Feature Channels: Arthritis

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Released: 3-Jun-2021 12:00 PM EDT
Researchers discover potential new approach to treating psoriatic joint inflammation
UC Davis Health

An international team of researchers, led by UC Davis Health, developed a new therapeutic approach to treating psoriatic arthritis, a chronic inflammatory disease affecting the joints.

Released: 19-May-2021 3:20 PM EDT
In severe ankle arthritis, total ankle replacement yields better function than ankle arthrodesis
Wolters Kluwer Health: Lippincott

For patients with severe arthritis of the ankle, total ankle arthroplasty (TAA) provides better long-term function than ankle arthrodesis (AA), reports a study in The Journal of Bone & Joint Surgery. The journal is published in the Lippincott portfolio in partnership with Wolters Kluwer.

Newswise: Gout Treatment Success Doubled by Combining Two Drugs, Study Finds
Released: 11-May-2021 9:00 AM EDT
Gout Treatment Success Doubled by Combining Two Drugs, Study Finds
Michigan Medicine - University of Michigan

If left untreated, gout can cause severe disability. But unlike rheumatoid arthritis, there are only a handful of ways to treat it. Researchers say a combination of two existing drugs disrupts antibody production and doubles treatment efficacy.

Released: 10-May-2021 9:30 AM EDT
Patient support programs for painful conditions may reduce opioid use
Michigan Medicine - University of Michigan

Programs that provide ongoing support to patients with painful conditions and complex medication regimens may also help them avoid using potentially risky opioid pain medications, or reduce the amount they use, a new study finds.

20-Apr-2021 9:00 AM EDT
Rapamycin May Exacerbate Age-related Arthritis Despite Life-extending Benefits
Federation of American Societies for Experimental Biology (FASEB)

New research to be presented this week virtually at the American Physiological Society’s (APS) annual meeting at Experimental Biology 2021 explores the positive and negative effects of lifespan-extending drugs on mitochondrial function and age-related osteoarthritis (OA).

Newswise: HSS Hand Surgeon Performs First Surgery with FDA-Cleared Wrist Replacement Implant He Designed
Released: 19-Apr-2021 2:35 PM EDT
HSS Hand Surgeon Performs First Surgery with FDA-Cleared Wrist Replacement Implant He Designed
Hospital for Special Surgery

A hand surgeon at Hospital for Special Surgery in New York City performed the first total wrist replacement with an implant he designed. The device, known as KinematX™, received 510(k) clearance from the FDA in 2020.

Released: 13-Apr-2021 11:20 AM EDT
Modified Nanoparticles Can Stop Osteoarthritis Development
Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania

After a team of researchers showed that a certain enzyme’s presence in cartilage increased significantly in people with osteoarthritis, they targeted it with specially-loaded nanoparticles that stopped the disease’s progression in its tracks.

Newswise: A New Focus on Musculoskeletal Research
Released: 18-Mar-2021 3:55 PM EDT
A New Focus on Musculoskeletal Research
University of Delaware

Dawn Elliott, Blue and Gold Distinguished Professor of Biomedical Engineering at the University of Delaware, has won an $11.8 million grant from the National Institutes of Health to establish the Delaware Center for Musculoskeletal Research -- an NIH-designated Center of Biomedical Research Excellence (COBRE). From tendonitis to osteoarthritis, the center will focus on uncovering what happens at the cellular level when injuries and inflammation occur and will test potential therapeutic interventions.

Released: 8-Mar-2021 8:05 AM EST
Tocilizumab cuts mortality risk in severely ill COVID-19 patients finds new trial conducted in India
University of Bristol

Tocilizumab, an anti-inflammatory drug used to treat rheumatoid arthritis, improves outcomes in severely ill COVID-19 patients, finds the results of a new trial conducted in hospitals across India — one of the world’s most ethnically diverse countries.

Newswise: Common Bacteria Modified To Make Designer Sugar-Based Drug
Released: 2-Mar-2021 9:00 AM EST
Common Bacteria Modified To Make Designer Sugar-Based Drug
Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute (RPI)

Envisioning an animal-free drug supply, scientists have — for the first time — reprogrammed a common bacterium to make a designer polysaccharide molecule used in pharmaceuticals and nutraceuticals.

Newswise: Repurposed Arthritis Drug Did Not Significantly Improve Severe COVID-19 Pneumonia
Released: 1-Mar-2021 4:10 PM EST
Repurposed Arthritis Drug Did Not Significantly Improve Severe COVID-19 Pneumonia
University of California San Diego Health

A repurposed drug used to treat arthritis did not significantly improve the outcomes of patients with severe COVID-19 pneumonia. Tocilizumab did not significantly improve clinical status or mortality rate at 28 days for participants who received it compared to a placebo.

