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Newswise: American Society for Radiation Oncology (ASTRO) to host virtual Annual Meeting, October 25-28
Released: 9-Jul-2020 1:00 PM EDT
American Society for Radiation Oncology (ASTRO) to host virtual Annual Meeting, October 25-28
American Society for Radiation Oncology (ASTRO)

The American Society for Radiation Oncology's (ASTRO) 62nd Annual Meeting, will be held October 25-28 via an interactive virtual platform. The meeting, Global Oncology: Radiation Therapy in a Changing World, will feature reports from the latest clinical trials; panels on global oncology, health disparities and the novel coronavirus; and an immersive attendee experience in a virtual convention center. Media resources are available at www.astro.org/astro2020press.

Released: 9-Jul-2020 12:45 PM EDT
Structural analysis of COVID-19 spike protein provides insight into its evolution
Francis Crick Institute

Researchers at the Francis Crick Institute have characterised the structure of the SARS-CoV-2 spike protein as well as its most similar relative in a bat coronavirus.

Released: 9-Jul-2020 12:40 PM EDT
Psychologists pinpoint psychological factors of refugee integration
University of Münster

Due to border closures in the wake of the corona crisis, the arrival of refugees in Europe has temporarily dipped.

Released: 9-Jul-2020 12:35 PM EDT
Parents' smartphone use does not harm parent/child relationships
Edith Cowan University

Contrary to popular views, parental smartphone use is rarely associated with poor parenting, and more often than not, tends to be associated with warm and attached parenting.

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Released: 9-Jul-2020 12:30 PM EDT
Climate change: Heavy rain after drought may cause fish kills
University of Southern Denmark

Fish kills are a recurring phenomenon in lakes suffering from oxygen depletion. Often the kills are triggered by factors like an algae bloom, but now a new study reports on a new, climate-related cause of fish kills.

Newswise: Detection of electrical signaling between tomato plants raises interesting questions
Released: 9-Jul-2020 12:20 PM EDT
Detection of electrical signaling between tomato plants raises interesting questions
University of Alabama Huntsville

The soil beneath our feet is alive with electrical signals being sent from one plant to another, according to research in which a University of Alabama in Huntsville (UAH) distinguished professor emeritus in the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering participated.

Released: 9-Jul-2020 12:20 PM EDT
Face Masks Can be Devastating for People with Hearing loss, NYU professors say in British Medical Journal
New York University

Experts examine the serious implications of needed coronavirus prevention measures on health care practitioners and their patients with hearing loss.

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Released: 9-Jul-2020 12:15 PM EDT
How vaping companies are using Instagram to market to young people
Aalto University

E-cigarettes are highly addictive nicotine products with unclear health impacts, particularly on young people. Instagram is a visual social media platform which is wildly popular, particularly with young people

Newswise: Research News Tip Sheet: Story Ideas from Johns Hopkins Medicine
Released: 9-Jul-2020 12:00 PM EDT
Research News Tip Sheet: Story Ideas from Johns Hopkins Medicine
Johns Hopkins Medicine

During the COVID-19 pandemic, Johns Hopkins Medicine Media Relations is focused on disseminating current, accurate and useful information to the public via the media. As part of that effort, we are distributing our “COVID-19 Tip Sheet: Story Ideas from Johns Hopkins” every Tuesday throughout the duration of the outbreak.

Newswise: UCLA: Global Study Finds Critical Gaps in Workplace Protections
7-Jul-2020 3:50 PM EDT
UCLA: Global Study Finds Critical Gaps in Workplace Protections
UCLA Fielding School of Public Health

A sweeping study of 193 countries by the UCLA WORLD Policy Analysis Center reveals critical gaps in legal protections against discrimination on the job. Nearly one in four countries continue to have no legal protection from discrimination at work based on race and ethnicity, according to the study, just published in the journal Equality, Diversity and Inclusion.

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Released: 9-Jul-2020 11:50 AM EDT
Researcher reconstructs skull of two million year-old giant dormouse
University of York

A PhD student has produced the first digital reconstruction of the skull of a gigantic dormouse, which roamed the island of Sicily around two million years ago.

