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Released: 13-May-2021 10:35 AM EDT
New study reveals where memories of familiar places are stored in the brain
Dartmouth College

As we move through the world, what we see is seamlessly integrated with our memory of the broader spatial environment. How does the brain accomplish this feat?

Released: 13-May-2021 10:35 AM EDT
Abortion opposition related to beliefs about fetal pain perception
University of Otago

A person's stance on abortion is linked to their, often inaccurate, belief about when a fetus can feel pain, a University of Otago study has found.

Released: 13-May-2021 10:30 AM EDT
Pandemic stigma: Foreigners, doctors wrongly targeted for COVID-19 spread in India
Monash University

The Indian public blamed foreigners, minority groups and doctors for the rapid spread of COVID-19 across the country during the first wave, due to misinformation, rumour and long-held discriminatory beliefs, according to an international study led by Monash University.

Newswise: 264862_web.jpg
Released: 13-May-2021 10:20 AM EDT
Scientists show how to attack the 'fortress' surrounding pancreatic cancer tumors
University of New South Wales

UNSW medical researchers have found a way to starve pancreatic cancer cells and 'disable' the cells that block treatment from working effectively.

Released: 13-May-2021 10:20 AM EDT
Eating more fruit and vegetables linked to less stress - study
Edith Cowan University

Eating a diet rich in fruit and vegetables is associated with less stress, according to new research from Edith Cowan University (ECU).

Newswise: 264873_web.jpg
Released: 13-May-2021 10:15 AM EDT
Ankle and foot bone evolution gave prehistoric mammals a leg up
University of Edinburgh

The evolution of ankle and foot bones into different shapes and sizes helped mammals adapt and thrive after the extinction of the dinosaurs, a study suggests.

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Embargo will expire: 18-May-2021 11:00 AM EDT Released to reporters: 13-May-2021 10:15 AM EDT

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Newswise: How widespread is lemur and fossa meat consumption?
Released: 13-May-2021 10:05 AM EDT
How widespread is lemur and fossa meat consumption?
Wildlife Conservation Society

A new study looks at the prevalence of human consumption of lemur and fossa (Madagascar’s largest predator) in villages within and around Makira Natural Park, northeastern Madagascar, providing up-to-date estimates of the percentage of households who eat meat from these protected species.

Newswise: Molecular Alteration May Be Cause — Not Consequence — of Heart Failure
Released: 13-May-2021 10:00 AM EDT
Molecular Alteration May Be Cause — Not Consequence — of Heart Failure
Johns Hopkins Medicine

Clinicians and scientists have long observed that cells in overstressed hearts have high levels of the simple sugar O-GlcNAc modifying thousands of proteins within cells. Now, researchers at Johns Hopkins Medicine have found evidence in mouse experiments that these excess sugars could well be a cause, not merely a consequence or marker of heart failure.

Newswise: Fruit Flies and Mosquitos are ‘Brainier’ than Most People Suspect, Say Scientists Who Counted the Bugs’ Brain Cells
13-May-2021 9:00 AM EDT
Fruit Flies and Mosquitos are ‘Brainier’ than Most People Suspect, Say Scientists Who Counted the Bugs’ Brain Cells
Johns Hopkins Medicine

In research made possible when COVID-19 sidelined other research projects, scientists at Johns Hopkins Medicine meticulously counted brain cells in fruit flies and three species of mosquitos, revealing a number that would surprise many people outside the science world.

Released: 13-May-2021 8:00 AM EDT
Dental procedures during pandemic are no riskier than a drink of water
Ohio State University

A new study’s findings dispel the misconception that patients and providers are at high risk of catching COVID-19 at the dentist’s office.

Newswise:Video Embedded lung-damage-not-the-culprit-for-post-covid-exercise-limitations
VIDEO
Released: 13-May-2021 7:00 AM EDT
Lung Damage Not the Culprit for Post-COVID Exercise Limitations
American Physiological Society (APS)

A new study suggests the lungs may not be the main factor that reduce exercise ability in people recovering from severe COVID-19. Anemia and muscle dysfunction also play a role. The study is published ahead of print in the Journal of Applied Physiology. It was chosen as an APSselect article for May.

