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Released: 12-Jul-2009 8:00 PM EDT
Study Finds Earliest Evidence of Memory Decline in Middle-Aged People at Genetic Risk for Alzheimer's Disease
Mayo Clinic

Memory lapses that occur with normal aging are a source of worry for many who fear Alzheimer's disease. Now a new Mayo Clinic-led study published in the July 16 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine suggests that the carriers of a common genetic risk factor for Alzheimer's disease begin to have memory declines in their mid-50s, far earlier than previously thought.

Released: 7-Jul-2009 3:45 PM EDT
Can Children Outgrow Chronic Daily Headache?
American Academy of Neurology (AAN)

Most children who suffer from chronic daily headache may outgrow the disabling condition, according to research published in the July 15, 2009, online issue of Neurology, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. Nearly 1.5 percent of middle school children are affected by chronic daily headache, which includes chronic migraines and tension-type headaches.

Released: 15-Jul-2009 2:35 PM EDT
Scientists Discover a New Mechanism Controlling Neuronal Migration
St. Jude Children's Research Hospital

The molecular machinery that helps brain cells migrate to their correct place in the developing brain has been identified by scientists at St. Jude Children's Research Hospital.

Newswise: Timing Is Everything: Growth Factor Keeps Brain Development on Track
Released: 13-Jul-2009 8:30 PM EDT
Timing Is Everything: Growth Factor Keeps Brain Development on Track
Salk Institute for Biological Studies

Just like a conductor cueing musicians in an orchestra, Fgf10, a member of the fibroblast growth factor (Ffg) family of morphogens, lets brain stem cells know that the moment to get to work has arrived, ensuring that they hit their first developmental milestone on time, report scientists at the Salk Institute for Biological Studies in the July 16, 2009, edition of the journal Neuron.

Released: 7-Jul-2009 4:40 PM EDT
Researchers Find Adult Brain Changes with Unsuspected Speed
McGovern Institute for Brain Research, Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT)

The human brain can adapt to changing demands even in adulthood, but MIT neuroscientists have now found evidence of it changing with unsuspected speed. Their findings suggest that the brain has a network of silent connections that underlie its plasticity.

Released: 7-Jul-2009 8:20 PM EDT
Study Continues to Refine Most Effective Methods to Predict Alzheimer's Disease
Mayo Clinic

A new Mayo Clinic study found that the clinical criteria for mild cognitive impairment is better at predicting who will develop Alzheimer's disease than a single memory test. This is one more piece of information to aid in the identification and early treatment of individuals most likely to develop Alzheimer's disease. This study will be presented at the Alzheimer's Association International Conference on Alzheimer's Disease on July 14 in Vienna.

Released: 13-Jul-2009 4:25 PM EDT
Researchers ID Brain-protecting Protein
Johns Hopkins Medicine

Johns Hopkins researchers have discovered a novel protein that can protect brain cells by interrupting a naturally occurring "stress cascade" resulting in cell death.

Released: 7-Jul-2009 2:30 PM EDT
White Matter Changes May Predict Dementia Risk
American Academy of Neurology (AAN)

Elderly people with no memory or thinking problems are more likely to later develop thinking problems if they have a growing amount of "brain rust," or small areas of brain damage, according to a study published in the July 14, 2009, print issue of Neurology, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology.

Released: 9-Jul-2009 5:00 PM EDT
Smoking Associated With More Rapid Progression of MS
JAMA - Journal of the American Medical Association

CHICAGO "“ Patients with multiple sclerosis who smoke appear to experience a more rapid progression of their disease, according to a report in the July issue of Archives of Neurology, one of the JAMA/Archives journals.

Released: 9-Jul-2009 5:00 PM EDT
Higher Education Level, Greater Disability Associated With Treatment Timing in Parkinson's Disease
JAMA - Journal of the American Medical Association

Individuals who have higher levels of education and who are more impaired by Parkinson's disease appear to require treatment for their symptoms earlier than do other patients, according to a report posted online today that will appear in the September print issue of Archives of Neurology, one of the JAMA/Archives journals.



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