Released: 9-Jul-2020 11:45 AM EDT
Gene yields insights into the causes of neurodegeneration
Cornell University

Cornell researchers including Fenghua Hu, associate professor in the Department of Molecular Biology and Genetics and member of the Weill Institute for Cell and Molecular Biology, are taking a closer look at the factors that cause Alzheimer’s, FTLD and similar diseases. Hu’s latest study, “A role of the frontotemporal lobar degeneration risk factor TMEM106B in myelination,” was published June 23 in the journal Brain.

Newswise: Is COVID-19 widening the gender gap in academic medicine?
Released: 9-Jul-2020 11:35 AM EDT
Is COVID-19 widening the gender gap in academic medicine?
Michigan Medicine - University of Michigan

A new study finds that fewer women were first authors on COVID-19-related research papers published in the first half of this year. The findings suggest a worsening gender gap in academic medicine, where women were already underrepresented among authors of medical research.

Released: 9-Jul-2020 11:25 AM EDT
Desert island discs: Music listened to in younger years defines us forever, research finds
SAGE Publications UK

Researchers at the University of Westminster and City University of London analysing the music record choices of guests on BBC Radio 4's Desert Island Discs programme has found that the music we listen to between the age of 10 and 30 define us for the rest of our lives.

Released: 9-Jul-2020 11:10 AM EDT
How Can Education Researchers Support Education and Public Health Institutions During Covid-19?
American Educational Research Association (AERA)

As education researchers’ ongoing work is interrupted by school closures, what can they do to support education and public health institutions dealing with the Covid-19 pandemic? An article published today in Educational Researcher aims to answer that question, providing recommendations based on conversations with public health officials, state and local policymakers, educational leaders, directors of national education organizations, and researchers across disciplines.

Released: 9-Jul-2020 11:05 AM EDT
Sodium found to regulate the biological clock of mice
McGill University

A new study from McGill University shows that increases in the concentrations of blood sodium can have an influence on the biological clock of mice, opening new research avenues for potentially treating the negative effects associated with long distance travel or shift work.

Newswise: Argonne soil carbon research reduces uncertainty in predicting climate change impacts
Released: 9-Jul-2020 11:05 AM EDT
Argonne soil carbon research reduces uncertainty in predicting climate change impacts
Argonne National Laboratory

DOE and USDA researchers use new global models to study how environmental controllers affect soil organic carbon, changes in which can alter atmospheric carbon concentrations and affect climate. Predictions could benefit industry mitigation plans.

8-Jul-2020 11:00 AM EDT
Cleveland Clinic Researchers Find Rise In Broken Heart Syndrome During COVID-19 Pandemic
Cleveland Clinic

Cleveland Clinic researchers have found a significant increase in patients experiencing stress cardiomyopathy, also known as broken heart syndrome, during the COVID-19 pandemic.

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Embargo will expire: 13-Jul-2020 2:00 PM EDT Released to reporters: 9-Jul-2020 10:50 AM EDT

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Released: 9-Jul-2020 10:40 AM EDT
Study: More than Half of U.S. Students Experience Summer Learning Losses Five Years in a Row
American Educational Research Association (AERA)

Following U.S. students across five summers between grades 1 and 6, a little more than half (52 percent) experienced learning losses in all five summers, according to a large national study published today. Students in this group lost an average of 39 percent of their total school year gains during each summer.

Newswise: NSU Researcher Part of Team Addressing Potential Risks to Marine Life from Deep-Sea Mining
Released: 9-Jul-2020 10:25 AM EDT
NSU Researcher Part of Team Addressing Potential Risks to Marine Life from Deep-Sea Mining
Nova Southeastern University

As the planet’s land-based natural resources become exhausted, the need for new sources is bringing the search to the deepest parts of the world’s oceans. And that has researchers across the globe very concerned.

