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Released: 14-Jan-2021 12:25 PM EST
MIND and Mediterranean diets associated with later onset of Parkinson's disease
University of British Columbia

A new study from UBC researchers suggests a strong correlation between following the MIND and Mediterranean diets and later onset of Parkinson's disease (PD). While researchers have long known of neuroprotective effects of the MIND diet for diseases like Alzheimer's and dementia, this study is the first to suggest a link between this diet and brain health for Parkinson's disease (PD).

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Released: 14-Jan-2021 12:25 PM EST
Scientists discover new 'spectacular' bat from West Africa
American Museum of Natural History

A group of scientists led by the American Museum of Natural History and Bat Conservation International have discovered a new species of a striking orange and black bat in a mountain range in West Africa.

Newswise: Reverse engineering 3D chromosome models for individual cells
Released: 14-Jan-2021 12:10 PM EST
Reverse engineering 3D chromosome models for individual cells
University of Illinois at Chicago

A new computational technique that uses heat map data to reverse engineer highly detailed models of chromosomes. Through this work, researchers have uncovered new information about the close spatial relationships that chromatin folding creates between genes that can be highly distant from one another along DNA strands.

Released: 14-Jan-2021 12:05 PM EST
Population density and virus strains will affect how regions can resume normal life
University of Wisconsin-Madison

As a new, apparently more transmissible version of the virus that causes COVID-19 has appeared in several countries, new research finds that the transmissibility of viral strains and the population density of a region will play big roles in how vaccination campaigns can help towns and cities return to more normal activities. The findings suggest that directing vaccines toward densely populated counties would help to interrupt transmission of the disease.

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Released: 14-Jan-2021 11:55 AM EST
Scientists are a step closer to developing 'smart' stem cells - made from human fat
University of New South Wales

A new type of stem cell - that is, a cell with regenerative abilities - could be closer on the horizon, a new study led by UNSW Sydney shows.

Released: 14-Jan-2021 11:45 AM EST
Fast food restaurant proximity likely doesn't affect children's weight
Oxford University Press

A new paper in Q Open finds that the availability of fast food restaurants on the route between children's houses and their schools does not affect children's weight.

Released: 14-Jan-2021 11:35 AM EST
Discrimination may increase risk of anxiety disorders regardless of genetics, study finds
Tufts University

Exposure to discrimination plays a significant role in the risk of developing anxiety and related disorders, even – in a first – after accounting for potential genetic risks, according to a multidisciplinary team of health researchers led by Tufts University and the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health.

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Released: 14-Jan-2021 11:30 AM EST
Human-induced climate change caused the northwestern Pacific warming record in August 2020
National Institute for Environmental Studies

August 2020 set new record high sea surface temperatures (SSTs) in the northwestern Pacific Ocean and around the Japan coasts.

Released: 14-Jan-2021 11:25 AM EST
Cancer Models Created by Mechanical Engineers Offer New Insight Into Tumor Growth
Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute (RPI)

In research published today in Integrative Biology, a team of engineers from Rensselaer developed an in vitro — in the lab — lymphatic vessel model to study the growth of tumor emboli, collections of tumor cells within vessels that are often associated with increased metastasis and tumor recurrence.

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Released: 14-Jan-2021 11:15 AM EST
How the brain paralyzes you while you sleep
University of Tsukuba

We laugh when we see Homer Simpson falling asleep while driving, while in church, and while even operating the nuclear reactor.

Released: 14-Jan-2021 11:10 AM EST
Neither ‘meniscal’ nor ‘mechanical’ symptoms predict findings on knee arthroscopy
Wolters Kluwer Health: Lippincott

Orthopaedic surgeons have traditionally been taught that certain types of knee symptoms indicate damage to specialized structures called the menisci. But these “meniscal” and “mechanical” symptoms do not reflect what surgeons will find at knee arthroscopy, reports a study in The Journal of Bone & Joint Surgery. The journal is published in the Lippincott portfolio in partnership with Wolters Kluwer.

13-Jan-2021 12:05 PM EST
Study shows sharp decline in cancer screenings and diagnoses during the first COVID-19 surge
Dana-Farber Cancer Institute

In one of the first studies to examine the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on cancer diagnoses, researchers at Dana-Farber/Brigham and Women’s Cancer Center document a substantial decline in cancer and precancer diagnoses at the Northeast’s largest health care system during the first peak of the pandemic because of a drop in the number of cancer screening tests performed.

