Feature Channels: Alzheimer's and Dementia

Filters close
Released: 5-May-2021 5:00 PM EDT
New Method Identifies Tau Aggregates Occurring in Healthy Body Structures
Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania

Researchers used microscopy and machine learning to distinguish tau protein aggregates occurring as part of healthy functions from those occurring in disease

Newswise: Pitt, WashU Awarded $10.7 Million for Alzheimer’s Disease Genetic Research
Released: 5-May-2021 9:15 AM EDT
Pitt, WashU Awarded $10.7 Million for Alzheimer’s Disease Genetic Research
Health Sciences at the University of Pittsburgh

Despite decades of research and investment, the genetic underpinnings of Alzheimer’s disease are still largely unknown, stymieing drug development and early diagnosis efforts. A new $10.7 million, five-year project aims to change that.

Released: 5-May-2021 12:00 AM EDT
$3.5 Million Grant Supports Effort Led by Penn Medicine to Diversify Alzheimer’s Disease Research
Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania

The Pennsylvania Department of Health’s CURE program announced it will award a $3.5M grant to Penn Medicine researchers and community partners to address the underrepresentation of Black adults in Alszheimer’s Disease research. The grant supports the Aging Brain Cohort Dedicated to Diversity (ABCD2) study, a research and training initiative led by David Wolk, MD.

Released: 4-May-2021 2:45 PM EDT
Gene Therapy in Alzheimer’s Disease Mouse Model Preserves Learning and Memory
University of California San Diego Health

Researchers at UC San Diego have used gene therapy to prevent learning and memory loss in a mouse model of Alzheimer’s disease, a key step toward eventually testing the approach in humans with the neurodegenerative disease.

4-May-2021 11:00 AM EDT
New MRI Technique Can Detect Early Dysfunction of the Blood-Brain Barrier Associated With Small Vessel Disease
University of Kentucky

Collaborative research between the University of Kentucky (UK) and University of Southern California (USC) suggests that a noninvasive neuroimaging technique may index early-stage blood-brain barrier (BBB) dysfunction associated with small vessel disease (SVD).

Newswise: Depression in older adults undergoing hip fracture repair associated with delirium after surgery
Released: 4-May-2021 9:00 AM EDT
Depression in older adults undergoing hip fracture repair associated with delirium after surgery
Johns Hopkins Medicine

Screening for even mild depressive symptoms before hip fracture repair may be helpful in predicting which patients are at higher risk of developing delirium after emergency surgery, according to results of a new study by researchers from Johns Hopkins Medicine. The researchers say their findings also add to evidence that symptoms of depression and postoperative delirium may be an early indicator of Alzheimer’s disease, although those findings were not conclusive.

30-Apr-2021 7:00 AM EDT
Retinal changes recorded in rodent models of Alzheimer’s disease
Association for Research in Vision and Ophthalmology (ARVO)

ew research shows retinal cell types are vulnerable to Alzheimer’s pathology, suggesting retinal function may be useful in predicting and diagnosing changes in the brain with Alzheimer’s disease. This study will be presented during the 2021 Annual Meeting of The Association for Research in Vision and Ophthalmology (ARVO), being held virtually this year.

29-Apr-2021 1:15 PM EDT
Does Eating A Mediterranean Diet Protect Against Memory Loss and Dementia?
American Academy of Neurology (AAN)

Eating a Mediterranean diet that is rich in fish, vegetables and olive oil may protect your brain from protein build up and shrinkage that can lead to Alzheimer’s disease, according to a new study. The research is published in the May 5, 2021, online issue of Neurology®, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology.

29-Apr-2021 1:05 PM EDT
Reduced Kidney Function Linked to Increased Risk of Dementia
American Academy of Neurology (AAN)

Chronic kidney disease is when a person’s kidneys progressively lose their ability to filter waste from the blood and eliminate fluids. Now a new study has found that people with reduced kidney function may have an increased risk of developing dementia. The study is published in the May 5, 2021, online issue of Neurology®, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology.