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Embargo will expire: 13-Jul-2020 8:00 AM EDT Released to reporters: 9-Jul-2020 10:10 AM EDT

A reporter's PressPass is required to access this story until the embargo expires on 13-Jul-2020 8:00 AM EDT The Newswise PressPass gives verified journalists access to embargoed stories. Please log in to complete a presspass application. If you have not yet registered, please Register. When you fill out the registration form, please identify yourself as a reporter in order to advance to the presspass application form.

access_time Embargo lifts in 2 days
Embargo will expire: 13-Jul-2020 11:00 AM EDT Released to reporters: 9-Jul-2020 10:05 AM EDT

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Newswise: Breast Cancer Cells Can Reprogram Immune Cells to Assist in Metastasis
9-Jul-2020 10:00 AM EDT
Breast Cancer Cells Can Reprogram Immune Cells to Assist in Metastasis
Johns Hopkins Medicine

Johns Hopkins Kimmel Cancer Center investigators report they have uncovered a new mechanism by which invasive breast cancer cells evade the immune system to metastasize, or spread, to other areas of the body. They propose that therapies targeting this process could be developed to halt or prevent metastasis and reduce breast cancer deaths.

Newswise:Video Embedded breast-cancer-cells-turn-killer-immune-cells-into-allies
VIDEO
6-Jul-2020 8:55 AM EDT
Breast Cancer Cells Turn Killer Immune Cells Into Allies
The Rockefeller University Press

Researchers at Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine have discovered that breast cancer cells can alter the function of immune cells known as Natural killer (NK) cells so that instead of killing the cancer cells, they facilitate their spread to other parts of the body. The study, which will be published July 9 in the Journal of Cell Biology (JCB), suggests that preventing this reprogramming might stop breast cancer from metastasizing to other tissues, a major cause of death in breast cancer patients.

access_time Embargo lifts in 2 days
Embargo will expire: 15-Jul-2020 2:00 PM EDT Released to reporters: 9-Jul-2020 9:55 AM EDT

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Released: 9-Jul-2020 9:45 AM EDT
Distorted Passage of Time During the Covid-19 Lockdown
PLOS

A survey conducted in the U.K. suggests that social and physical distancing measures put in place during the Covid-19 pandemic significantly impacted people’s perception of how quickly time passed compared to their pre-lockdown perceptions.

Released: 9-Jul-2020 9:25 AM EDT
What happens when food first touches your tongue
Ohio State University

New research explains why humans register taste more quickly when food or drink moves over their tongues quickly, as compared to when they are held in their mouth steadily.

Released: 9-Jul-2020 9:20 AM EDT
Contracting COVID-19, Lifestyle and Social Connections May Play a Role
Association for Psychological Science

Current research indicates that unhealthy lifestyle choices along with emotional stressors like social are important risk factors for developing upper respiratory infections. It is possible these same factors also increase the risk of contracting COVID-19.

Newswise: Black Individuals at Higher Risk for Contracting COVID-19, According to New Research
Released: 9-Jul-2020 8:00 AM EDT
Black Individuals at Higher Risk for Contracting COVID-19, According to New Research
American Thoracic Society (ATS)

Results of an analysis published in the Annals of the American Thoracic Society found that Black individuals were twice as likely as White individuals to test positive for COVID-19. The average age of all participants in the study was 46. However, those infected were on average 52 years old, compared to those who tested negative, who were 45 years old on average.

Newswise: Water-Saving Alternative Forage Crops for Texas Livestock
Released: 9-Jul-2020 8:00 AM EDT
Water-Saving Alternative Forage Crops for Texas Livestock
American Society of Agronomy (ASA), Crop Science Society of America (CSSA), Soil Science Society of America (SSSA)

With increasing drought conditions in the Texas High Plains, researchers test sorghum and pearl millet as alternatives to corn

Newswise: Study Sheds Light on How Cancer Spreads in Blood
Released: 9-Jul-2020 6:05 AM EDT
Study Sheds Light on How Cancer Spreads in Blood
Cedars-Sinai

A new study sheds light on proteins in particles called extracellular vesicles, which are released by tumor cells into the bloodstream and promote the spread of cancer. The findings suggest how a blood test involving these vesicles might be used to diagnose cancer in the future, avoiding the need for invasive surgical biopsies.

