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Released: 18-Aug-2022 11:25 AM EDT
No One-Size-Fits-All Artificial Intelligence Approach Works for Prevention, Diagnosis or Treatment Using Precision Medicine
Rutgers University-New Brunswick

Rutgers study is one of the first to examine competing AI algorithms and software in genomics, especially when using gene-expression and variant data.

Newswise: Can the protein that defeats metabolic diseases conquer dementia?
Released: 18-Aug-2022 11:20 AM EDT
Can the protein that defeats metabolic diseases conquer dementia?
Pohang University of Science and Technology (POSTECH)

In the recent popular Korean TV series “The Light in Your Eyes,” many viewers emphasized with the main character suffering from Alzheimer’s disease.

Newswise: Exploring Quantum Electron Highways with Laser Light
Released: 18-Aug-2022 11:15 AM EDT
Exploring Quantum Electron Highways with Laser Light
SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory

Hitting a topological insulator with powerful pulses of circularly polarized laser light reveals what its electrons are doing – and how its surface switches from being an electron highway to an electron roadblock.

Released: 18-Aug-2022 11:15 AM EDT
Food production impacting Earth and its natural processes
Australian National University

Food production is already one of the biggest stressors to our planet, but it’s made substantially more challenging by the interaction of Earth system processes, according to new research.

Released: 18-Aug-2022 11:10 AM EDT
Complex patterns: building a bridge from the large to the small
Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität München (Munich)

A new theory enables the simulation of complex pattern formation in biological systems across different spatial and temporal scales.

Released: 18-Aug-2022 11:05 AM EDT
Quicker palliative care referrals needed to support severely ill COVID patients
King's College London

Severe breathlessness in COVID patients with co-morbidities should be used as a signal for quicker referral for palliative care to help manage their symptoms sooner, new research has found.

Released: 18-Aug-2022 11:05 AM EDT
Report outlines most common symptoms of 6 cardiovascular diseases
American Heart Association (AHA)

A review of the latest research highlights the most reported symptoms of various cardiovascular diseases (CVDs), noting that men and women often experience different symptoms, according to a new American Heart Association scientific statement published today in the Association’s flagship peer-reviewed journal, Circulation.

18-Aug-2022 9:30 AM EDT
Climate change threatens food supply chains with cascading impacts on diet quality, income – new modelling shows
University of Sydney

Modelling shows climate change and extreme weather events will impact food supply chains, with adverse effects on income, food and nutrient availability.

Newswise: Study of More Than 150,000 People Identifies Genes Strongly Linked to Autism and Neurodevelopmental Disorders
17-Aug-2022 12:10 PM EDT
Study of More Than 150,000 People Identifies Genes Strongly Linked to Autism and Neurodevelopmental Disorders
Mount Sinai Health System

Total of 252 genes cited, providing insights on how mutations might result in developmental disorder and potential targets for treatment

Released: 18-Aug-2022 10:45 AM EDT
UBC researchers discover ‘weak spot’ across major COVID-19 variants
University of British Columbia

Researchers at the University of British Columbia have discovered a key vulnerability across all major variants of the SARS-CoV-2 virus, including the recently emerged BA.1 and BA.2 Omicron subvariants.

Released: 18-Aug-2022 10:30 AM EDT
A warming planet could mess with our sleep – and make us more vulnerable to infectious disease
University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA), Health Sciences

A warming planet doesn’t just mean more people may find it harder to get quality sleep: There is also evidence suggesting that sleep disturbance could make it harder for the body to fend off infection, a UCLA professor writes.

Newswise: Scientists Thought They Knew How the Nose ‘Knows,’ New Research Suggests Otherwise
Released: 18-Aug-2022 10:25 AM EDT
Scientists Thought They Knew How the Nose ‘Knows,’ New Research Suggests Otherwise
Johns Hopkins Medicine

Johns Hopkins Medicine researchers say they have evidence to potentially overturn a prevailing belief in a type of important signaling within cells. The mainstream idea is that a single protein receptor molecule — a kind of flag on the cell surface — spurs the activity of up to hundreds of downstream protein molecules to produce a signal.

Newswise: CRISPR-based Technology Targets Global Crop Pest
15-Aug-2022 6:05 PM EDT
CRISPR-based Technology Targets Global Crop Pest
University of California San Diego

UC San Diego scientists have developed a technology that uses CRISPR genetic editing in Drosophila suzukii, the invasive fruit fly responsible for millions of dollars in fruit crop damage.