Newswise: Treating rheumatoid arthritis with micromotors
19-Feb-2021 10:20 AM EST
Treating rheumatoid arthritis with micromotors
American Chemical Society (ACS)

Researchers reporting in ACS’ Nano Letters have developed magnesium-based micromotors propelled by hydrogen bubbles, which improved rheumatoid arthritis symptoms when injected into the joints of rats.

Released: 22-Feb-2021 11:45 AM EST
Good sleep is just what doctor ordered
University of Washington School of Medicine

In a study released Feb. 22 in JAMA Internal Medicine researchers found that six 20-minute telephone calls over eight weeks coaching participants on how to get better sleep improved their sleep, pain, and daytime function. The improvements in sleep and daytime function persisted 12 months after treatment. One of the lead investigators who has been researching age and sleeping for 40 years offers great tips on getting better sleep. Just because you are aging, does NOT mean your sleep needs to get worse.

Released: 22-Feb-2021 11:20 AM EST
Effective treatment for insomnia delivered in a few short phone calls
University of Washington

In a statewide study of adults over 60 with osteoarthritis, researchers found that effective treatment for insomnia can be delivered in a few short phone calls.

Released: 12-Feb-2021 8:45 AM EST
Lin Han, PhD, receives 2021 Kappa Delta Young Investigator Award for the study of cartilage function, regeneration and disease intervention in osteoarthritis
American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons (AAOS)

The 2021 Kappa Delta Young Investigator Award was presented to Lin Han, PhD, for research on the structure and function of cartilage extracellular matrix (ECM) and its impact on tissue regeneration and disease evolution in osteoarthritis (OA).

Released: 12-Feb-2021 8:35 AM EST
Farshid Guilak, PhD, named Kappa Delta Elizabeth Winston Lanier Award recipient for research in functional cartilage engineering for total joint resurfacing
American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons (AAOS)

The 2021 Kappa Delta Elizabeth Winston Lanier Award was presented to Farshid Guilak, PhD and his co-authors, Bradley T. Estes, PhD, and Franklin T. Moutos, PhD, for their research and development of technology to grow bioartificial cartilage using a patient’s own donor cells and seeding them on a novel scaffold that can be molded to match the shape of a patient’s joint.

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Released: 11-Feb-2021 5:15 PM EST
ACR COVID-19 Vaccine Guidance Recommends Vaccination, Addresses Immunosuppressant Drugs & Patient Concerns
American College of Rheumatology (ACR)

The American College of Rheumatology (ACR) has released its COVID-19 Vaccine Clinical Guidance Summary that provides an official recommendation to vaccinate rheumatology patients with musculoskeletal, inflammatory and autoimmune diseases. Important considerations and caveats on how to approach vaccination are included for patients with high disease activity and/or those taking immunosuppressant treatments.

Released: 10-Feb-2021 2:20 PM EST
Common anti-depressant may be first-ever treatment for osteoarthritis
Penn State College of Medicine

In a new study, scientists have discovered the cellular pathway that leads to osteoarthritis and have identified a commonly used anti-depressant — paroxetine — that inhibits this pathway.

Newswise: Robotics Transforms Knee Replacement Surgery
Released: 29-Jan-2021 9:00 AM EST
Robotics Transforms Knee Replacement Surgery
Geoffrey Westrich, MD

Robotic-assisted knee replacement allows for optimal alignment and positioning of the knee implant, as well as optimal ligament balancing. This is critically important for the best outcome and long-term success of the surgery, according to Geoffrey Westrich, MD, at Hospital for Special Surgery. Such precision could potentially lead to a longer-lasting knee replacement.

Newswise: ‘Smart’ cartilage cells programmed to release drugs when stressed
25-Jan-2021 4:30 PM EST
‘Smart’ cartilage cells programmed to release drugs when stressed
Washington University in St. Louis

Researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis have engineered cartilage cells to release an anti-inflammatory drug in response to stresses such cells undergo when they are compressed during weight bearing and movement.

18-Jan-2021 9:00 AM EST
Study Pins Down Number of Americans with Most Common Form of Lupus
NYU Langone Health

Just over 200,000 Americans suffer from systemic lupus erythematosus, or SLE, a condition in which the body's immune system mistakenly attacks its own healthy tissues, especially joints and skin, a new study shows.