Newswise: Herbivores developed powerful jaws to digest tougher plants following the Mass Extinctions
13-May-2021 5:35 AM EDT
Herbivores developed powerful jaws to digest tougher plants following the Mass Extinctions
University of Bristol

The evolution of herbivores is linked to the plants that survived and adapted after the ‘great dying’, when over 90% of the world’s species were wiped out 252 million years ago.

12-May-2021 8:05 PM EDT
Imbalance Between Certain Personality Traits in Teens May Raise the Risk for Binge Drinking in Early Adulthood
Research Society on Alcoholism

Teens with high sensation seeking impulses and relatively low cognitive control are at elevated risk for binge drinking in early adulthood, a new study suggests. Young adults aged 18–25 report the highest rates of binge drinking in the previous month, a pattern that predicts later Alcohol Use Disorder (AUD) and other problem health behaviors. Two personality traits that evolve during adolescence and early adulthood — sensation seeking, the tendency to pursue novelty and excitement, and cognitive control, thinking before acting — are known to be related to binge drinking, or heavy episodic drinking (HED). Models of risky behavior among teens suggest that an imbalance involving higher sensation seeking and less-developed cognitive control may drive problem alcohol use. The study, in Alcoholism: Clinical & Experimental Research, examined this imbalance over time as adolescents became young adults, and whether it was associated with binge drinking. Understanding these dynamic risk factors

12-May-2021 8:05 PM EDT
Alcohol Use Disorder Remains Woefully Undertreated Despite Widespread Utilization of Health Care
Research Society on Alcoholism

Rates of treatment for alcohol use disorder (AUD) in the US are alarmingly low, according to a large analysis reported in Alcoholism: Clinical and Experimental Research. An estimated 93,000 people in the US die from alcohol-related causes each year, and mortality associated with AUD has been increasing. Effective treatments for AUD already exist, including evidence-based psychotherapy interventions, mutual aid approaches, and three FDA-approved medications (naltrexone, acamprosate, and disulfiram). However, previous research has indicated that fewer than one in ten people with AUD receive treatment, highlighting the need for a greater understanding of gaps in care and of where interventions can be most appropriately targeted. Researchers at Washington University School of Medicine have now used a ‘cascade of care framework’ to identify these gaps, by tracking the proportion of the AUD population engaged in each step of the care continuum from diagnosis onwards.

Newswise: Quantum machine learning hits a limit
Released: 12-May-2021 6:50 PM EDT
Quantum machine learning hits a limit
Los Alamos National Laboratory

A new theorem from the field of quantum machine learning has poked a major hole in the accepted understanding about information scrambling.

Released: 12-May-2021 5:10 PM EDT
Understanding SARS-COV-2 proteins is key to improve therapeutic options for COVID-19
Bentham Science Publishers

COVID-19 has had a significant impact since the pandemic was declared by WHO in 2020, with over 3 million deaths and counting, Researchers and medical teams have been hard at work at developing strategies to control the spread of the infection, caused by SARS-COV-2 virus and treat affected patients.

Newswise: 264688_web.jpg
Released: 12-May-2021 5:05 PM EDT
Discovery of new geologic process calls for changes to plate tectonic cycle
University of Toronto

Geoscientists at the University of Toronto (U of T) and Istanbul Technical University have discovered a new process in plate tectonics which shows that tremendous damage occurs to areas of Earth's crust long before it should be geologically altered by known plate-boundary processes, highlighting the need to amend current understandings of the planet's tectonic cycle.

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Released: 12-May-2021 4:55 PM EDT
COVID-19 vaccine does not damage the placenta in pregnancy
Northwestern University

A new Northwestern Medicine study of placentas from patients who received the COVID-19 vaccine during pregnancy found no evidence of injury, adding to the growing literature that COVID-19 vaccines are safe in pregnancy.