Newswise: As Oceans Warm, Snapping Shrimp Sound a Warning
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Released: 18-Aug-2022 9:45 AM EDT
As Oceans Warm, Snapping Shrimp Sound a Warning
Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution

Research published by Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI) scientists today in Frontiers in Marine Science confirmed their previous observations that rising temperatures increase the sound of snapping shrimp, a tiny crustacean found in temperate and tropical coastal marine environments around the world.

Newswise: New Transitional Care Clinical Pathway Improves Health Equity
17-Aug-2022 3:00 PM EDT
New Transitional Care Clinical Pathway Improves Health Equity
University of Pennsylvania School of Nursing

People with multiple chronic conditions require complex care management and often experience significant challenges when transitioning from hospital to home. This is especially true for people insured by Medicaid who are disproportionately Black, Indigenous, People of Color (BIPOC) and experience higher chronic disease burdens and adverse outcomes following hospitalization. For them, comprehensive transitional care support is a paramount, yet often absent aspect of care delivery that may result in health inequities.

Newswise:Video Embedded study-first-to-explore-walking-sharks-on-the-move-in-early-life-stages
VIDEO
Released: 18-Aug-2022 8:30 AM EDT
Study First to Explore ‘Walking’ Sharks on the Move in Early Life Stages
Florida Atlantic University

A newly-discovered walking shark that breaks all of the rules for survival is the focus of a first-of-its-kind study that examined differences in walking and swimming in neonate (newly-hatched) and juvenile walking sharks. Despite dissimilarities in body shapes – neonates have bulging bellies and juveniles are slender – the three aquatic gaits they use (slow-to-medium walking, fast-walking and swimming) did not differ. Kinematics between neonate and juvenile epaulette sharks did not alter during development.

Released: 18-Aug-2022 7:50 AM EDT
Key Mechanisms of Airway Relaxation in Asthma Revealed in New Study
University Hospitals Cleveland Medical Center

Many therapeutics for asthma and other obstructive lung diseases target the β2-adrenergic receptor (β2AR), a G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) that rapidly supports airway relaxation when stimulated. Yet, overuse of these agents is associated with adverse health outcomes, including death, which has limited their utility as frontline therapies. Now, a mouse model study published in today’s issue of Molecular Cell, from investigators at University Hospitals (UH) and Case Western Reserve University, identifies a novel strategy to isolate the beneficial effects of β2AR stimulation. This suggests a new therapeutic approach to airway diseases as well as numerous other conditions involving the aberrant function of GPCRs.

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This news release is embargoed until 21-Aug-2022 10:00 AM EDT Released to reporters: 18-Aug-2022 5:05 AM EDT

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Released: 18-Aug-2022 5:05 AM EDT
Pathway uncovered for greatest lupus genetic risk factor, study shows
Michigan Medicine - University of Michigan

Researchers at Michigan Medicine have uncovered the enigmatic mechanism that genetically predisposes people to the worst effects of the most typical form of lupus, a study suggests. Researchers say the findings could potentially facilitate the discovery of safe, simple and effective treatments.

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This news release is embargoed until 22-Aug-2022 11:00 AM EDT Released to reporters: 18-Aug-2022 5:00 AM EDT

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Newswise: Fast-Growing Poplars Can Release Land for Food Production
Released: 17-Aug-2022 5:20 PM EDT
Fast-Growing Poplars Can Release Land for Food Production
Stockholm University

Researchers at Stockholm University and the Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences have developed a novel value chain for production of textile and bio-fuel from fast-growing poplars.

Newswise: Sleeping Giant Could End Deep Ocean Life
Released: 17-Aug-2022 5:15 PM EDT
Sleeping Giant Could End Deep Ocean Life
University of California, Riverside

A previously overlooked factor — the position of continents — helps fill Earth’s oceans with life-supporting oxygen. Continental movement could ultimately have the opposite effect, killing most deep ocean creatures.

Newswise: New Method Detects Gut Microbes That Activate Immune Cells
Released: 17-Aug-2022 5:05 PM EDT
New Method Detects Gut Microbes That Activate Immune Cells
Cedars-Sinai

Cedars-Sinai investigators have developed a method to help identify which human gut microbes are most likely to contribute to a slew of inflammatory diseases like obesity, liver disease, inflammatory bowel disease, cancer and some neurological diseases.

12-Aug-2022 10:05 AM EDT
Study reveals sex differences in age-related loss of kidney function
American Society of Nephrology (ASN)

Among healthy middle-aged adults in northern Europe, women tended to have lower kidney function than men, but men’s kidney function subsequently declined at a faster rate during aging.

Newswise: Snow research fills gap in understanding Arctic climate
Released: 17-Aug-2022 4:55 PM EDT
Snow research fills gap in understanding Arctic climate
Los Alamos National Laboratory

Comprehensive data from several seasons of field research in the Alaskan Arctic will address uncertainties in Earth-system and climate-change models about snow cover across the region and its impacts on water and the environment.