Released: 29-Apr-2021 11:25 AM EDT
Partially sighted may be at higher risk of dementia
Anglia Ruskin University

Older people with vision loss are significantly more likely to suffer mild cognitive impairment, which can be a precursor to dementia, according to a new study published in the journal Ageing Clinical and Experimental Research.

Released: 27-Apr-2021 1:30 PM EDT
New mouse model provides first platform to study late-onset Alzheimer’s disease
University of California, Irvine

University of California, Irvine biologists have developed a new genetically engineered mouse model that, unlike its predecessors, is based on the most common form of Alzheimer’s disease. The advance holds promise for making new strides against the neurodegenerative disease as cases continue to soar.

Newswise: Draining brain’s debris enhances Alzheimer’s therapies in mice
26-Apr-2021 8:00 AM EDT
Draining brain’s debris enhances Alzheimer’s therapies in mice
Washington University in St. Louis

Researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis have found that improving the function of the brain's drainage network, known as the meningeal lymphatics, can make certain experimental Alzheimer’s therapies more effective in mice.

Newswise: Stem cell therapy promotes recovery from stroke and dementia in mice
Released: 21-Apr-2021 2:30 PM EDT
Stem cell therapy promotes recovery from stroke and dementia in mice
University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA), Health Sciences

A one-time injection of an experimental stem cell therapy can repair brain damage and improve memory function in mice with conditions that replicate human strokes and dementia, a new UCLA study finds.

Released: 19-Apr-2021 10:20 AM EDT
Mayo researchers, collaborators identify 'instigator' gene associated with Alzheimer's disease
Mayo Clinic

In a new paper published in Nature Communications, Mayo Clinic researchers and collaborators report the protein-coding gene SERPINA5 may worsen tau protein tangles, which are characteristic of Alzheimer's disease, and advance disease. By combining clinical expertise, brain tissue samples, pathology expertise and artificial intelligence, the team clarified and validated the relevance of the gene to Alzheimer's disease.

Newswise: Experimental Drug Shows Potential Against Alzheimer’s Disease
16-Apr-2021 5:15 PM EDT
Experimental Drug Shows Potential Against Alzheimer’s Disease
Albert Einstein College of Medicine

Researchers at Albert Einstein College of Medicine have designed an experimental drug that reversed key symptoms of Alzheimer’s disease in mice. The drug works by reinvigorating a cellular cleaning mechanism that gets rid of unwanted proteins by digesting and recycling them. The study was published online today in the journal Cell.

Released: 15-Apr-2021 3:40 PM EDT
Protein Linked to ALS/Ataxia Could Play Key Role in Other Neurodegenerative Disorders
University of Utah Health

A new study suggests that some neurological disorders share a common underlying thread. Staufen1, a protein that accumulates in the brains of patients with certain neurological conditions, is linked to amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), or Lou Gehrig’s disease, along with other neurological disorders, including Alzheimer’s, Parkinson’s, and Huntington’s disease, according to University of Utah Health scientists.

Newswise: FAU Researchers Receive Grants to Combat 
Alzheimer’s Disease in Florida
Released: 15-Apr-2021 8:30 AM EDT
FAU Researchers Receive Grants to Combat Alzheimer’s Disease in Florida
Florida Atlantic University

Four researchers from FAU’s Schmidt College of Medicine and Charles E. Schmidt College of Science have received grants totaling $641,818 from the Ed and Ethel Moore Alzheimer’s Disease Research Program.

Released: 14-Apr-2021 1:55 PM EDT
Toxic gas in rat brains shows potential for new dementia treatments
University of Reading

A potential treatment for dementia and epilepsy could look to reduce the amounts of a toxic gas in the brain has been revealed in a new study using rat brain cells.

Newswise: Researchers Discover New Way to Monitor and Prevent Nerve Cell Deterioration after Brain Injury
Released: 13-Apr-2021 11:40 AM EDT
Researchers Discover New Way to Monitor and Prevent Nerve Cell Deterioration after Brain Injury
University Hospitals Cleveland Medical Center

Potential mechanistic link shown between Traumatic Brain Injury and Alzheimer’s disease

Released: 12-Apr-2021 9:00 AM EDT
Treating Sleep Apnea May Reduce Dementia Risk
Michigan Medicine - University of Michigan

People with obstructive sleep apnea who treat their apnea with the commonly-prescribed positive airway pressure therapy were less likely to be diagnosed with dementia.

