Feature Channels: Behavioral Science

Filters close
Released: 16-Sep-2020 5:30 PM EDT
Vulnerable groups affected by public transit cuts amid pandemic
McGill University

In response to the COVID-19 pandemic, public transport agencies across North America have made significant adjustments to services, including cutting trip frequency in many areas while increasing it in others.

Newswise: Saint Louis University Establishes New Institute for Healing Justice and Equity
Released: 16-Sep-2020 3:20 PM EDT
Saint Louis University Establishes New Institute for Healing Justice and Equity
Saint Louis University

The Institute for Healing Justice and Equity has been established to help eliminate disparities caused by systemic oppression and to promote healing.

Released: 16-Sep-2020 12:50 PM EDT
The unintended consequence of becoming an empathetic person
Michigan State University

People generally want to improve on things like being more emotionally connected to others, but researchers found that this leads to changes in their political souls as well.

Newswise: Devi mangiare! Why culture may be contributing to 
disordered eating among Italian-Australian women
Released: 15-Sep-2020 9:05 PM EDT
Devi mangiare! Why culture may be contributing to disordered eating among Italian-Australian women
University of South Australia

“You have to eat!” It’s a sentiment that illustrates how central food is to Italian culture, but the woman who uttered these words also happens to be struggling with bulimia nervosa.

Released: 15-Sep-2020 5:55 PM EDT
Study suggests financial holdings influenced key votes for house lawmakers
North Carolina State University

A recent study found strong associations between the financial holdings of legislators in the U.S. House of Representatives and how those lawmakers voted on key financial legislation.

Newswise: 242961_web.jpg
Released: 15-Sep-2020 5:35 PM EDT
Teacher stress linked with higher risk of student suspensions
University of Missouri, Columbia

Just how stressed are teachers? A recent Gallup poll found teachers are tied with nurses for the most stressful occupation in America today.

Released: 15-Sep-2020 3:05 PM EDT
Telehealth supports collaborative mental health care in the needs of rural patients
American Academy of Family Physicians (AAFP)

Traditionally, primary care clinics connect patients who have mental health care needs to specialists like psychiatrists in a collaborative care model.

Released: 15-Sep-2020 2:50 PM EDT
UIC to study how adolescent binge drinking impacts adult behavior
University of Illinois at Chicago

The University of Illinois Chicago has received $4.5 million in continuation funding from the National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism to support the UIC site of the national Neurobiology of Adolescent Drinking in Adulthood, or NADIA, consortium.

Released: 15-Sep-2020 12:10 PM EDT
Many women suffering from severe migraine might avoid pregnancy, but should they?
Elsevier

A survey of 607 women who suffer from severe migraine found twenty percent of the respondents are currently avoiding pregnancy because of their migraines.

Newswise:Video Embedded u-team-offers-daily-tips-for-parenting-schooling-and-e-learning-in-a-pandemic
VIDEO
Released: 14-Sep-2020 5:15 PM EDT
U team offers daily tips for parenting, schooling and e-learning in a pandemic
University of Utah

The Behavior Response Support Team (BRST, pronounced “burst), a joint project of the University of Utah’s Department of Educational Psychology and the Granite School District, provides daily tips and teaches skills for managing kids’ behavior amid remote learning, in-person learning and general pandemic conditions. The animated videos, featuring avatars representing diverse children and families, are provided in seven languages and on five social media platforms.

Released: 14-Sep-2020 5:05 PM EDT
New study explores if flirting is real and shows it can work
University of Kansas

Misunderstandings about flirting can potentially result in awkwardness or even accusations of sexual harassment.

Released: 14-Sep-2020 1:25 PM EDT
Facebook political ads more partisan, less negative than TV
Washington State University

More political candidates may be shifting primarily to social media to advertise rather than TV, according to a study of advertising trends from the 2018 campaign season.

Released: 14-Sep-2020 1:10 PM EDT
A Quick Google Search May Help Homework but Harms Grades
Rutgers University-New Brunswick

Students who Google their homework answers may get a short-term boost but at the cost of longer-term harm, according to a new study by Rutgers-New Brunswick psychology professor Arnold Glass in the School of Arts and Sciences.

