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Newswise: MSU Technologies Lead to Better Survival, Bigger Catfish for Mississippi Producers
Released: 19-Feb-2019 3:05 PM EST
MSU Technologies Lead to Better Survival, Bigger Catfish for Mississippi Producers
Mississippi State University

Mississippi State-developed vaccination technologies are being commercialized to help the catfish industry save millions for the state that leads the nation in production.

Newswise:Video Embedded argonne-brandeis-university-researchers-examine-infectious-bacterium-s-natural-defenses
VIDEO
Released: 18-Jun-2015 8:05 AM EDT
Argonne, Brandeis University Researchers Examine Infectious Bacterium’s Natural Defenses
Argonne National Laboratory

As a spinoff from their research aimed at fighting a specific parasite, researchers at the U.S. Department of Energy’s Argonne National Laboratory and Brandeis University may have found a way around an infectious bacterium’s natural defenses.

Newswise: Unveiling the Ancient Climate of Mars
Released: 16-Jun-2015 5:05 PM EDT
Unveiling the Ancient Climate of Mars
Newswise

The high seas of Mars may never have existed. According to a new study that looks at two opposite climate scenarios of early Mars, a cold and icy planet billions of years ago better explains water drainage and erosion features seen on the planet today.

Newswise: University of Oklahoma Professor Named Recipient of Prestigious Department of Energy Lawrence Award
Released: 21-May-2015 12:05 PM EDT
University of Oklahoma Professor Named Recipient of Prestigious Department of Energy Lawrence Award
Department of Energy, Office of Science

Professor Jizhong Zhou will receive the U.S Department of Energy’s highest scientific award from U.S. Energy Secretary Ernest Moniz in a ceremony in Washington, D.C., later this year.

Released: 27-Apr-2015 3:05 PM EDT
Argonne Leadership Computing Facility Supercomputer Helps Identify Materials to Improve Fuel Production
Argonne National Laboratory

ALCF resources being used to demonstrate a predictive modeling capability that can help accelerate the discovery of new materials to improve biofuel and petroleum production

Released: 22-Apr-2015 10:05 AM EDT
Backache – a Matter of Mechanics
Empa, Swiss Federal Laboratories for Materials Science and Technology

Thanks to a collaboration with the Balgrist University Hospital and University of Pittsburgh, Empa is beginning to decode the mechanics of the lower vertebrae. Researchers would like be able to reveal how wear and tear comes about on vertebral bodies and spinal disks. This would also make choosing the appropriate therapy much easier.

17-Apr-2015 2:05 PM EDT
Deep National History of Immigration Predicts Wide Cultural Comfort Displaying Emotion
University of Wisconsin-Madison

People who live in countries built on centuries of migration from a wide range of other countries are more emotionally expressive than people in more insular cultures, according to research led by University of Wisconsin–Madison psychology Professor Paula Niedenthal.

Newswise: Nondestructive 3-D Imaging of Biological Cells with Sound
16-Apr-2015 2:05 PM EDT
Nondestructive 3-D Imaging of Biological Cells with Sound
American Institute of Physics (AIP)

In this week’s Applied Physics Letters, researchers from Thailand and Japan describe the first known demonstration of 3-D cell imaging using picosecond ultrasonics, and show that picosecond ultrasonics can achieve micron resolution of single cells, imaging their interiors in slices separated by 150 nanometers. This work is a proof-of-principle that may open the door to new ways of studying the physical properties of living cells by imaging them in vivo.

Newswise: Dark Energy Survey Creates Detailed Guide to Spotting Dark Matter in the Cosmos
Released: 13-Apr-2015 3:05 PM EDT
Dark Energy Survey Creates Detailed Guide to Spotting Dark Matter in the Cosmos
Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (Fermilab)

Scientists on the Dark Energy Survey have released the first in a series of dark matter maps of the cosmos. These maps, created with one of the world's most powerful digital cameras, are the largest contiguous maps created at this level of detail and will improve our understanding of dark matter's role in the formation of galaxies.

Released: 12-Mar-2015 8:05 AM EDT
The Effects of Integrating a Physiatrist into an Acute Stroke Team
Association of Academic Physiatrists (AAP)

A research team at Emory University presents new research at the 2015 AAP Annual Meeting in San Antonio that suggests that early rehabilitation as well as discharges to acute rehabilitation facilities post stroke can improve neurologic outcomes. The purpose of the study was to investigate the impact of introducing a physiatrist into an acute stroke team.

Released: 6-Mar-2015 8:30 AM EST
National Economy Is Best Predictor of Job Satisfaction
Journal of Occupational and Environmental Medicine

The national gross domestic product (GDP) is a stronger predictor of job satisfaction than workers' personal or job-related characteristics, reports the March Journal of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, official publication of the American College of Occupational and Environmental Medicine (ACOEM).