Released: 12-May-2021 4:45 PM EDT
Pink drinks can help you run faster and further, study finds
University of Westminster

A new study led by the Centre for Nutraceuticals in the University of Westminster shows that pink drinks can help to make you run faster and further compared to clear drinks.

Released: 12-May-2021 4:25 PM EDT
Ancestors may have created 'iconic' sounds as bridge to first languages
University of Birmingham

The 'missing link' that helped our ancestors to begin communicating with each other through language may have been iconic sounds, rather than charades-like gestures - giving rise to the unique human power to coin new words describing the world around us, a new study reveals.

Released: 12-May-2021 4:20 PM EDT
Medical Journal Publishes New Case Reports Describing Newly Identified, Potentially Life-threatening High Potassium Disorder
Hackensack Meridian Health

Researchers at The Mehandru Center for Innovation in Nephrology at Hackensack Meridian Jersey Shore University Medical Center and other authors recently had their new case report article “Metabolic Acidosis, Hyperkalemia, and Renal Unresponsiveness to Aldosterone Syndrome: Response to Treatment with Low-Potassium Diet,” published.

Newswise:Video Embedded orangutan-finding-highlights-need-to-protect-habitat
VIDEO
12-May-2021 4:15 PM EDT
Orangutan Finding Highlights Need to Protect Habitat
Rutgers University-New Brunswick

Wild orangutans are known for their ability to survive food shortages, but scientists have made a surprising finding that highlights the need to protect the habitat of these critically endangered primates, which face rapid habitat destruction and threats linked to climate change. Scientists found that the muscle mass of orangutans on the island of Borneo in Southeast Asia was significantly lower when less fruit was available. That’s remarkable because orangutans are thought to be especially good at storing and using fat for energy, according a Rutgers-led study in the journal Scientific Reports.

Released: 12-May-2021 3:50 PM EDT
UNH Research Estimates 1.4 Million Children Have Yearly Violence-Related Medical Visits
University of New Hampshire

A national report from the University of New Hampshire shows close to one and a half million children each year visit a doctor, emergency room or medical facility as a result of an assault, abuse, crime or other form of violence. This is four times higher than previous estimates based only on data from U.S. emergency rooms for violence-related treatment.

Newswise: 264507_web.jpg
Released: 12-May-2021 3:50 PM EDT
Petting therapy dogs enhances thinking skills of stressed college students
Washington State University

For college students under pressure, a dog may be the best stress fighter around.

Released: 12-May-2021 3:45 PM EDT
Parks not only safe, but essential during the pandemic
Drexel University

Parks played an important role for people seeking respite from the toll of social isolation during the pandemic, and according to new research from Drexel University, they did so without increasing the spread of COVID-19.

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Embargo will expire: 18-May-2021 11:00 AM EDT Released to reporters: 12-May-2021 3:35 PM EDT

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Released: 12-May-2021 3:25 PM EDT
Building better beans to fight food insecurity
Michigan State University

As climate change heats up the air and land making them hotter and dryer, warmer nighttime temperatures make it more difficult to grow beans -- a critical source of protein for populations. Researchers are working against this to build more resilient beans.

Newswise: Pandemic Has 'Severely Weakened Surgical Innovation Pipeline'
Released: 12-May-2021 3:15 PM EDT
Pandemic Has 'Severely Weakened Surgical Innovation Pipeline'
Johns Hopkins University Carey Business School

In a new study for the journal Surgical Innovation, Associate Professor Toby Gordon of the Johns Hopkins Carey Business School addresses the ways in which COVID-19 has slowed medical innovation.

Newswise: Backyard chickens, rabbits, soybeans can meet household protein demand
Released: 12-May-2021 3:10 PM EDT
Backyard chickens, rabbits, soybeans can meet household protein demand
Michigan Technological University

In 2020, stores sold out of garden seed, coops and rabbit cages. Meat shortages led many to wonder what to eat for protein when supply chains are disrupted and some people turned to gathering eggs, raising animals and growing their own food. A team from Michigan Tech and the University of Alaska assessed backyard protein sources: They looked at how a typical household with a typical backyard can raise chickens, rabbits or soybeans to meet its protein needs.

