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Newswise: Drug Combination Gets Advanced Liver Cancer Patients to Surgery
Released: 29-Jul-2021 3:00 PM EDT
Drug Combination Gets Advanced Liver Cancer Patients to Surgery
Johns Hopkins Medicine

A combination of the kinase-inhibitor drug cabozantinib and the immunotherapy drug nivolumab can make curative surgery possible in some liver cancer patients who would normally not be considered surgery candidates.

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Embargo will expire: 2-Aug-2021 11:00 AM EDT Released to reporters: 29-Jul-2021 2:50 PM EDT

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Embargo will expire: 3-Aug-2021 1:20 PM EDT Released to reporters: 29-Jul-2021 2:45 PM EDT

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Newswise: Women Less Likely Than Men to Receive Opportune Care After Stroke, Study Finds
29-Jul-2021 2:30 PM EDT
Women Less Likely Than Men to Receive Opportune Care After Stroke, Study Finds
University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston

Women are less likely than men to receive timely care for strokes caused by blockages in large vessels, known as emergent large vessel occlusion (ELVO), according to researchers with The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston (UTHealth).

Newswise: Fungus That Tastes Just Right
Released: 29-Jul-2021 2:25 PM EDT
Fungus That Tastes Just Right
Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

PNNL researchers are forming a clearer picture of how plant matter is transformed in the microbial gardens created by leaf-cutter ants

Newswise: Understanding Silicon Failure Opens Up Research Path for Higher-Capacity Lithium-Ion Batteries
Released: 29-Jul-2021 2:20 PM EDT
Understanding Silicon Failure Opens Up Research Path for Higher-Capacity Lithium-Ion Batteries
Los Alamos National Laboratory

In silicon-wire lithium-ion batteries, electrolytes carve away the silicon, blocking electron pathways and greatly diminishing the charging capacity of these promising devices.

Released: 29-Jul-2021 2:20 PM EDT
Study Shows Visual Evoked Potential Is a Promising Tool for Translational Research Into Phelan-McDermid Syndrome and Autism Spectrum Disorders
Mount Sinai Health System

Researchers at the Seaver Autism Center for Research and Treatment at Mount Sinai have identified specific transient visual evoked potential waveform abnormalities in individuals with Phelan-McDermid syndrome (PMS), proving the method to be an effective, noninvasive technique to gather objective data from a range of individuals, including those who are profoundly affected.

Released: 29-Jul-2021 2:10 PM EDT
Warning Over Start of Commercial-Scale Deep-Sea Mining
University of Exeter

Deep-sea mining in international waters could begin in two years – but researchers say this is unnecessary and could cause irreversible damage to marine ecosystems.

Newswise: Depth of Perception
26-Jul-2021 1:35 PM EDT
Depth of Perception
Washington University in St. Louis

Minuscule tunnels through the cell membrane help cells to perceive and respond to mechanical forces, such as pressure or touch. Using tip-growing cells in moss and pollen tubes of flowering plants, a new study is among the first to directly investigate what one type of these mechanosensitive ion channels -- PIEZO channels -- is doing in plant cells, and how.

Released: 29-Jul-2021 1:50 PM EDT
FSU Researchers Find La Niña Increases Carbon Export From Amazon River
Florida State University

When La Niña brings unusually warm waters and abnormal air pressure to the Pacific Ocean, the resulting weather patterns create an increase in the carbon export from the Amazon River, new research from Florida State University has found.

Released: 29-Jul-2021 1:25 PM EDT
Support for Adults with Autism
Flinders University

Autistic adults may have different behaviours or perspectives in the workplace or in social situations which may lead them into compromised situations.

Newswise: Machine Learning for Cardiovascular Disease Improves When Social, Environmental Factors Are Included
Released: 29-Jul-2021 12:05 PM EDT
Machine Learning for Cardiovascular Disease Improves When Social, Environmental Factors Are Included
NYU Tandon School of Engineering

Machine learning can accurately predict cardiovascular disease and guide treatment — but models that incorporate social determinants of health better capture risk and outcomes for diverse groups, finds a new study by researchers at the New York University Tandon School of Engineering and the NYU School of Global Public Health.

Released: 29-Jul-2021 12:05 PM EDT
Moffitt Researchers Identify New Relevant Target for PARP Inhibitor Talazoparib
Moffitt Cancer Center

In a new study published in Cell Chemical Biology, Moffitt Cancer Center researchers report their identification of a new target for the PARP inhibitor drug talazoparib and show that combination treatment with talazoparib and the WEE1 inhibitor adavosertib results in enhanced anti-cancer effects.