Released: 11-Sep-2020 5:10 PM EDT
Hoarding and herding during the COVID-19 pandemic
University of Technology, Sydney

Rushing to stock up on toilet paper before it vanished from the supermarket isle, stashing cash under the mattress, purchasing a puppy or perhaps planting a vegetable patch - the COVID-19 pandemic has triggered some interesting and unusual changes in our behavior.

Released: 11-Sep-2020 4:45 PM EDT
Perception matters: Consumers prefer "natural" prevention options
Washington University in St. Louis

New research shows consumers strongly prefer "natural," not synthetic, products to prevent ailments. That presents a dilemma. Medical researchers are racing to develop a vaccine for COVID-19. When they do, how receptive will consumers be?

Newswise: huang-creativity-1630.jpg?itok=Z6SjvMRr
Released: 11-Sep-2020 8:30 AM EDT
Practice Does Not Necessarily Make Perfect When It Comes to Creativity
Stanford Graduate School of Business

If you’re a relentlessly upbeat thinker, you may be enamored of the 10,000-hour rule, which holds that if you simply practice something regularly for a long enough time, you’ll eventually achieve mastery.

Released: 10-Sep-2020 3:25 PM EDT
Hoarding and herding during the COVID-19 pandemic
University of Technology, Sydney

Rushing to stock up on toilet paper before it vanished from the supermarket isle, stashing cash under the mattress, purchasing a puppy or perhaps planting a vegetable patch - the COVID-19 pandemic has triggered some interesting and unusual changes in our behavior.

Released: 10-Sep-2020 3:05 PM EDT
Pillemer: Family estrangement a problem ‘hiding in plain sight’
Cornell University

Karl Pillemer’s new book, “Fault Lines: Fractured Families and How to Mend Them,” published Sept. 8, documents the surprising prevalence of estrangement for the first time. Conducting the first large-scale national survey on the subject, Pillemer found that 27% of Americans 18 and older had cut off contact with a family member, most of whom reported that they were upset by such a rift. That translates to at least 67 million people nationally – likely an underestimate, Pillemer said, since some are reluctant to acknowledge the problem.

Released: 10-Sep-2020 11:05 AM EDT
Colors evoke similar feelings around the world
Johannes Gutenberg-Universität Mainz

People all over the world associate colors with emotions. In fact, people from different parts of the world often associate the same colors with the same emotions.

Newswise: Cash Transfers More Effective than Workforce Training in Improving Lives of Rwandans
Released: 10-Sep-2020 8:45 AM EDT
Cash Transfers More Effective than Workforce Training in Improving Lives of Rwandans
University of California San Diego

In the head-to-head comparison of a workforce-training program and direct cash transfers for Rwandans, cash proves superior in improving economic outcomes of unemployed youths, while training outperforms cash only in the production of business knowledge, according to a new University of California San Diego study.

Newswise: The Marshmallow Test Revisited
Released: 9-Sep-2020 3:50 PM EDT
The Marshmallow Test Revisited
University of California San Diego

Children will wait longer for a treat to impress others, new psychology experiments show.

Released: 9-Sep-2020 11:35 AM EDT
Feeling misunderstood boosts support for Brexit
University of Exeter

Feeling misunderstood by other groups makes people more likely to support separatist causes like Brexit and Scottish independence, new research suggests.

Newswise: A Window Into Adolescence
Released: 9-Sep-2020 11:25 AM EDT
A Window Into Adolescence
University of Delaware

Why do some adolescents take more risks than others? New research from University of Delaware Biomedical Engineer Curtis Johnson and graduate student Grace McIlvain suggests that two centers in the adolescent brain, one that makes them want to take risks and the other prevents them from acting on those impulses, physically mature at different rates and that adolescents with large differences in the rate of development between these two brain regions are more likely to be risk-takers.

Newswise: Study Suggests Unconscious Learning Underlies Belief in God
8-Sep-2020 10:05 AM EDT
Study Suggests Unconscious Learning Underlies Belief in God
Georgetown University Medical Center

Individuals who can unconsciously predict complex patterns, an ability called implicit pattern learning, are likely to hold stronger beliefs that there is a god who creates patterns of events in the universe, according to neuroscientists at Georgetown University.