Released: 12-May-2021 2:55 PM EDT
Mental health helplines need human-centered solutions
Cornell University

In India today, dozens of phone numbers are available for people who are having a severe mental health emergency. Oftentimes, however, callers experience difficulty in getting connected with someone who will listen to them; sometimes the phone will just ring and ring.

Newswise: How the Body Builds a Healthy Relationship with “Good” Gut Bacteria
Released: 12-May-2021 2:45 PM EDT
How the Body Builds a Healthy Relationship with “Good” Gut Bacteria
University of Utah Health

Research published in Nature reveals insights into how the body maintains balance with “good” gut bacteria that allows these microbes to flourish in the intestine but keeps them out of tissues and organs where they’re not supposed to be.

Newswise: Weizmann Institute Scientists Reveal the Triple Threat of Coronavirus
Released: 12-May-2021 2:40 PM EDT
Weizmann Institute Scientists Reveal the Triple Threat of Coronavirus
Weizmann Institute of Science

Scientists at the Weizmann Institute and the Israel Institute for Biological, Chemical and Environmental Sciences took a novel tack to investigating SARS-CoV-2’s powerful ability to infect, finding that the virus deploys an apparently unique three-pronged strategy to take over the cell’s protein-synthesis abilities. The work could help develop effective Covid-19 treatments.

Released: 12-May-2021 2:20 PM EDT
New research may explain shortages in STEM careers
University of Georgia

A new study by the University of Georgia revealed that more college students change majors within the STEM pipeline than leave the career path of science, technology, engineering and mathematics altogether.

access_time Embargo lifts in 2 days
Embargo will expire: 17-May-2021 12:05 AM EDT Released to reporters: 12-May-2021 2:15 PM EDT

A reporter's PressPass is required to access this story until the embargo expires on 17-May-2021 12:05 AM EDT The Newswise PressPass gives verified journalists access to embargoed stories. Please log in to complete a presspass application. If you have not yet registered, please Register. When you fill out the registration form, please identify yourself as a reporter in order to advance to the presspass application form.

access_time Embargo lifts in 2 days
Embargo will expire: 18-May-2021 11:00 AM EDT Released to reporters: 12-May-2021 1:50 PM EDT

A reporter's PressPass is required to access this story until the embargo expires on 18-May-2021 11:00 AM EDT The Newswise PressPass gives verified journalists access to embargoed stories. Please log in to complete a presspass application. If you have not yet registered, please Register. When you fill out the registration form, please identify yourself as a reporter in order to advance to the presspass application form.

Newswise: NK cells with bispecific antibody show activity against lymphoma cells
12-May-2021 1:35 PM EDT
NK cells with bispecific antibody show activity against lymphoma cells
University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center

Cord blood-derived natural killer cells combined with a bispecific antibody displayed potent activity against lymphoma cells in a preclinical study led by MD Anderson researchers.

12-May-2021 1:25 PM EDT
Triple-negative breast cancer more deadly for African American women
Washington University in St. Louis

New research from Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis shows that non-Hispanic African American women with triple-negative breast cancer do not fare as well as non-Hispanic white women with this type of breast cancer. The study demonstrates the need for additional research to address disparities in cancer care and understand whether tumor biology or nonbiological reasons such as systemic racism — or a combination of such factors — may be driving these disparities.

Newswise: Weizmann Institute Optogeneticists Use Mosquito Rhodopsins to Boost Brain Research
Released: 12-May-2021 1:10 PM EDT
Weizmann Institute Optogeneticists Use Mosquito Rhodopsins to Boost Brain Research
Weizmann Institute of Science

The Weizmann Institute’s Prof. Ofer Yizhar and colleagues used mosquito rhodopsins to create an optogenetics tool that is more precise, selective, and controllable than current techniques. In addition to increasing our understanding of the brain and advancing the field of optogenetics, the technology could lead to improved therapies for neurological and psychiatric conditions.