28-Jul-2021 2:30 PM EDT
New Study Finds Hands-free Cellphone Laws Associated with Fewer Driver Deaths
Nationwide Children's Hospital

A recent study led by researchers at the Center for Injury Research and Policy at Nationwide Children’s Hospital looked at drivers, non-drivers (passengers, pedestrians, bicyclists, motorcyclists), and total deaths involved in passenger vehicle crashes from 1999 through 2016 in 50 U.S. states, along with the presence and characteristics of cellphone use laws.

Released: 29-Jul-2021 11:45 AM EDT
No Particular Risk of Infection of SARS-CoV-2 From Cash
Ruhr-Universität Bochum

How long do coronaviruses remain infectious on banknotes and coins? Is it possible to become infected through contact with cash?

Released: 29-Jul-2021 11:35 AM EDT
Combined Effects of Masking and Distance on Aerosol Exposure Potential
Mayo Clinic

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) recommended this week that people vaccinated against COVID-19 resume wearing masks in public indoor spaces in areas of the United States where the virus is spreading. “Appropriate masking in addition to vaccination remain the best methods to help protect individuals from the Coronavirus,” says Gregory Poland, M.D., an infectious disease expert at Mayo Clinic.

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Embargo will expire: 2-Aug-2021 11:00 AM EDT Released to reporters: 29-Jul-2021 11:15 AM EDT

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Newswise: AI Learns Physics to Optimize Particle Accelerator Performance
Released: 29-Jul-2021 11:15 AM EDT
AI Learns Physics to Optimize Particle Accelerator Performance
SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory

Researchers at the Department of Energy’s SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory have demonstrated that they can use machine learning to optimize the performance of particle accelerators by teaching the algorithms the basic physics principles behind accelerator operations – no prior data needed.

Newswise: Hopkins Med News Update
Released: 29-Jul-2021 11:00 AM EDT
Hopkins Med News Update
Johns Hopkins Medicine

NEWS STORIES IN THIS ISSUE: -Study: Race and Ethnicity May Impact Prevalence and Treatment of Heart Valve Dysfunction -Johns Hopkins Medicine Suggests Eliminating Nerve Cell Protein May Stop ALS, Dementia -Researchers Tell Doctors to Avoid Routine Urinary Tests for Older Patients with Delirium -Johns Hopkins Medicine Researchers Show How Air Pollution May Cause Chronic Sinusitis -Researchers ID Location on Brain Protein Linked to Parkinson’s Disease Development -COVID-19 News: The Return of Onsite Schooling — and How to Keep Your Kids Safe from COVID

Released: 29-Jul-2021 10:55 AM EDT
US Subsidies Boost the Expected Profits and Development of New Oil and Gas Fields
Institute of Physics (IOP) Publishing

Researchers at the Stockholm Environment Institute (Somerville and Seattle, USA) and Earth Track, Inc. (Cambridge, MA, USA) examined 16 subsidies and environmental regulatory exemptions, providing one of the first estimates of how government subsidies will affect investment decisions for new gas fields in the coming decade.

Newswise: Computer Science, Environmental Health Experts at UIC Team Up to Protect US Navy Divers with AI
Released: 29-Jul-2021 10:45 AM EDT
Computer Science, Environmental Health Experts at UIC Team Up to Protect US Navy Divers with AI
University of Illinois Chicago

The U.S. Office of Naval Research has awarded University of Illinois Chicago researchers $725,000 to develop an artificial intelligence system that can help protect divers from waterborne bacteria, parasites, and other harmful pathogens and microbes.

Released: 29-Jul-2021 10:45 AM EDT
Could Powerful Ovarian Cancer Treatments Benefit More Patients?
Walter & Eliza Hall Institute

WEHI researchers have made a discovery that could help more Australian women with ovarian cancer gain access to game-changing cancer treatments called PARP inhibitors.

Newswise: New Economic Dashboard Could Serve as Early Warning System for State-Level Recessions, Other Economic Shocks
Released: 29-Jul-2021 10:05 AM EDT
New Economic Dashboard Could Serve as Early Warning System for State-Level Recessions, Other Economic Shocks
University of Notre Dame

University of Notre Dame researchers developed the first near-real-time dashboard that tracks weekly state-level economic conditions.

access_time Embargo lifts in 2 days
Embargo will expire: 5-Aug-2021 10:00 AM EDT Released to reporters: 29-Jul-2021 9:50 AM EDT

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27-Jul-2021 2:55 PM EDT
We are More Forgiving When People Close to Us Misbehave
American Psychological Association (APA)

When people behave badly or unethically, their loved ones may judge them less harshly than they would judge a stranger who committed the same transgressions, but that leniency may come at the cost of the judger’s own sense of self-worth, according to research published by the American Psychological Association.