12-Jan-2021 3:05 PM EST
Cardiac Rehabilitation is Underused Across the Country. One Simple Change Could Fix That.
Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania

Making doctors opt out from prescribing cardiac rehabilitation instead of opting in increased referrals by roughly 70 percent

12-Jan-2021 11:00 AM EST
Scientists Take Important Step Toward Using Retinal Cell Transplants to Treat Blindness
Mount Sinai Health System

Retinal cells derived from a cadaver human eye survived when transplanted into the eyes of primate models, an important advance in the development of cell therapy to treat blindness, according to a study published on January 14 in Stem Cell Reports.

Newswise: New method makes better predictions of material properties using low quality data
11-Jan-2021 4:30 PM EST
New method makes better predictions of material properties using low quality data
University of California San Diego

By combining large amounts of low-fidelity data with smaller quantities of high-fidelity data, nanoengineers at UC San Diego have developed a machine learning method to more accurately predict the properties of new materials including, for the first time, disordered materials.

Released: 14-Jan-2021 10:50 AM EST
The Richer You are, The More Likely You’ll Social Distance, Study Finds
Johns Hopkins University

The higher a person’s income, the more likely they were to protect themselves at the early stages of the Covid-19 pandemic in the United States, Johns Hopkins University economists find. When it comes to adopting behaviors including social distancing and mask wearing, the team detected a striking link to their financial well-being. People who made around $230,000 a year were as much as 54% more likely to increase these types of self-protective behaviors compared to people making about $13,000.

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Released: 14-Jan-2021 10:35 AM EST
Scientists discover the secret of Galápagos' rich ecosystem
University of Southampton

New research has unlocked the mystery of how the Galápagos Islands, a rocky, volcanic outcrop, with only modest rainfall and vegetation, is able to sustain its unique wildlife habitats.

Newswise: New Classification Marks Paradigm Shift in how Conservationists Tackle Climate Change
Released: 14-Jan-2021 10:15 AM EST
New Classification Marks Paradigm Shift in how Conservationists Tackle Climate Change
Wildlife Conservation Society

A new study introduces a classification called Resistance-Resilience-Transformation (RRT) that enables the assessment of whether and to what extent a management shift toward transformative action is occurring in conservation.

Newswise: Behaviors Surrounding Oral Sex May Increase HPV-Related Cancer Risk
Released: 14-Jan-2021 10:10 AM EST
Behaviors Surrounding Oral Sex May Increase HPV-Related Cancer Risk
Johns Hopkins Medicine

A wide breadth of behaviors surrounding oral sex may affect the risk of oral HPV infection and of a virus-associated head and neck cancer that can be spread through this route, a new study led by researchers at the Johns Hopkins Kimmel Cancer Center suggests. These findings add nuance to the connection between oral sex and oropharyngeal cancer — tumors that occur in the mouth and throat — and could help inform research and public health efforts aimed at preventing this disease.

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Embargo will expire: 19-Jan-2021 11:00 AM EST Released to reporters: 14-Jan-2021 10:00 AM EST

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12-Jan-2021 1:55 PM EST
Restricting Malt Liquor Sales is Linked to Reductions in Neighborhood Crime
Research Society on Alcoholism

Restricting the sale of malt liquor beer can help reduce crime in some communities, according to a new study. Malt liquor beer — high in alcohol content, low cost, and widely sold in liquor stores and convenience stores — is linked to heavy drinking, public inebriation, disorderly conduct, drug activity and other crimes. Consequently, since the 1990s, some cities have restricted its sale. In Washington state, certain urban neighborhoods were designated Alcohol Impact Areas and targeted with policies including restrictions on sales of malt liquor and similar products. Unpublished evaluations of these interventions have suggested positive social and health effects, but the research on crime impacts has been limited, with mixed findings. The study in Alcoholism: Clinical and Experimental Research found that malt liquor sales restrictions are associated with declining urban crime.

