released: 13-Jul-2023 4:50 PM EDT
Skin lightening products can be dangerous, but users don’t know risks
Northwestern University

Skin lightening is prevalent in the U.S. among skin of color individuals – particularly women – but the people who use those products don’t know the risks, reports a new Northwestern Medicine study.

Newswise: Mount Sinai Participates in $40 Million Multisite Study of Alzheimer’s Disease in Asian Americans and Asian Canadians
Released: 13-Jul-2023 12:55 PM EDT
Mount Sinai Participates in $40 Million Multisite Study of Alzheimer’s Disease in Asian Americans and Asian Canadians
Mount Sinai Health System

Study represents a major milestone toward health equity for underrepresented populations in Alzheimer’s disease research

Newswise: TTUHSC El Paso Professor Receives Grant for Research on Potential Breast Cancer Treatment
Released: 13-Jul-2023 12:00 PM EDT
TTUHSC El Paso Professor Receives Grant for Research on Potential Breast Cancer Treatment
Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center El Paso

Breast cancer is the second leading cause of cancer mortality in women and the primary cause of cancer death among Hispanic women, according to the National Cancer Institute. The Center of Emphasis in Cancer focuses on forms of the disease prevalent in our majority-Hispanic Borderplex, seeking new strategies for the prevention and treatment of the deadly disease.

Newswise: ‘Taboo’ & ‘Crazy:’ Researchers Examine Mental Health Stigmas on the Border
Released: 13-Jul-2023 4:00 AM EDT
‘Taboo’ & ‘Crazy:’ Researchers Examine Mental Health Stigmas on the Border
University of Texas at El Paso

Study on Hispanic mental health perspectives paves way for better treatment engagement

Newswise: Diversity in Cancer Research Internship Program Launched at Sylvester Comprehensive Cancer Center
Released: 12-Jul-2023 6:30 PM EDT
Diversity in Cancer Research Internship Program Launched at Sylvester Comprehensive Cancer Center
Sylvester Comprehensive Cancer Center

Dylan Thompson is used to feeling out of place. In high school, he was one of the only Black students in his advanced classes. When he started at the University of Miami, he again found himself as one of the only Black students in his pre-med classes. Relief came for him, though, in the form of the Diversity in Cancer Research Internship Program at Sylvester Comprehensive Cancer Center.

Released: 11-Jul-2023 11:55 AM EDT
Nurse researcher casts new light on bruise detection in patients with darker skin tones
Wolters Kluwer Health: Lippincott

A leading forensic nurse researcher has developed new approaches to detecting bruises in patients with darker skin tones – thus helping to overcome barriers to diagnosing injuries in patients of color, according to a special article on nurse innovators in the July issue of the American Journal of Nursing (AJN). The journal is published in the Lippincott portfolio by Wolters Kluwer.

Released: 11-Jul-2023 11:30 AM EDT
Largest study on racial differences in men with melanoma shows men with skin of color have lowest survival rates
American Academy of Dermatology

Melanoma, the most serious form of skin cancer, is highly treatable when detected early, but when the disease advances, it can lead to death. A new article published in the Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology reveals that men with melanoma — and particularly men with skin of color — are more likely to die than women with melanoma.



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