Released: 29-Jul-2021 8:05 AM EDT
City-Living Bees Benefit Most From Specific Types of Urban ‘Greening’
Ohio State University

Converting vacant urban lots into greenspaces can reduce blight and improve neighborhoods, and new research shows that certain types of such post-industrial reclamation efforts offer the added bonus of benefiting bees.

Newswise:Video Embedded scientists-observe-gas-re-accretion-in-dying-galaxies-for-the-first-time
VIDEO
Released: 29-Jul-2021 8:00 AM EDT
Scientists Observe Gas Re-accretion in Dying Galaxies for the First Time
National Radio Astronomy Observatory

A new study from scientists using the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) suggests that previously displaced gases can re-accrete onto galaxies, potentially slowing down the process of galaxy death caused by ram pressure stripping, and creating unique structures more resistant to its effects.

Newswise:Video Embedded cient-ficos-observan-por-primera-vez-reacreci-n-de-gas-en-galaxias-moribundas
VIDEO
Released: 29-Jul-2021 8:00 AM EDT
Científicos observan por primera vez reacreción de gas en galaxias moribundas
National Radio Astronomy Observatory

Un nuevo estudio realizado con datos del Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) postula que nubes de gas previamente desplazadas pueden volver a acumularse y formar nuevas galaxias mediante acreción, ralentizando de esa forma el proceso de despojo por presión que causa la extinción de las galaxias y creando estructuras únicas más resistentes a dicho fenómeno.

Released: 29-Jul-2021 6:05 AM EDT
Collisions of Light Produce Matter/Antimatter from Pure Energy
Brookhaven National Laboratory

Scientists studying particle collisions at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider have produced definitive evidence for two physics phenomena predicted more than 80 years ago: that matter/antimatter can be generated directly from collisions of photons and that a magnetic field can bend polarized light along different paths in a vacuum.

Newswise: Eliminating RNA-Binding Protein Improves Survival in Aggressive Leukemia
26-Jul-2021 11:15 AM EDT
Eliminating RNA-Binding Protein Improves Survival in Aggressive Leukemia
University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA), Health Sciences

Removing a protein that is often overexpressed in a rare and aggressive subtype of leukemia can help to slow the cancer’s development and significantly increase the likelihood of survival, according to a study in mice led by scientists at the UCLA Jonsson Comprehensive Cancer Center.

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Embargo will expire: 2-Aug-2021 6:00 AM EDT Released to reporters: 28-Jul-2021 5:55 PM EDT

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23-Jul-2021 3:30 PM EDT
Metabolic Syndrome Linked to Increased Risk of Second Stroke, Death
American Academy of Neurology (AAN)

People with larger waistlines, high blood pressure and other risk factors that make up metabolic syndrome may be at higher risk for having a second stroke and even dying than people who do not have metabolic syndrome, according to a meta-analysis published in the July 28, 2021, online issue of Neurology®, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology.

23-Jul-2021 3:30 PM EDT
Study: Adding Color to Your Plate May Lower Risk of Cognitive Decline
American Academy of Neurology (AAN)

A new study shows that people who eat a diet that includes at least half a serving per day of foods high in flavonoids like strawberries, oranges, peppers and apples may have a 20% lower risk of cognitive decline. The research is published in the July 28, 2021, online issue of Neurology®, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. The study looked at several types of flavonoids, and found that flavones and anthocyanins may have the most protective effect.

Released: 28-Jul-2021 3:20 PM EDT
How a Microscopic Fungus Could Lead to a Breakthrough in Oral Cancer Research
Case Western Reserve University

Researchers from Case Western Reserve University are hoping a new study could lead to a medical breakthrough in understanding certain types of oral cancer.

Newswise: Public
Released: 28-Jul-2021 2:45 PM EDT
Highly Potent, Stable Nanobodies Stop SARS-CoV-2
Max Planck Society (Max-Planck-Gesellschaft)

Göttingen researchers have developed mini-antibodies that efficiently block the coronavirus SARS-CoV-2 and its dangerous new variants.

Released: 28-Jul-2021 2:30 PM EDT
Motivation Depends on How the Brain Processes Fatigue
University of Birmingham

How do we decide whether or not an activity which requires work is ‘worth the effort’?

Newswise: Hemp Goes ‘Hot’ Due to Genetics, Not Environmental Stress
Released: 28-Jul-2021 2:25 PM EDT
Hemp Goes ‘Hot’ Due to Genetics, Not Environmental Stress
Cornell University

A new Cornell University study debunks misinformation on websites and in news articles that claim that environmental or biological stresses – such as flooding or disease – cause an increase in THC production in hemp plants.

Newswise: Public
Released: 28-Jul-2021 2:20 PM EDT
Psychological Consequences of COVID-19 in Health Care
University of Bonn

Physicians, nursing staff, medical technical assistants, and pastoral workers in hospitals: they have all been placed under severe strain by the Covid-19 pandemic.