12-Jan-2021 1:45 PM EST
People Feeling Angry Are Willing to Purchase Alcohol at Higher Prices But May Not Know It
Research Society on Alcoholism

People who’ve been provoked to anger are willing to purchase alcohol at higher prices, but may not be aware of their increased urge to drink, according to a new study. Anger, hostility, and aggression are known to relate to drinking, with anger a risk factor for heavy alcohol use. Building on previous studies that have deliberately manipulated emotional states to explore their effects on substance use, researchers at Wayne State University, Michigan, designed an experiment that could help clarify whether anger can motivate people to drink . For the study in Alcoholism: Clinical and Experimental Research, the investigators sought to induce anger in participants and measure the effect of that anger on the desire to drink. They used two measures of drinking urges: self-reported alcohol craving and a behavioral task that assesses people’s motivation to drink.

Newswise: Researchers Link Cellular Transport Pathway to Aggressive Brain Cancer
7-Jan-2021 9:00 AM EST
Researchers Link Cellular Transport Pathway to Aggressive Brain Cancer
The Rockefeller University Press

Researchers at McGill University have identified a new cellular pathway that limits the growth and spread of brain tumors by controlling the recycling of cell surface receptor proteins. The study, which will be published January 14 in the Journal of Cell Biology (JCB), suggests that the pathway, which involves a protein called Rab35, is defective in many patients with glioblastoma and that restoring Rab35’s activity could be a new therapeutic strategy for this deadly form of brain cancer.

Released: 14-Jan-2021 9:55 AM EST
Males of all ages more affected by COVID-19 than females, study finds
PLOS

Males are more likely to test positive for COVID-19, more likely to have complications and more likely to die from the virus than females, independent of age, according to a new study published this week in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Farhaan Vahidy of Houston Methodist Research Institute, US, and colleagues.

Newswise: A Rift in the Retina May Help Repair the Optic Nerve
Released: 14-Jan-2021 9:00 AM EST
A Rift in the Retina May Help Repair the Optic Nerve
Johns Hopkins Medicine

In experiments in mouse tissues and human cells, Johns Hopkins Medicine researchers say they have found that removing a membrane that lines the back of the eye may improve the success rate for regrowing nerve cells damaged by blinding diseases. The findings are specifically aimed at discovering new ways to reverse vision loss caused by glaucoma and other diseases that affect the optic nerve, the information highway from the eye to the brain.

Released: 14-Jan-2021 9:00 AM EST
Moffitt Researchers Discover Biochemical Pathway That Protects Cells from Ferroptosis Cell Death
Moffitt Cancer Center

In an article published in Cell Metabolism, Moffitt Cancer Center researchers report on a newly discovered biochemical pathway that protects cells from a type of cell death called ferroptosis.

12-Jan-2021 12:50 PM EST
Sexual harassment claims by less feminine women perceived as less credible
American Psychological Association (APA)

Women who do not fit female stereotypes are less likely to be seen as victims of sexual harassment, and if they claim they were harassed, they are less likely to be believed, according to research published by the American Psychological Association.

Newswise: Sexual harassment claims considered more credible if made by ‘prototypical’ women, study finds
11-Jan-2021 3:05 PM EST
Sexual harassment claims considered more credible if made by ‘prototypical’ women, study finds
University of Washington

A new UW study reveals people's perceptions that sexual harassment primarily affects young, feminine and conventionally attractive women. Women who fall outside that prototype not only are perceived as unharmed by harassment, but also have a harder time convincing others that they have been harassed.

Newswise:Video Embedded greenland-melting-likely-increased-by-bacteria-in-sediment
VIDEO
Released: 14-Jan-2021 8:45 AM EST
Greenland Melting Likely Increased by Bacteria in Sediment
Rutgers University-New Brunswick

Bacteria are likely triggering greater melting on the Greenland ice sheet, possibly increasing the island’s contribution to sea-level rise, according to Rutgers scientists. That’s because the microbes cause sunlight-absorbing sediment to clump together and accumulate in the meltwater streams, according to a Rutgers-led study – the first of its kind – in the journal Geophysical Research Letters. The findings can be incorporated in climate models, leading to more accurate predictions of melting, scientists say.