Newswise: 3?ui=2&ik=4c9feb129e&attid=0.1.2&permmsgid=msg-f:1689436482112094860&th=177215878ae0828c&view=att&disp=emb&realattid=def2f7a08013a3409469a49b19fe8882
20-Jan-2021 3:10 PM EST
Do antidepressants help back pain and osteoarthritis?
University of Sydney

Antidepressants are commonly used worldwide to treat pain, however new research from the University of Sydney shows they offer little to no help for people suffering chronic back pain and osteoarthritis and may even cause harm.

Released: 15-Jan-2021 12:20 PM EST
Target Discovered That Halts Osteoarthritis-Like Knee Cartilage Degeneration
Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania

In a mouse study, researchers used nanotechnology and previous knowledge of a protein pathway to significantly reduce knee cartilage degeneration and pain

Released: 8-Jan-2021 9:00 AM EST
New Study Helps Forecast Functional Recovery Time and Return to Activities Following Hip Fracture Surgery
American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons (AAOS)

For patients undergoing surgery for a hip fracture, there are still unknowns regarding the return to pre-facture level of function, specifically in regard to driving and mobility. However, a new article published in the January issue of the Journal of the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons® (JAAOS®) further quantifies these outcomes. The study authors found that patients can expect to regain full functionality within two to three years after hip fracture surgery. The study also looked at the long-term psychosocial limitations of patients compared to peer groups and concluded that socialization may aid in recovery.

Released: 18-Dec-2020 11:20 AM EST
What’s the ‘true’ rate of dislocation after total hip replacement?
Wolters Kluwer Health: Lippincott

The cumulative incidence of hip dislocation following total hip replacement is about 50 percent higher than suggested by simple analysis of hospital data, reports a study in The Journal of Bone & Joint Surgery. The journal is published in the Lippincott portfolio in partnership with Wolters Kluwer.

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Released: 9-Dec-2020 4:15 PM EST
Higher body temperatures still a factor in patients in remission from rheumatoid arthritis
Staffordshire University

A pioneering study carried out among patients in remission from Rheumatoid Arthritis has determined that they display significantly higher temperatures than healthy individuals.

Released: 9-Dec-2020 8:55 AM EST
Rheumatologists Applaud Long-Awaited Updates to Cognitive Care Reimbursement in Medicare Physician Fee Schedule Final Rule
American College of Rheumatology (ACR)

The final rule provides much-needed increases in Medicare reimbursement for the evaluation and management (E/M) services provided by rheumatologists and other cognitive care specialties to Medicare beneficiaries. Healthcare services billed under E/M codes include examinations, disease diagnosis, risk assessments and care coordination.

Released: 9-Dec-2020 8:45 AM EST
Most Favored Nation Drug Pricing Rule Will Harm Patient Access and Jeopardize Practice Stability, Rheumatology Leaders Warn
American College of Rheumatology (ACR)

The American College of Rheumatology (ACR) today warned that the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) interim final rule establishing a “most favored nation” (MFN) payment model for Medicare Part B drugs will dramatically disrupt patient access to critical therapies needed to manage rheumatic diseases and conditions.

Released: 30-Nov-2020 12:05 AM EST
IDSA, AAN, and ACR Release Guidelines for Prevention, Diagnosis, and Treatment of Lyme Disease
Infectious Diseases Society of America (IDSA)

New evidence-based clinical practice guidelines for the prevention, diagnosis, and treatment of Lyme disease have been developed by a multidisciplinary panel led by the Infectious Diseases Society of America, the American Academy of Neurology, and the American College of Rheumatology. Representatives from an additional 12 medical specialties and patients also served on the panel.

9-Nov-2020 10:00 AM EST
HSS Presents Innovative Research at 2020 ACR Annual Meeting
Hospital for Special Surgery

At this year’s American College of Rheumatology virtual meeting, Hospital for Special Surgery (HSS) presented exciting research related to rheumatology and orthopedic surgery. The research focuses on the diagnosis of renal disorders, the risk of venous thromboembolism after total knee replacement (TKR), and the care of pediatric and young adult patients with rheumatologic diseases. There are also studies related to the care of rheumatology patients during the COVID-19 pandemic.

8-Nov-2020 12:00 PM EST
Investigators Discover Unique Immune Cells in Patients with Checkpoint Inhibitor-Induced Arthritis
Hospital for Special Surgery

A study from investigators at Hospital for Special Surgery (HSS) and Brigham and Women’s Hospital in Boston has found that the synovial fluid and blood of people experiencing checkpoint inhibitor-induced arthritis is populated by a type of T cells rarely seen in people with other types of inflammatory arthritis. The findings are being presented at the virtual American College of Rheumatology annual meeting.