Released: 8-Sep-2020 6:35 PM EDT
COVID-stress may be hard to beat even with exercise
Washington State University

Exercise has been shown to reduce anxiety and stress, but it may not be enough for the levels caused by COVID-19.

Released: 8-Sep-2020 6:20 PM EDT
Romantic partners influence each other's goals
University of Basel

Over the long-term, what one partner in a two-person relationship wishes to avoid, so too does the other partner - and what one wants to achieve, so does the other.

Newswise: Sanford Health and the University of North Dakota announce behavioral health collaboration
Released: 8-Sep-2020 4:45 PM EDT
Sanford Health and the University of North Dakota announce behavioral health collaboration
University of North Dakota

The Behavioral Health Bridge, a Sanford/UND collaboration, is a series of online modules aimed at helping individuals experiencing common behavioral health conditions related to COVID-19 and promoting behavioral health treatment to address the current needs of people in the community. The partnership’s new website and its associated modules are a free online service. The service is meant to offer scientific and clinically valid information – collected by the partnership team – to members of the community, giving them reliable tips and resources for managing behavioral health concerns during the COVID-19 pandemic. New resources and modules will be added as the partnership continues to grow.

Released: 8-Sep-2020 3:50 PM EDT
Gun owner perceptions about actual firearm dangers suggest opportunities for improving gun safety
UC Davis Health

People who own guns and those living with gun owners are substantially less worried about the risk of firearm injuries than individuals living in homes without guns, says a new study by violence prevention experts at UC Davis Health.

Newswise: Betrayal or Cooperation? Analytical Investigation of Behavior Drivers
3-Sep-2020 9:55 AM EDT
Betrayal or Cooperation? Analytical Investigation of Behavior Drivers
American Institute of Physics (AIP)

When looking at humanity from a macroscopic perspective, there are numerous examples of people cooperating to form various groupings. Yet at the basic two-person level, people tend to betray each other, as found in games like the prisoner’s dilemma, even though people would receive a better payoff if they cooperated among themselves. The topic of cooperation and how and when people start trusting one another has been studied numerically, and in a paper in Chaos, researchers investigate what drives cooperation analytically.

Released: 8-Sep-2020 8:30 AM EDT
Study Highlights Ties Between Racism and Activism in Black Youth
North Carolina State University

A new study finds that experiences with racism are associated with increased social consciousness and social justice activism in Black youth.

Released: 8-Sep-2020 8:00 AM EDT
A pain reliever that alters perceptions of risk
Ohio State University

While acetaminophen is helping you deal with your headache, it may also be making you more willing to take risks, a new study suggests. People who took acetaminophen rated activities like “bungee jumping off a tall bridge” as less risky than people who took a placebo.

Newswise: Why You Should be Concerned About What Your Kids Watch During School Closures
Released: 4-Sep-2020 9:00 AM EDT
Why You Should be Concerned About What Your Kids Watch During School Closures
University of Kentucky

As the COVID-19 pandemic persists, children across the country are facing social isolation. With many school districts in the U.S. choosing remote learning, students are likely to consume more mass media. You might be wondering, should parents be concerned?

Released: 4-Sep-2020 5:30 AM EDT
Sociologists Available to Comment on Police Brutality and Racial Inequality
American Sociological Association (ASA)

The murders of George Floyd and Jacob Blake are part of a continuum of police brutality toward Black individuals, which too often ends with murder. Sociologists study how this issue of police violence is related to class, race, and inequality.

Released: 3-Sep-2020 5:05 PM EDT
COVID-19 sparks 12-fold increase in remote delivery of mental health care across the US
Virginia Commonwealth University (VCU)

The COVID-19 pandemic has spurred a remarkable number of psychologists across the United States to shift to delivering mental health care to patients remotely, according to a national study led by researchers at Virginia Commonwealth University.

Newswise: Researchers say job candidates are rated lower in virtual interviews
Released: 3-Sep-2020 4:45 PM EDT
Researchers say job candidates are rated lower in virtual interviews
Missouri University of Science and Technology

New research provides some of the first solid evidence that people who watch a virtual job interview rate the candidate substantially lower than those who watch the same interview in person.Researchers at Missouri S&T published a study with their findings in the International Journal of Human-Computer Interaction called “Just Sit Back and Watch: Large Disparities between Video and Face-to-face Interview Observers in Applicant Ratings.