Newswise: New way to control electrical charge in 2D materials: Put a flake on it
Released: 14-Jan-2021 8:05 AM EST
New way to control electrical charge in 2D materials: Put a flake on it
Washington University in St. Louis

Physicists at Washington University in St. Louis have discovered how to locally add electrical charge to an atomically thin graphene device by layering flakes of another thin material, alpha-RuCl3, on top of it. A paper published with scientists at Boston College describes the charge transfer process in detail. Gaining control of the flow of electrical current through atomically thin materials is important to potential future applications in photovoltaics or computing.

Newswise: Spectacular fossil discovery: 150 million-year-old shark was one of the largest of its time
Released: 14-Jan-2021 8:05 AM EST
Spectacular fossil discovery: 150 million-year-old shark was one of the largest of its time
University of Vienna

In a new study, an international research team led by Sebastian Stumpf from the University of Vienna describes an exceptionally well-preserved skeleton of the ancient shark Asteracanthus. This extremely rare fossil find comes from the famous Solnhofen limestones in Bavaria, which was formed in a tropical-subtropical lagoon landscape during the Late Jurassic, about 150 million years ago.

Newswise: NUS scientists find new mechanism of cancer formation
Released: 14-Jan-2021 8:05 AM EST
NUS scientists find new mechanism of cancer formation
National University of Singapore

A team of scientists at the National University of Singapore (NUS), led by Dr Polly Leilei Chen from the Cancer Science Institute of Singapore and Yong Loo Lin School of Medicine at NUS, has discovered a previously unknown mechanism of cancer formation, the understanding of which may lead to more effective treatment. They discover that doing nothing to the DNA code of the COPA gene can promote cancer.

Newswise: A Climate in Crisis Calls for Investment in Direct Air Capture, New Research Finds
13-Jan-2021 7:00 PM EST
A Climate in Crisis Calls for Investment in Direct Air Capture, New Research Finds
University of California San Diego

New research from the University of California San Diego explores one possible mode of response to a climate in crisis: a massively funded program to deploy direct air capture (DAC) systems that remove CO2 directly from the ambient air and sequester it safely underground.

Newswise: Low cost chlorine dispensing device improves tap water safety in low-resource regions
11-Jan-2021 1:05 PM EST
Low cost chlorine dispensing device improves tap water safety in low-resource regions
Tufts University

Engineers have developed an inexpensive chlorine dispensing device that improves the safety of drinking water in remote and low resource regions at the point of collection. It requires no electricity and very little maintenance, and provides a quick and easy way to eliminate water borne pathogens.

Newswise: Climate Change is Hurting Children’s Diets, Global Study Finds
11-Jan-2021 7:55 AM EST
Climate Change is Hurting Children’s Diets, Global Study Finds
University of Vermont

A first-of-its-kind, international study of 107,000 children finds that higher temperatures are an equal or even greater contributor to child malnutrition than the traditional culprits of poverty, inadequate sanitation, and poor education. The 19-nation study is the largest investigation to date of the relationship between our changing climate and children's diet diversity. Of the six regions examined--in Asia, Africa, and Central and South America--five had significant reductions in diet diversity associated with higher temperatures.

Newswise: New Combination Drug Therapy Offers Hope Against Methamphetamine Addiction
Released: 13-Jan-2021 5:05 PM EST
New Combination Drug Therapy Offers Hope Against Methamphetamine Addiction
UT Southwestern Medical Center

DALLAS – Jan. 13, 2021 – A new treatment that combines two existing medications may provide long-sought relief for many battling debilitating methamphetamine use disorder, according to a study to be published tomorrow in The New England Journal of Medicine.

Newswise:Video Embedded doubling-the-number-of-known-gravitational-lenses
VIDEO
Released: 13-Jan-2021 4:55 PM EST
Doubling the Number of Known Gravitational Lenses
NSF’s National Optical-Infrared Astronomy Research Laboratory

Data from the DESI (Dark Energy Spectroscopic Instrument) Legacy Imaging Surveys have revealed over 1200 new gravitational lenses, approximately doubling the number of known lenses. Discovered using machine learning trained on real data, these warped and stretched images of distant galaxies provide astronomers with a flood of new targets with which to measure fundamental properties of the Universe such as the Hubble constant, which describes the expanding Universe.