7-Nov-2020 6:00 PM EST
HSS Shares Best Practices to Address Health Needs of People with Rheumatic Conditions During Pandemic
Hospital for Special Surgery

HSS shares successful strategies for developing and implementing self-management programs for people with rheumatic conditions at the virtual annual meeting of the American College of Rheumatology.

7-Nov-2020 9:00 AM EST
Children with Arthritis Living in Less Affluent Families More Likely to Report Longer Duration of Morning Joint Stiffness
Hospital for Special Surgery

Children with arthritis affecting five or more joints, called polyarticular juvenile idiopathic arthritis (polyarticular JIA), living in less affluent families were twice as likely to report more than an hour of morning joint stiffness, compared to their counterparts from more affluent families, according to a study by investigators at Hospital for Special Surgery (HSS). Parents and physicians should be aware that morning joint stiffness may indicate early disease symptoms of polyarticular JIA and serve as a more reliable indicator than pain.

Released: 6-Nov-2020 4:00 PM EST
Reducing Dementia in Patients With Rheumatoid Arthritis
Hospital for Special Surgery

The incidence of dementia in patients with rheumatoid arthritis is lower in patients receiving biologic or targeted synthetic disease modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARDs) than in patients who receive conventional synthetic DMARDs, according to a new study. The study was presented at the virtual annual meeting of the American College of Rheumatology.

Released: 6-Nov-2020 9:00 AM EST
American College of Rheumatology Announces 2020 Award Recipients
American College of Rheumatology (ACR)

The American College of Rheumatology (ACR) will recognize the recipients of its 2020 Master of the ACR designation and the Awards of Distinction during the College’s Business Meeting & Awards Ceremony. The Distinguished Fellow Award recipients will be honored at the Fellows-in-Training reception.

Released: 6-Nov-2020 9:00 AM EST
Artificial Intelligence Accurately Detects Radiographic Sacroiliitis in Axial Spondyloarthritis, Improving Diagnosis and Research
American College of Rheumatology (ACR)

New research presented at ACR Convergence, the American College of Rheumatology’s annual meeting, shows that an artificial intelligence-based analysis model enables accurate detection of definite radiographic sacroiliitis in people with axial spondyloarthritis, an advance that could be useful for both diagnosis in the clinic and classification of patients for inclusion in clinical trials.

Released: 6-Nov-2020 9:00 AM EST
Patients Reported International Hydroxychloroquine Shortages Due to COVID-19
American College of Rheumatology (ACR)

A new study shows that patients with rheumatic diseases across Africa, Southeast Asia, the Americas and Europe had trouble filling their prescriptions of antimalarial drugs during the 2020 global coronavirus pandemic, when antimalarials were touted as a possible COVID-19 treatment. Patients who could not access their antimalarial drugs faced worse physical and mental health outcomes as a result. Details of the research was presented at ACR Convergence, the American College of Rheumatology’s annual meeting.

Released: 6-Nov-2020 9:00 AM EST
Therapeutic Drug Monitoring Does Not Improve Remission for Patients Starting Infliximab
American College of Rheumatology (ACR)

New research presented at ACR Convergence, the American College Rheumatology’s annual meeting, showed that patients with rheumatic diseases whose infliximab treatment was individually assessed and adjusted with a new strategy called therapeutic drug monitoring did not achieve remission at higher rates compared to those who received standard care.

Released: 6-Nov-2020 9:00 AM EST
COVID-19 Infection Rates Low in People with Rheumatic Diseases, Most Report Mild Illness
American College of Rheumatology (ACR)

A new study shows that the COVID-19 infection incidence has been low in people with rheumatic diseases, and most of those infected experience a mild course of illness. Additionally, fatalities have been low among rheumatic disease patients infected with COVID-19. Details of this research was presented at ACR Convergence, the American College of Rheumatology’s annual meeting.

Released: 6-Nov-2020 9:00 AM EST
Key Features of Chronic Nonbacterial Osteomyelitis, a Disease Affecting Children and Young Adults, Identified in Groundbreaking Study
American College of Rheumatology (ACR)

New research presented at ACR Convergence, the American College of Rheumatology’s annual meeting, identified key clinical features of chronic nonbacterial osteomyelitis (CNO), which leads to an important step toward the development of much-needed classification criteria for a disease that affects children and young adults worldwide.