Newswise: Public
Released: 28-Jul-2021 2:10 PM EDT
Why Lockdown in Africa Does Not Work as a First COVID-19 Pandemic Response
University of Johannesburg

In an African pandemic it is more productive to consider lockdowns, after using other non-medical measures first, Especially in countries with high levels of poverty and corruption, says Prof Nicholas Ngepah, a Professor of Economics at the University of Johannesburg in South Africa.

Newswise:Video Embedded does-testosterone-influence-success-not-much-research-suggests
VIDEO
27-Jul-2021 11:40 AM EDT
Does Testosterone Influence Success? Not Much, Research Suggests
University of Bristol

With the Olympics underway, higher testosterone has often been linked to sporting success, and other kinds of success too. But beyond sport, new research has found little evidence that testosterone meaningfully influences life chances for men or women.

Newswise: New Tool Predicts Sudden Death in Inflammatory Heart Disease
27-Jul-2021 2:10 PM EDT
New Tool Predicts Sudden Death in Inflammatory Heart Disease
Johns Hopkins University

Johns Hopkins University scientists have developed a new tool for predicting which patients suffering from a complex inflammatory heart disease are at risk of sudden cardiac arrest. Published in Science Advances, their method is the first to combine models of patients’ hearts built from multiple images with the power of machine learning.

Newswise: Fruit Compound May Have Potential to Prevent and Treat Parkinson’s Disease, Mouse Study Suggests
26-Jul-2021 10:25 AM EDT
Fruit Compound May Have Potential to Prevent and Treat Parkinson’s Disease, Mouse Study Suggests
Johns Hopkins Medicine

Johns Hopkins Medicine researchers say they have added to evidence that the compound farnesol, found naturally in herbs, and berries and other fruits, prevents and reverses brain damage linked to Parkinson’s disease in mouse studies.

Released: 28-Jul-2021 1:50 PM EDT
Molecular Atlas Reveals How Brain Cells Develop
École Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne (EPFL)

As the fertilized egg divides, initially undifferentiated cells take on specific functions, becoming more distinct as different tissues and organs emerge.

Newswise: Fighting Off Food Poisoning Depends on The Time Of Day
Released: 28-Jul-2021 1:30 PM EDT
Fighting Off Food Poisoning Depends on The Time Of Day
UT Southwestern Medical Center

DALLAS – July 28, 2021 – The body’s ability to prevent food poisoning by producing a natural antimicrobial compound increases during the day, when exposure to noxious bacteria is most likely, a new study by UT Southwestern scientists suggests. The findings, published online in Cell, could eventually lead to timed therapies and vaccination regimens designed to maximize this immune response.

Newswise: Parker_KimRecord-300x200.jpg
Released: 28-Jul-2021 1:15 PM EDT
Two Strands Are Tougher Than One
Washington University in St. Louis

Despite assumptions, dsRNA has traits that make it stand apart from the more common single-stranded RNA. The finding has implications for a range of fields

Released: 28-Jul-2021 1:00 PM EDT
Obesity and Cardiovascular Factors Combine to Cause Cognitive Decline in Latinos
University of California San Diego Health

Obesity is a major public health issue among Latinos, and a risk factor for Alzheimer’s disease. But in a new study, researchers at UC San Diego report that cardiometabolic abnormalities, such as hypertension, are more strongly associated with cognitive decline than obesity alone.

Released: 28-Jul-2021 1:00 PM EDT
Chaotic Electrons Heed ‘Limit’ in Strange Metals
Cornell University

Chaos, to a point: A new Cornell-led study confirms the chaotic behavior of electrons in “strange” metals has a limit established by the laws of quantum mechanics.

Released: 28-Jul-2021 12:55 PM EDT
Geographic Differences in Gut Microbiota Boost Immunity
Cornell University

Gut reaction: Cornell researchers “humanized” mice with microbiota from three global populations and found that microbial differences alone can impact immune responses.

Newswise: Indian Women’s Nutrition Suffered During COVID-19 Lockdown
Released: 28-Jul-2021 12:50 PM EDT
Indian Women’s Nutrition Suffered During COVID-19 Lockdown
Cornell University

A new study from Cornell University finds the nationwide lockdown India imposed last year in response to COVID-19 caused disruptions that negatively impacted women’s nutrition.

Newswise: Public
Released: 28-Jul-2021 12:40 PM EDT
First Detection of Light From Behind a Black Hole
Stanford University

Watching X-rays flung out into the universe by the supermassive black hole at the center of a galaxy 800 million light-years away, Stanford University astrophysicist Dan Wilkins noticed an intriguing pattern.


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