Released: 12-May-2021 1:05 PM EDT
Mutation Profile of Acral Nevi Differs from Acral Melanoma, Moffitt Researchers Say
Moffitt Cancer Center

In a new study published in JAMA Dermatology, Moffitt Cancer Center researchers report on the mutation profile of acral nevi and describe differences between acral nevi and acral melanoma.

Newswise: Tiny, Wireless, Injectable Chips Use Ultrasound to Monitor Body Processes
Released: 12-May-2021 1:05 PM EDT
Tiny, Wireless, Injectable Chips Use Ultrasound to Monitor Body Processes
Columbia University School of Engineering and Applied Science

Researchers at Columbia Engineering report that they have built what they say is the world's smallest single-chip system, consuming a total volume of less than 0.1 mm3. The system is as small as a dust mite and visible only under a microscope. In order to achieve this, the team used ultrasound to both power and communicate with the device wirelessly

Released: 12-May-2021 12:30 PM EDT
Only 17 percent of free-flowing rivers are protected, new research shows
Northern Arizona University

New research published in special issue of Sustainability co-edited by NAU researcher finds that biodiversity commitments will be key to freshwater protection

Newswise: 264701_web.jpg
Released: 12-May-2021 12:05 PM EDT
What does your voice say about you?
University of Göttingen

Everyone has at some point been charmed by the sound of a person's voice: but can we believe our ears? What can a voice really reveal about our character?

Newswise: Compact deployment system makes exploring deep seas easier
Released: 12-May-2021 11:50 AM EDT
Compact deployment system makes exploring deep seas easier
University of Rhode Island

The answers to many of life’s mysteries have been discovered far below the surface of the seas. However, getting to those depths has not been easy. Thanks to a new fiber optic reel system invented by Brennan Phillips, an assistant professor of ocean engineering at the University of Rhode Island, deep-sea exploration is about to get much more affordable and accessible.

Released: 12-May-2021 11:20 AM EDT
Ancient gut microbiomes may offer clues to modern diseases
Joslin Diabetes Center

Scientists are rapidly gathering evidence that variants of gut microbiomes, the collections of bacteria and other microbes in our digestive systems, may play harmful roles in diabetes and other diseases.

Newswise: Study Finds 6⁰C Cooling on Land during the Last Ice Age, With Implications about Future Global Warming
Released: 12-May-2021 11:15 AM EDT
Study Finds 6⁰C Cooling on Land during the Last Ice Age, With Implications about Future Global Warming
Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution

Prior studies have underestimated the cooling in the last glacial period, which has low-balled estimates of the Earth’s climate sensitivity to greenhouse gases. The rather high climate sensitivity is not good news regarding future global warming, which may be stronger than expected using previous best estimates.

Newswise: Research News Tip Sheet: Story Ideas from Johns Hopkins Medicine
Released: 12-May-2021 11:15 AM EDT
Research News Tip Sheet: Story Ideas from Johns Hopkins Medicine
Johns Hopkins Medicine

During the COVID-19 pandemic, Johns Hopkins Medicine Media Relations is focused on disseminating current, accurate and useful information to the public via the media. As part of that effort, we are distributing our “COVID-19 Tip Sheet: Story Ideas from Johns Hopkins” every other Wednesday.

Newswise: 264717_web.jpg
Released: 12-May-2021 10:55 AM EDT
Untangling the brain: new research offers hope for Alzheimer's disease
Arizona State University (ASU)

Since the discovery of Alzheimer's disease over a century ago, two hallmarks of the devastating illness have taken center stage.

Released: 12-May-2021 10:50 AM EDT
Advances in medical imaging enable visualization of white matter tracts in fetuses
King's College London

Researchers from the £12 million Developing Human Connectome Project have used the dramatic advances in medical imaging the project has provided to visualise and study white matter pathways, the wiring that connects developing brain networks, in the human brain as it develops in the womb.


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