Released: 4-Mar-2015 1:05 AM EST
Research Uncovers Basis for Cadmium Toxicity
University of Adelaide

University of Adelaide research has uncovered how the metal cadmium, which is accumulating in the food chain, causes toxicity in living cells.

Newswise: Successful Cognitive Behavioral Therapy in Youth Leads to Decreased Thinking about Suicide
Released: 2-Mar-2015 3:05 PM EST
Successful Cognitive Behavioral Therapy in Youth Leads to Decreased Thinking about Suicide
Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania

Penn Medicine researchers found that patients who did not respond to cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) for anxiety in childhood had more chronic and enduring patterns of suicidal ideation at 7 to 19 years after treatment. This study adds to the literature that suggests that successful CBT for childhood anxiety confers long-term benefits. The complete study is available in the Journal of the American Academy of Child & Adolescent Psychiatry.

Newswise: Widely Used Food Additive Promotes Colitis,Obesity and Metabolic Syndrome, Research Shows
23-Feb-2015 1:00 PM EST
Widely Used Food Additive Promotes Colitis,Obesity and Metabolic Syndrome, Research Shows
Georgia State University

Emulsifiers, which are added to most processed foods to aid texture and extend shelf life, can alter the gut microbiota composition and localization to induce intestinal inflammation that promotes the development of inflammatory bowel disease and metabolic syndrome, new research shows.

Newswise: New Study Sheds Light on Cancer Stem Cell Regulation
26-Jan-2015 5:55 PM EST
New Study Sheds Light on Cancer Stem Cell Regulation
Sanford Burnham Prebys

Researchers identify signaling molecules in intestinal stem cells that can lead to tumors if left unregulated. The findings suggest a new approach to targeting intestinal cancers.

Newswise: Researchers Pinpoint Two Genes That Trigger Severest Form of Ovarian Cancer
26-Jan-2015 11:15 AM EST
Researchers Pinpoint Two Genes That Trigger Severest Form of Ovarian Cancer
University of North Carolina Health Care System

Researchers create first mouse model of ovarian clear cell carcinoma using data from human cancer genome atlas. They show how when the genes ARID1A and PIK2CA are mutated in specific ways, the result is ovarian cancer 100 percent of the time. They show that a known drug can suppress tumor growth.

Newswise: A First Peek Beneath the Surface of a Comet
22-Jan-2015 2:00 PM EST
A First Peek Beneath the Surface of a Comet
University of Massachusetts Amherst

In some of the first research findings to be published from the European Space Agency’s Rosetta Mission to the comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko, scientists report this week in Science on early measurements of the comet’s subsurface temperature and production of gas from the surface of its nucleus.

Newswise: How Does the Brain Adapt to the Restoration of Eyesight?
Released: 19-Jan-2015 8:00 AM EST
How Does the Brain Adapt to the Restoration of Eyesight?
Universite de Montreal

Recent scientific advances have meant that eyesight can be partially restored to those who previously would have been blind for life. However, scientists at the University of Montreal and the University of Trento have discovered that the rewiring of the senses that occurs in the brains of the long-term blind means that visual restoration may never be complete.

Released: 12-Jan-2015 4:00 PM EST
Leading Ohio Health Care Systems Launch a Collaborative Effort to Improve the Value of Health Care
ProMedica

Six of Ohio’s leading health systems have agreed to form a large-scale entity whose mission is to improve the value of health care services delivered to patients and communities throughout Ohio.

Released: 8-Jan-2015 10:45 AM EST
It’s All in a Good Night’s Sleep: How Quality of Sleep Impacts Academic Performance in Children
McGill University

A good night’s sleep is linked to better performance by schoolchildren in math and languages – subjects that are powerful predictors of later learning and academic success, according to a study by researchers at McGill University and the Douglas Mental Health University Institute in Montreal.

Newswise: The Health Warning Some Smokers Aren’t Hearing From Their Doctors
Released: 7-Jan-2015 7:50 AM EST
The Health Warning Some Smokers Aren’t Hearing From Their Doctors
Ohio State University Center for Clinical and Translational Science

While many smokers may make quitting part of their New Year’s resolution – a new study may give some yet another reason to stop – the negative impact cigarette smoke has on chronic wounds. Despite the fact that chronic wounds cost up to $25 billion to treat annually, healthcare providers often don’t discuss smoking with their chronic wound patients. New research explores the connection between non-healing wounds and smoking – and the missed opportunities to help patients understand how their habit is hurting their ability to heal.

Released: 31-Dec-2014 2:00 PM EST
Mind Over Matter: Can You Think Your Way to Strength?
American Physiological Society (APS)

Ohio University researchers find that regular mental imagery exercises help preserve arm strength during 4 weeks of immobilization. The article is published in the Journal of Neurophysiology and is highlighted as part of the APSselect program.


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