12-Apr-2021 9:00 AM EDT
Your Neighborhood May Affect Your Brain Health
American Academy of Neurology (AAN)

Study Finds Evidence of More Brain Aging in People Living in Disadvantaged Areas

Newswise: Blood Test for Depression Bipolar Disorder Offers Promise of Personalized Treatment
Released: 8-Apr-2021 8:30 AM EDT
Blood Test for Depression Bipolar Disorder Offers Promise of Personalized Treatment
Indiana University

Worldwide, 1 in 4 people will suffer from a depressive episode in their lifetime. While current diagnosis and treatment approaches are largely trial and error, a breakthrough study by Indiana University School of Medicine researchers sheds new light on the biological basis of mood disorders and offers a promising blood test aimed at a precision-medicine approach to treatment.

Newswise:Video Embedded unique-mini-microscope-provides-insight-into-complex-brain-functions
VIDEO
Released: 5-Apr-2021 1:45 PM EDT
Unique mini-microscope provides insight into complex brain functions
University of Minnesota College of Science and Engineering

Researchers from the University of Minnesota Twin Cities College of Science and Engineering and Medical School have developed a unique head-mounted mini-microscope device that allows them to image complex brain functions of freely moving mice in real time over a period of more than 300 days. The groundbreaking study provides new insight into fundamental research that could improve human brain conditions such as concussions, autism, Alzheimer’s, and Parkinson’s disease, as well as better understanding the brain’s role in addiction.

Released: 2-Apr-2021 12:50 PM EDT
Unusual mechanism in rare mutation associated with Alzheimer’s uncovered by UChicago researchers
University of Chicago Medical Center

A novel mechanism has been identified that might explain why a rare mutation is associated with familial Alzheimer’s disease in a new study by investigators at the University of Chicago.

Released: 2-Apr-2021 10:45 AM EDT
Thirteen new Alzheimer's genes identified in first-of-its-kind human genome study
Massachusetts General Hospital

In the first study to use whole genome sequencing (WGS) to discover rare genomic variants associated with Alzheimer's disease (AD), researchers have identified 13 such variants (or mutations).

Released: 1-Apr-2021 3:15 PM EDT
New research on Alzheimer's Disease shows 'lifestyle origin at least in some degree'
Brigham Young University

For years, research to pin down the underlying cause of Alzheimer's Disease has been focused on plaque found to be building up in the brain in AD patients.

Released: 26-Mar-2021 3:15 PM EDT
Signals from muscle protect from dementia
St. Jude Children's Research Hospital

How do different parts of the body communicate? Scientists at St. Jude are studying how signals sent from skeletal muscle affect the brain.

Released: 24-Mar-2021 4:25 PM EDT
Midlife loneliness is a risk factor for Dementia and Alzheimer's disease
Boston University School of Medicine

Being persistently lonely during midlife (ages 45-64) appears to make people more likely to develop dementia and Alzheimer's Disease (AD) later in life. However, people who recover from loneliness, appear to be less likely to suffer from dementia, compared to people who have never felt lonely.

Released: 23-Mar-2021 3:20 PM EDT
Dementia death risk is higher among the socioeconomically deprived
Queen Mary University of London

A large proportion of dementia deaths in England and Wales may be due to socioeconomic deprivation, according to new research led by Queen Mary University of London.

Newswise: BMI1, a promising gene to protect against Alzheimer's disease
Released: 23-Mar-2021 3:15 PM EDT
BMI1, a promising gene to protect against Alzheimer's disease
Universite de Montreal

An Canadian molecular biologist a discovers a new function for BMI1, which is known to counteract brain aging.