Newswise:Video Embedded mapping-our-sun-s-backyard
VIDEO
Released: 13-Jan-2021 4:35 PM EST
Mapping Our Sun’s Backyard
NSF’s National Optical-Infrared Astronomy Research Laboratory

Astronomers have curated the most complete list of nearby brown dwarfs to date thanks to discoveries made by thousands of volunteers participating in the Backyard Worlds citizen science project. The list and 3D map of 525 brown dwarfs — including 38 reported for the first time — incorporate observations from a host of astronomical instruments including several NOIRLab facilities. The results confirm that the Sun’s neighborhood appears surprisingly diverse relative to other parts of the Milky Way Galaxy.

8-Jan-2021 4:30 PM EST
Memory May Be Preserved in Condition with Brain Changes Similar to Alzheimer’s Disease
American Academy of Neurology (AAN)

Primary progressive aphasia is a rare neurodegenerative condition characterized by prominent language problems that worsen over time. About 40% of people with the condition have underlying Alzheimer’s disease. But a new study has found that people with the condition may not develop the memory problems associated with Alzheimer’s disease. The study is published in the January 13, 2021, online issue of Neurology®, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology.

Released: 13-Jan-2021 3:35 PM EST
KU studies show breakfast can improve basketball shooting performance
University of Kansas

Parents around the world have long told us that breakfast is the most important meal of the day. Soon, basketball coaches may join them.

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Released: 13-Jan-2021 3:25 PM EST
Is the COVID-19 vaccine safe for nursing mothers?
Mary Ann Liebert

The Academy of Breastfeeding Medicine (ABM) does not recommend cessation of breastfeeding for individuals who are vaccinated against COVID-19.

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Released: 13-Jan-2021 3:20 PM EST
New study suggests that college campuses are COVID-19 superspreaders
Taylor & Francis

College campuses are at risk of becoming COVID-19 superspreaders for their entire county, according to a new vast study which shows the striking danger of the first two weeks of school in particular.

Released: 13-Jan-2021 3:15 PM EST
Families' remote learning experience during lockdown more positive than widely believed
Taylor & Francis

The remote learning experience of parents who had their children at home in Spring 2020, as schools across the US closed during the United States' COVID-19 lockdown, was more positive than widely believed.

access_time Embargo lifts in 2 days
Embargo will expire: 19-Jan-2021 11:00 AM EST Released to reporters: 13-Jan-2021 3:05 PM EST

A reporter's PressPass is required to access this story until the embargo expires on 19-Jan-2021 11:00 AM EST The Newswise PressPass gives verified journalists access to embargoed stories. Please log in to complete a presspass application. If you have not yet registered, please Register. When you fill out the registration form, please identify yourself as a reporter in order to advance to the presspass application form.

Newswise: Research: EU Model Overestimates Environmental Exposure of Key Surfactant
Released: 13-Jan-2021 3:00 PM EST
Research: EU Model Overestimates Environmental Exposure of Key Surfactant
American Cleaning Institute

A European Union model used to predict the environmental exposure of a major detergent ingredient is overly conservative and “significantly overestimates” effluent concentrations, new research shows. A study co-authored by the American Cleaning Institute (ACI), “Comparing the European Union System for the Evaluation of Substances (EUSES) environmental exposure calculations with monitoring data for alkyl sulphate surfactants,” is now available in the journal Environmental Sciences Europe.

Released: 13-Jan-2021 2:55 PM EST
High insulin levels during childhood a risk for mental health problems in adulthood, study suggests
University of Cambridge

Researchers have shown that the link between physical and mental illness is closer than previously thought. Certain changes in physical health, which are detectable in childhood, are linked with the development of mental illness in adulthood.

Released: 13-Jan-2021 2:50 PM EST
Can menopause be blamed for increased forgetfulness and lack of attention?
North American Menopause Society (NAMS)

If you're a bit more forgetful or having more difficulty processing complex concepts than in the past, the problem may be your menopause stage.

Released: 13-Jan-2021 2:40 PM EST
Could we harness energy from black holes?
Columbia University

A remarkable prediction of Einstein's theory of general relativity--the theory that connects space, time, and gravity--is that rotating black holes have enormous amounts of energy available to be tapped.

Released: 13-Jan-2021 2:30 PM EST
Is it Safe to Perform CPR During the COVID-19 Pandemic?
Michigan Medicine - University of Michigan

A new study analyzes the potential transmission risk of airborne respiratory pathogens during bystander-initiated cardiopulmonary resuscitation, or CPR.


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