Newswise: Floating ‘Artificial Leaves’ Ride the Wave of Clean Fuel Production
Released: 17-Aug-2022 4:40 PM EDT
Floating ‘Artificial Leaves’ Ride the Wave of Clean Fuel Production
University of Cambridge

Researchers have developed floating ‘artificial leaves’ that generate clean fuels from sunlight and water, and could eventually operate on a large scale at sea.

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This news release is embargoed until 22-Aug-2022 11:00 AM EDT Released to reporters: 17-Aug-2022 4:35 PM EDT

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Newswise: How Environmental Changes Affect the Shapes of RNA in Living Cells
Released: 17-Aug-2022 4:30 PM EDT
How Environmental Changes Affect the Shapes of RNA in Living Cells
John Innes Centre

The impact of environmental conditions on the dynamic structures of RNAs in living cells has been revealed by innovative technology developed by researchers at the John Innes Centre.

Newswise:Video Embedded new-3d-model-shows-megalodon-could-eat-prey-the-size-of-entire-killer-whales
VIDEO
Released: 17-Aug-2022 4:15 PM EDT
New 3D Model Shows: Megalodon Could Eat Prey the Size of Entire Killer Whales
University of Zurich

The reconstructed megadolon (Otodus megalodon) was 16 meters long and weighed over 61 tons. It was estimated that it could swim at around 1.4 meters per second, require over 98,000 kilo calories every day and have stomach volume of almost 10,000 liters.

Released: 17-Aug-2022 4:05 PM EDT
Food Safety Organizations Team Up to Strengthen Research, Education and Protections
Institute for the Advancement of Food and Nutrition Sciences

IAFNS and IAFP establish new memorandum of understanding to strengthen collaboration on food safety issues.

11-Aug-2022 4:10 PM EDT
Pregnant Women with Epilepsy Have More Depression, Anxiety Symptoms
American Academy of Neurology (AAN)

Pregnant women with epilepsy have more symptoms of depression and anxiety during pregnancy and postpartum than pregnant women who do not have epilepsy or women with epilepsy who are not pregnant, according to a study published in the August 17, 2022, online issue of Neurology®, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology.

Newswise: Climate-Resilient Breadfruit Might Be the Food of the Future
Released: 17-Aug-2022 3:30 PM EDT
Climate-Resilient Breadfruit Might Be the Food of the Future
Northwestern University

In the face of climate change, breadfruit soon might come to a dinner plate near you. While researchers predict that climate change will have an adverse effect on most staple crops, including rice, corn and soybeans, a new Northwestern University study finds that breadfruit — a starchy tree fruit native to the Pacific islands — will be relatively unaffected.

Newswise: Lungless Salamanders Develop Lungs as Embryos Despite Lung Loss in Adults for Millions of Years
Released: 17-Aug-2022 3:05 PM EDT
Lungless Salamanders Develop Lungs as Embryos Despite Lung Loss in Adults for Millions of Years
Harvard University, Department of Organismic and Evolutionary Biology

Lungs are essential to many vertebrates including humans. However, four living amphibian clades have independently eliminated pulmonary respiration and lack lungs, breathing primarily through their wet skin. Little is known of the developmental basis of lung loss in these clades.

Newswise: Frogs Use Brains or Camouflage to Evade Predators
Released: 17-Aug-2022 3:00 PM EDT
Frogs Use Brains or Camouflage to Evade Predators
University of Zurich

Throughout evolution, prey animals have adopted a range of strategies to evade their predators. But these oftentimes elaborate strategies come at a cost.

Newswise: Reduced myocardial blood flow is new clue in how COVID-19 is impacting the heart
Released: 17-Aug-2022 2:45 PM EDT
Reduced myocardial blood flow is new clue in how COVID-19 is impacting the heart
Houston Methodist

Patients with prior COVID may be twice as likely to have unhealthy endothelial cells that line the inside of the heart and blood vessels, according to newly published research from Houston Methodist. This finding offers a new clue in understanding COVID-19’s impact on cardiovascular health.

Newswise: Why We Fit A Mini Brain with a Mini Cap
14-Aug-2022 2:05 PM EDT
Why We Fit A Mini Brain with a Mini Cap
Johns Hopkins University

It could be the world’s tiniest EEG electrode cap, created to measure activity in a brain model the size of a pen dot. Its designers expect the device to lead to better understanding of neural disorders and how potentially dangerous chemicals affect the brain. This engineering feat, led by Johns Hopkins University researchers and detailed today in Science Advances, expands what researchers can accomplish with organoids, including mini brains—the lab-grown balls of human cells that mimic some of a brain’s structure and functionality.