Newswise: Exercise Boosts Blood Flow to The Brain, Study Finds
Released: 23-Mar-2021 9:00 AM EDT
Exercise Boosts Blood Flow to The Brain, Study Finds
UT Southwestern Medical Center

DALLAS – March 23, 2021 – It’s not just your legs and heart that get a workout when you walk briskly; exercise affects your brain as well. A new study by researchers at UT Southwestern shows that when older adults with mild memory loss followed an exercise program for a year, the blood flow to their brains increased. The results were published online today in the Journal of Alzheimer’s Disease.

19-Mar-2021 9:50 AM EDT
CHOP Researchers Find Supplement Prevents Strokes in Patients with Rare Genetic Disorder
Children's Hospital of Philadelphia

Researchers have discovered that a widely used nutritional supplement may significantly reduce the risk of fatal strokes caused by a rare genetic disorder. Additionally, the findings suggest that the supplement could be used to both block precipitation of and break up the formation of amyloid plaque deposits, a common feature found in serious forms of dementia.

Newswise: brainagingjpg.jpg?itok=CxpetJEd&c=f6df002c235f4f5d3a4322b650f99985
Released: 18-Mar-2021 3:00 PM EDT
Could leak in blood-brain barrier cause poor memory?
University of Washington School of Medicine

One of the keys to having a healthy brain at any age is having a healthy blood-brain barrier, a complex interface of blood vessels that run through the brain. Research shows the blood-brain barrier leaks as we age, and we lose cells called pericytes. But could this leak and the difficulties in recall be the early stages of Alzheimer’s disease?

Released: 18-Mar-2021 9:35 AM EDT
National Eye Institute launches data portal for macular degeneration research
NIH, National Eye Institute (NEI)

The National Eye Institute (NEI) Data Commons now enables researchers to access data from patients with macular degeneration who participated in the Age-related Eye Disease Study 2 (AREDS2). The database complements newly available stem cell lines created by the New York Stem Cell Foundation Research Institute (NYSCF) from blood cells of AREDS2 study participants.

Newswise: Research News Tip Sheet: Story Ideas from Johns Hopkins Medicine
Released: 17-Mar-2021 11:00 AM EDT
Research News Tip Sheet: Story Ideas from Johns Hopkins Medicine
Johns Hopkins Medicine

During the COVID-19 pandemic, Johns Hopkins Medicine Media Relations is focused on disseminating current, accurate and useful information to the public via the media. As part of that effort, we are distributing our “COVID-19 Tip Sheet: Story Ideas from Johns Hopkins” every other Wednesday.

Newswise: Brain Disease Research Reveals Differences Between Sexes
11-Mar-2021 2:35 PM EST
Brain Disease Research Reveals Differences Between Sexes
American Institute of Physics (AIP)

In APL Bioengineering, University of Maryland scientists highlight a growing body of research suggesting sex differences play roles in how patients respond to brain diseases, as well as multiple sclerosis, motor neuron disease, and other brain ailments. They are urging their colleagues to remember those differences when researching treatments and cures.

Released: 16-Mar-2021 8:05 AM EDT
MCI Helper e-newsletter to aid Mild Cognitive Impairment patients, says Dr. Leslie Norins, of MCI911.com
MCI 911

Despite the absence of a curative drug, improvements in MCI may be possible though use of substances and tactics published throughout medical journals and summarized here.

Newswise: Alzheimer’s Disease: Modifying Value Frameworks to Evaluate Current and Emerging Interventions
Released: 15-Mar-2021 5:05 AM EDT
Alzheimer’s Disease: Modifying Value Frameworks to Evaluate Current and Emerging Interventions
ISPOR—The Professional Society for Health Economics and Outcomes Research

Value & Outcomes Spotlight, a bimonthly ISPOR news publication for the global health economics and outcomes research community, announced the publication of a special supplement exploring value assessment of new interventions in Alzheimer’s disease.

9-Mar-2021 8:05 AM EST
New study provides insights into architecture of abnormal protein deposits in brain disorders
Case Western Reserve University

Scientists at the Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine have determined the structure of protein “fibrils” linked to Lou Gehrig’s disease and other neurodegenerative disorders—findings that provide clues to how toxic proteins clump and spread between nerve cells in the brain.