Released: 9-Jul-2020 4:25 AM EDT
Chatbots can ease medical providers' burden, offer trusted guidance to those with COVID-19 symptoms
Indiana University

COVID-19 has placed tremendous pressure on health care systems, not only for critical care but also from an anxious public looking for answers. Research from the Indiana University Kelley School of Business found that chatbots -- software applications that conduct online chats via text or text-to-speech -- working for reputable organizations can ease the burden on medical providers and offer trusted guidance to those with symptoms.

7-Jul-2020 3:55 PM EDT
Access to Nature Requires Attention When Addressing Community Health Needs
Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania

Nature is a tool to address deeply entrenched health disparities; health systems should work to increase nature access, as they have with other social determinants of health

Released: 8-Jul-2020 11:05 PM EDT
New Clues from Fruit Flies about the Critical Role of Sex Hormones in Stem Cell Control
Huntsman Cancer Institute at the University of Utah

In one of the first studies addressing the role of sex hormones’ impact on stem cells in the gut, scientists outline new insights showing how a steroidal sex hormone that is structurally and functionally similar to human steroid hormones drastically alters the way intestinal stem cells behave, ultimately affecting the overarching structure and function of this critical organ. The authors found that ecdysone, a steroid hormone produced by fruit flies, stimulates intestinal stem cell growth and causes the gut of the female fruit fly to grow in size, as well as other critical changes.

Newswise: Ozone Disinfection Could Allow Safe Reuse of Personal Protective Equipment (PPE)
Released: 8-Jul-2020 8:05 PM EDT
Ozone Disinfection Could Allow Safe Reuse of Personal Protective Equipment (PPE)
Georgia Institute of Technology

A new study shows that ozone gas, a highly reactive chemical composed of three oxygen atoms, could provide a safe means for disinfecting certain types of personal protective equipment that are in high demand for shielding health care personnel from Covid-19.

Released: 8-Jul-2020 8:05 PM EDT
Children Who Witness Intimate Partner Violence Benefit from Joint Community and Law Enforcement Intervention
Rutgers University-New Brunswick

The Child Trauma Response Team, an innovative police and community-based organization partnership, demonstrated success at screening and treating children for post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) immediately following incidents of intimate partner violence, according to a Rutgers-led study published in the Journal of Interpersonal Violence.

Newswise: Experimental drug shows early promise against inherited form of ALS, trial indicates
8-Jul-2020 8:55 AM EDT
Experimental drug shows early promise against inherited form of ALS, trial indicates
Washington University in St. Louis

A clinical trial conducted at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis and other sites has found evidence that the experimental drug tofersen lowers levels of a disease-causing protein in people with an inherited form of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, or ALS, caused by mutations in the gene SOD1.

Released: 8-Jul-2020 4:30 PM EDT
Nurses and Midwives Take the Lead in Providing HIV Services in Eastern and Southern Africa
Wolters Kluwer Health: Lippincott Williams and Wilkins

“Nurse-initiated and managed antiretroviral therapy” (NIMART) is an innovative approach to making effective medications more accessible to people living with HIV (PLWH) in low-resource countries. A new study identifies challenges and opportunities to promoting nurse- and midwife-led HIV services in eastern and southern Africa, reports the July/August issue of The Journal of the Association of Nurses in AIDS Care (JANAC). The official journal of the Association of Nurses in AIDS Care, JANAC is published in the Lippincott portfolio by Wolters Kluwer.

7-Jul-2020 10:00 AM EDT
Simple Blood Test May Predict Concussion Severity Just as Well as Spinal Tap
American Academy of Neurology (AAN)

A blood biomarker in people who have had concussions may be just as accurate at predicting the severity of the injury and how long it will last as biomarkers that are obtained through more expensive and invasive tests, according to a study published in the July 8, 2020, online issue of Neurology®, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology.