Newswise: Big Data in the ER
Released: 17-Aug-2022 1:40 PM EDT
Big Data in the ER
Osaka University

Researchers at Osaka University use machine learning methods on a large dataset of trauma patients to determine the factors that correlate with survival, which may significantly improve triage and rapid treatment procedures.

   
Released: 17-Aug-2022 1:20 PM EDT
Mars Model Provides Method for Landing Humans on Red Planet
Australian National University

A mathematical model developed by space medicine experts from The Australian National University (ANU) could be used to predict whether an astronaut can safely travel to Mars and fulfil their mission duties upon stepping foot on the Red Planet.

Released: 17-Aug-2022 1:15 PM EDT
Preschoolers with Larger Vocabulary Before They Begin Education, Perform Better in Class – Study Shows
Taylor & Francis

Children who enter preschool with good vocabulary and attention skills do better in class, according to a study published in the peer-reviewed journal Early Education and Development. The findings based on 900 four-year-olds from eight US states show how a child’s ability to engage with teachers and peers is affected by the range of words they know.

Newswise: International team determines structure of a key player in antibiotic resistance
Released: 17-Aug-2022 1:05 PM EDT
International team determines structure of a key player in antibiotic resistance
UT Southwestern Medical Center

With antibiotic-resistant bacteria on the rise, scientists have been searching for ways to shut down the Type IV secretion system (T4SS), a protein complex on the outer envelope of bacterial cells that helps them to exchange DNA with neighboring bacteria and resist antibiotics.

Newswise: Could Blood Marker Predict the Risk of Osteoporotic Hip Fracture in Men?
Released: 17-Aug-2022 1:00 PM EDT
Could Blood Marker Predict the Risk of Osteoporotic Hip Fracture in Men?
Wiley

Bone health requires a balanced activity of various bone cell types including bone-forming osteoblasts and bone-resorbing osteoclasts. Osteoporosis occurs when osteoclasts dominate without adequate bone formation to compensate.

Newswise: Research Method Predicts a Region’s Likelihood of Having Fish with Toxic Levels of Methylmercury
Released: 17-Aug-2022 12:50 PM EDT
Research Method Predicts a Region’s Likelihood of Having Fish with Toxic Levels of Methylmercury
Wiley

Consuming methylmercury-contaminated fish poses a hazard to human health. New research published in Environmental Toxicology and Chemistry may help environmental resource management officials predict which regions are likely to have fish with high concentrations of this toxin, without the need for extensive testing.

Newswise: How Young Chickens Play Can Indicate How They Feel
Released: 17-Aug-2022 12:45 PM EDT
How Young Chickens Play Can Indicate How They Feel
Linkoping University

It is common for young animals, in particular mammals, to play. Researchers at Linköping University (LiU), Sweden, have for the first time mapped the development of play in young chickens. The results show that the young chickens spend lots of time playing in different ways – just like puppies and kittens.

Released: 17-Aug-2022 12:35 PM EDT
Smartphone Video Motion Analysis Detected Narrowed Neck Arteries That May Lead to Stroke
American Heart Association (AHA)

Motion analysis of video recorded on a smartphone accurately detected narrowed arteries in the neck, which are a risk factor for stroke, according to new research published today in the Journal of the American Heart Association, an open access, peer-reviewed journal of the American Heart Association.

Newswise: Circular Economy to Boost the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development
Released: 17-Aug-2022 12:05 PM EDT
Circular Economy to Boost the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development
Tsinghua University Press

Circular economy is a brilliant concept that has found its way not only in elevating various aspects of our lives but also in solidifying future plans and goals for a sustainable society. In that sense, it also has high potential in achieving United Nations 2030 agenda for sustainable development goals (SDGs) that was adopted in 2015 with the motive of “transforming our world”.

Released: 17-Aug-2022 12:00 PM EDT
Deriving Schwann Cells from hPSCs Enables Disease Modeling and Drug Discovery for Diabetic Peripheral Neuropathy
Preprints

Homa Majd, Sadaf Amin, Zaniar Ghazizadeh, Andrius Cesiulis, Edgardo Arroyo, Karen Lankford, Sina Farahvashi, Angeline K Chemel, Mesomachukwu Okoye, Megan D Scantlen, Jason Tchieu, Elizabeth L Calder, Valerie LeRouzic, Abolfazl Arab,

Released: 17-Aug-2022 12:00 PM EDT
Media for culturing cells v1
Preprints

Rebecca Berrens


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