Released: 3-Sep-2020 3:40 PM EDT
Personal success more appreciated than team dominance in sports, business
Cornell University

People enjoy witnessing extraordinary individuals – from athletes to CEOs –extend long runs of dominance in their fields, but they aren’t as interested in seeing similar streaks of success by teams or groups, according to new research from Cornell University.

Released: 3-Sep-2020 2:50 PM EDT
'Attack Helicopters' an online sub-culture to watch out for
Queensland University of Technology

While 'trolls' have been around almost as long as the Internet, 'Incels' are a more recent and distinctly different cyber sub-culture which warrants more study says a QUT researcher.

1-Sep-2020 12:25 PM EDT
When Doing Good Boosts Health, Well-Being
American Psychological Association (APA)

Performing acts of kindness and helping other people can be good for people’s health and well-being, according to research published by the American Psychological Association. But not all good-hearted behavior is equally beneficial to the giver. The strength of the link depends on many factors, including the type of kindness, the definition of well-being, and the giver’s age, gender and other demographic factors.

Newswise: 241945_web.jpg
Released: 2-Sep-2020 6:05 PM EDT
COVID-19 and the threat to American voting rights
Mary Ann Liebert

he COVID-19 pandemic has illuminated three main pathologies of American voting rights, according to Richard Hasen. The pandemic has revealed the lack of systematic and uniform protection of voting rights in the United States, as described in the peer-reviewed Election Law Journal.

Released: 2-Sep-2020 10:00 AM EDT
Adjusting Jailed Women’s Beliefs about Their Friends’ Substance Use May Help Reduce Their Drinking and Risk of Reoffending
Research Society on Alcoholism

Brief interventions can potentially reduce incarcerated women’s alcohol use when they leave jail, according to a new study.

26-Aug-2020 1:05 PM EDT
Teens Who Think Their Parents Are Loving Are Less Likely to Be Cyberbullies
New York University

Adolescents who perceive their parents to be loving and supportive are less likely to engage in cyberbullying, according to a new study by researchers at NYU Rory Meyers College of Nursing.

Released: 1-Sep-2020 3:35 PM EDT
Healthier Eating Is Possible Even During a Pandemic, If You Simply Talk to Yourself
Association for Psychological Science

Research published in the journal Clinical Psychological Science, however, offers a relatively simple technique to resist temptations and make better food choices: Talk to yourself in the third person.

Released: 1-Sep-2020 12:05 PM EDT
Early COVID-19 news coverage amplified political divide
University of Michigan

Newspaper coverage of COVID-19 is at least as politicized and polarized as climate change coverage, say University of Michigan researchers.

Released: 1-Sep-2020 8:55 AM EDT
FSU launches new level of professional certification on trauma and resilience
Florida State University

Florida State University's College of Social Work recently launched a new level in its successful Professional Certification in Trauma and Resilience online series.

Newswise: 241624_web.jpg
Released: 31-Aug-2020 5:20 PM EDT
Aspirated consonants may promote the spread of COVID-19, RUDN University linguist says
RUDN University

According to a linguist from RUDN University, the number of COVID-19 cases in a country might be related to the existence of aspirated consonants in its main language of communication.

Released: 31-Aug-2020 3:40 PM EDT
Atheists are more likely to sleep better than Catholics and Baptists
American Academy of Sleep Medicine (AASM)

A new study of sleep, religious affiliation, and perceptions of heaven found that atheists and agnostics are significantly more likely to be better sleepers than Catholics and Baptists.

Newswise: Is being generous the next beauty trend?
Released: 31-Aug-2020 11:15 AM EDT
Is being generous the next beauty trend?
Indiana University

Research from Indiana University found that more attractive people are more likely to be givers, and givers are rated as more attractive.

Released: 31-Aug-2020 8:30 AM EDT
People love winning streaks by individuals — teams, not so much
Ohio State University

People enjoy witnessing extraordinary individuals – from athletes to CEOs – extend long runs of dominance in their fields, a new study suggests. But they aren’t as interested in seeing similar streaks of success by teams or groups.


Showing results

150 of 5919

close
1.77248