Released: 6-Nov-2020 9:00 AM EST
Global Survey Reveals that Few Children with Rheumatic Disease Report Contracting COVID-19, None Hospitalized
American College of Rheumatology (ACR)

Results from a large, international survey shows that only a small fraction of children with rheumatic diseases reported contracting COVID-19. Those who did become infected, all had benign outcomes and did not develop significant complications, despite the fact that most children were taking immunosuppressive medications. The research was presented at ACR Convergence, the American College of Rheumatology’s annual meeting.

Released: 6-Nov-2020 9:00 AM EST
New Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis Guideline Emphasizes Disease-Modifying Treatments, Urges Immunizations
American College of Rheumatology (ACR)

The American College of Rheumatology (ACR) will preview a new clinical practice guideline for the management of juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) at ACR Convergence, the ACR’s annual meeting. The new recommendations include treatments for systemic JIA, oligoarthritis, TMJ arthritis, and recommendations for medication monitoring and immunizations.

Released: 6-Nov-2020 9:00 AM EST
Black Patients with RA Less Likely to Receive a Biologic, More Likely to Be Treated with Glucocorticoids Than Whites
American College of Rheumatology (ACR)

A new study reveals that Black patients with rheumatoid arthritis were less likely to be prescribed a biologic treatment and more likely to use glucocorticoids, which carry a risk of serious long-term side effects. This study highlights ongoing racial disparities in the care of patients with rheumatic disease. Details of the study was shared at ACR Convergence, the American College of Rheumatology’s annual meeting.

Released: 6-Nov-2020 9:00 AM EST
Children with Kawasaki Disease at Higher Risk for Heart Problems More Than 10 Years After They Leave the Hospital
American College of Rheumatology (ACR)

New research shows that children with Kawasaki Disease remain at an increased risk for cardiovascular events more than 10 years after hospitalization for their condition, highlighting the need for long-term heart disease surveillance and risk reduction strategies for these young patients. Details of the study was presented at ACR Convergence, the American College of Rheumatology’s annual meeting.

Released: 6-Nov-2020 9:00 AM EST
Warfarin Use Significantly Increases Risk of Knee and Hip Replacement in People with OA
American College of Rheumatology (ACR)

New research presented at ACR Convergence, the American College of Rheumatology’s annual meeting, shows that use of warfarin, a vitamin K drug widely prescribed to prevent blood clots, is associated with a significantly greater risk of knee and hip replacements in patients with osteoarthritis.

Released: 6-Nov-2020 9:00 AM EST
Oral Methotrexate Significantly Improves Function in People with Primary Knee OA with Inflammation After Only Three Months
American College of Rheumatology (ACR)

A new study presented at ACR Convergence, the American College of Rheumatology’s annual meeting, shows that after three months of treatment with oral methotrexate, adults with primary knee osteoarthritis (OA) had significant improvements in physical function and inflammation, a sign that this inexpensive, generic pill may be an important intervention for knee OA.

Released: 6-Nov-2020 9:00 AM EST
Steroid Injections Do Not Hasten the Need for Knee Replacement When Compared to Hyaluronic Acid Treatments for Adults with Knee OA
American College of Rheumatology (ACR)

New research shows that corticosteroid injections for knee OA treatment do not hasten a patient’s progression to a total knee replacement when compared with hyaluronic acid injections. Details of this study was presented at ACR Convergence, the American College of Rheumatology’s annual meeting.

Released: 6-Nov-2020 9:00 AM EST
Hydroxychloroquine Not Linked to Longer Heart Rhythm Intervals in Rheumatoid Arthritis or Lupus Patients
American College of Rheumatology (ACR)

New research presented at ACR Convergence, the American College of Rheumatology’s annual meeting, discovers that use of hydroxychloroquine does not cause any significant differences in QTc length or prolonged QTc in people with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) or systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE).

Released: 6-Nov-2020 9:00 AM EST
New Rheumatoid Arthritis Guideline Emphasizes Maximizing Methotrexate and Biologics, Minimizing Steroids
American College of Rheumatology (ACR)

The American College of Rheumatology (ACR) will preview its 2020 Guideline for the Management of Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA) at ACR Convergence, the ACR’s annual meeting. The comprehensive, clinical recommendations for pharmacologic treatment of RA includes important updates to the previous guideline released in 2015.

Released: 6-Nov-2020 9:00 AM EST
Minority Patients with Rheumatic Diseases Have Worse COVID-19 Outcomes, More Likely to Be Hospitalized
American College of Rheumatology (ACR)

New research at ACR Convergence, the American College of Rheumatology’s annual meeting, reveals that people of color with rheumatic disease have worse health outcomes from COVID-19 infection, are more likely to be hospitalized to treat their coronavirus infection, and are more likely to require invasive ventilator treatment.


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