Released: 11-Mar-2021 2:55 PM EST
Scientists Discover Cellular Stress Enzyme That Might Play Key Role in Neurodegenerative Diseases Such as ALS
Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health

An enzyme called MARK2 has been identified as a key stress-response switch in cells in a study by researchers at Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health.

Newswise: Riding The Wave to Memory-Forming Genetics
Released: 10-Mar-2021 11:35 AM EST
Riding The Wave to Memory-Forming Genetics
UT Southwestern Medical Center

UT Southwestern scientists have identified key genes involved in brain waves that are pivotal for encoding memories. The findings, published online this week in Nature Neuroscience, could eventually be used to develop novel therapies for people with memory loss disorders such as Alzheimer’s disease and other forms of dementia.

4-Mar-2021 5:10 PM EST
A Trio That Could Spell Trouble: Many with Dementia Take Risky Combinations of Medicines
Michigan Medicine - University of Michigan

People over 65 shouldn’t take three or more medicines that act on their brain and nervous system, experts strongly warn, because the drugs can interact and raise the risk of everything from falls to overdoses to memory issues. But a new study finds that 1 in 7 people with dementia who live outside nursing homes are taking at least three of these drugs.

Newswise: Brain Sensor Offers Alzheimer's Answers
Released: 9-Mar-2021 9:00 AM EST
Brain Sensor Offers Alzheimer's Answers
University of Virginia Health System

Scientists have found an explanation for why Alzheimer’s drugs have limited effectiveness and why patients get much worse after going off of them.

Newswise: Novel Drug Prevents Amyloid Plaques, a Hallmark of Alzheimer’s Disease
Released: 2-Mar-2021 3:05 PM EST
Novel Drug Prevents Amyloid Plaques, a Hallmark of Alzheimer’s Disease
University of California San Diego Health

Researchers at UC San Diego School of Medicine and elsewhere have identified a new drug that could prevent AD by modulating, rather than inhibiting, a key enzyme involved in forming amyloid plaques.

Newswise: Potential drug for Alzheimer’s disease prevention shown to be safe and effective in animals
23-Feb-2021 8:55 AM EST
Potential drug for Alzheimer’s disease prevention shown to be safe and effective in animals
The Rockefeller University Press

Researchers at the University of California San Diego School of Medicine and Massachusetts General Hospital have identified a new drug that could prevent Alzheimer’s disease by modulating, rather than inhibiting, a key enzyme involved in forming amyloid plaques in the brain. The study, which will be published March 2 in the Journal of Experimental Medicine (JEM), demonstrates that the drug is safe and effective in rodents and monkeys, paving the way for future clinical trials in humans.

18-Feb-2021 2:05 PM EST
Study: Treatable Sleep Disorder Common in People with Thinking and Memory Problems
American Academy of Neurology (AAN)

Obstructive sleep apnea is when breathing is repeatedly interrupted during sleep. Research has shown people with this sleep disorder have an increased risk of developing cognitive impairment and Alzheimer’s disease. Yet, it is treatable. A preliminary study released today, February 28, 2021, has found that obstructive sleep apnea is common in people with cognitive impairment. The study will be presented at the American Academy of Neurology’s 73rd Annual Meeting being held virtually April 17 to 22, 2021.

Newswise: Nanoparticles Help Untangle Alzheimer’s Disease Amyloid Beta Plaques
22-Feb-2021 7:00 AM EST
Nanoparticles Help Untangle Alzheimer’s Disease Amyloid Beta Plaques
Biophysical Society

ROCKVILLE, MD – Scientists are still a long way from being able to treat Alzheimer’s Disease, in part because the protein aggregates that can become brain plaques, a hallmark of the disease, are hard to study.

Newswise: 257445_web.jpg
Released: 25-Feb-2021 3:55 PM EST
Study identifies potential link between Soldiers exposed to blasts, Alzheimer's
U.S. ARMY Research Laboratory

Research shows that Soldiers exposed to shockwaves from military explosives are at a higher risk for developing Alzheimer's disease -- even those that don't have traumatic brain injuries from those blasts. A new Army-funded study identifies how those blasts affect the brain.


Showing results

150 of 2230

close
2.07449