Newswise: University of Miami Miller School-led technology paves way for islet regeneration in human pancreas
Released: 8-Jul-2020 3:50 PM EDT
University of Miami Miller School-led technology paves way for islet regeneration in human pancreas
University of Miami Health System, Miller School of Medicine

New research published in Nature Communications uses a technology first developed at the University of Miami Miller School of Medicine to enhance the oxygenation of cultured tissues that will likely be able to conduct real-time regeneration and development studies in the human pancreas.

Newswise:Video Embedded research-firm-navatek-to-open-wichita-state-office-partnership-will-greatly-grow-military-research
VIDEO
Released: 8-Jul-2020 3:45 PM EDT
Research firm Navatek to open Wichita State office; partnership will greatly grow military research
Wichita State University

Navatek LLC, a contractor focused on technology research for U.S. government agencies such as the Department of Defense and NASA, is opening an office on the Wichita State University campus in fall 2020.

Released: 8-Jul-2020 3:40 PM EDT
In Firefighter Trainees, ‘Mediterranean Lifestyle’ Linked to Lower Health Risks
Journal of Occupational and Environmental Medicine

Young firefighter recruits who follow a ‘Mediterranean lifestyle’ are less likely to have hypertension (high blood pressure) and more likely to have good aerobic fitness, reports a study in the July Journal of Occupational and Environmental Medicine.

Released: 8-Jul-2020 3:40 PM EDT
New Study Finds COVID-19 Impact on Community Radiology Practices
Harvey L. Neiman Health Policy Institute

The COVID-19 pandemic has quickly spread across all 50 United States. Associated recommendations that healthcare facilities defer non-urgent visits, tests, and procedures led many imaging facilities to temporarily curtail most of their non-urgent services. This new Neiman Institute study characterizes the recent declines in non-invasive imaging volumes at community practices.

Released: 8-Jul-2020 3:25 PM EDT
Researchers uncover a critical early step of the visual process
University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston

The key components of electrical connections between light receptors in the eye and the impact of these connections on the early steps of visual signal processing have been identified for the first time, according to research published today in Science Advances by The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston (UTHealth).

Released: 8-Jul-2020 2:55 PM EDT
CHOP-Pioneered Spatial Mapping Method Pinpoints Potential New Therapeutic Targets in Lupus
Children's Hospital of Philadelphia

A team of researchers from Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia (CHOP) used a new method of pinpointing potential disease-causing changes in the genome to identify two new potential therapeutic targets for lupus, while also paving the way for more accurately identifying disease-causing variations in other autoimmune disorders.

Released: 8-Jul-2020 2:55 PM EDT
Therapy delivered electronically more effective than face to face: Hamilton researchers
McMaster University

Based on randomized control trials, the systematic review and analysis revealed that cognitive behavioural therapy that connected therapists and patients through such modes as web-based applications, video-conferencing, email and texting, improved patients’ symptoms better than face to face when measured using standardized mood symptoms scales. As well, there was no difference in the level of satisfaction or function between the two methods of delivery.

Released: 8-Jul-2020 2:55 PM EDT
Study Finds Decreased Rates of High-cost Care after a Community Development Initiative
Nationwide Children's Hospital

More than a decade into the community development initiative called Healthy Neighborhoods Healthy Families, the 30-block Southern Orchards neighborhood on Columbus, Ohio’s South Side had clear, notable improvement. Home vacancy fell from 30% to under 6%. High school graduation rates increased. More than $40 million in investments were generated in the area.

Released: 8-Jul-2020 2:50 PM EDT
How good gut bacteria help reduce the risk for heart disease
Ohio State University

Scientists have discovered that one of the good bacteria found in the human gut has a benefit that has remained unrecognized until now: the potential to reduce the risk for heart disease.

Released: 8-Jul-2020 2:05 PM EDT
Researchers propose novel approach to limit organ damage, improve outcomes for patients with severe COVID-19
Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center

In a paper published in Cancer and Metastasis Reviews, a team of researchers from Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center and Brigham and Women’s Hospital propose that controlling the local and systemic inflammatory response in COVID-19 may be as important as anti-viral and other therapies.


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