Feature Channels: Biotech

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Newswise: New Biosensor Visualizes Stress in Living Plant Cells in Real Time
Released: 1-Jun-2020 6:05 PM EDT
New Biosensor Visualizes Stress in Living Plant Cells in Real Time
University of California San Diego

Plant biologists have developed a nanosensor that monitors mechanisms related to stress and drought. The new biosensor allows researchers to analyze changes in real time involving specific kinases, which are known to be activated in response to drought conditions.

Released: 29-May-2020 1:35 PM EDT
Bangladeshi eggplant farmers reap rewards via genetics
Cornell University

Farmers in Bangladesh achieved significantly higher yields and revenues by growing insect-resistant, genetically engineered eggplant, a new Cornell study has found.

Released: 28-May-2020 6:10 PM EDT
Balancing the economy while saving the planet
Technical University of Denmark

If you make your bio-product 100% sustainable it may be way too expensive to produce.

Released: 26-May-2020 8:55 AM EDT
Sexton Biotechnologies and Ikeda Scientific Provide Human Platelet Lysate to Japanese Regenerative Medicine Product Manufacturers
Sexton Biotechnologies

Sexton Biotechnologies pathogen reduced hPL confirmed by PMDA as human derived raw material for regen med products.

Newswise: This COVID-19 Detector Has Berkeley Lab Roots
Released: 20-May-2020 5:15 PM EDT
This COVID-19 Detector Has Berkeley Lab Roots
Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

A technology spun from carbon nanotube sensors discovered 20 years ago by Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab) scientists could one day help healthcare providers test patients for COVID-19, the disease caused by the coronavirus SARS-CoV-2.

Newswise: Nanobowls serve up chemotherapy drugs to cancer cells
15-May-2020 10:15 AM EDT
Nanobowls serve up chemotherapy drugs to cancer cells
American Chemical Society (ACS)

For decades, scientists have explored the use of liposomes –– hollow spheres made of lipid bilayers –– to deliver chemotherapy drugs to tumor cells. Now, researchers report in ACS’ Nano Letters a way to stabilize liposomes by embedding a stiff nanobowl in their inner cavity.

Newswise: Lawrence Livermore scientists part of three-institution team working to develop vaccine for tularemia
Released: 18-May-2020 6:05 AM EDT
Lawrence Livermore scientists part of three-institution team working to develop vaccine for tularemia
Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

Two LLNL biomedical scientists who have worked for more than eight years to develop a tularemia vaccine are part of a three-institution team that has been funded to bring their candidate vaccine to readiness for use

Released: 14-May-2020 3:40 PM EDT
Coronavirus outbreak trending topics - See the Coronavirus Channel
Newswise

Research and experts on the symptoms and spread of COVID-19, impact on global trade and financial markets, public health response, search for an effective treatment, and more

Newswise: Minimum energy requirements for microbial communities to live predicted
Released: 6-May-2020 8:05 AM EDT
Minimum energy requirements for microbial communities to live predicted
University of Warwick

A microbial community is a complex, dynamic system composed of hundreds of species and their interactions, they are found in oceans, soil, animal guts and plant roots. Each system feeds the Earth’s ecosystem and their own growth, as they each have their own metabolism that underpin biogeochemical cycles.

Released: 5-May-2020 9:50 AM EDT
Intensive farming increases risk of epidemics, warn scientists
University of Sheffield

Research from the University of Sheffield and the University of Bath has discovered how a common pathogen is able to infect both cattle and humans

Newswise: UAB biotechnology aids hunt for novel COVID-19 DNA vaccine
Released: 4-May-2020 4:55 PM EDT
UAB biotechnology aids hunt for novel COVID-19 DNA vaccine
University of Alabama at Birmingham

The Earle A. Chiles Research Institute is using the protein purification technology from TriAltus Bioscience to purify the spike protein of the COVID-19 virus. The protein will be used to measure the effectiveness of a new DNA vaccine, intended to evoke an immune response against the spike protein.

Newswise: For two UB scientists, love means studying their daughter’s rare disease
Released: 4-May-2020 1:50 PM EDT
For two UB scientists, love means studying their daughter’s rare disease
University at Buffalo

Few people in the world would have understood what it meant. But when doctors diagnosed 2-year-old Yuna Lee with FOXG1 syndrome, her parents recognized the disease immediately. The rare genetic disorder explained Yuna’s seizures. It explained why Yuna hadn’t yet learned to talk. It explained why she struggled to sit up.

4-May-2020 11:00 AM EDT
Eleven human genomes in nine days
University of California, Santa Cruz

UC Santa Cruz researchers are helping drive advances in human genome assembly to make the process better, faster, and cheaper. They plan to leverage these innovations to create a reference genome more representative of human diversity.

Newswise: Nanodevices for the brain could thwart formation of Alzheimer’s plaques
Released: 30-Apr-2020 9:05 AM EDT
Nanodevices for the brain could thwart formation of Alzheimer’s plaques
Argonne National Laboratory

Researchers designed a nanodevice with the potential to prevent peptides from forming dangerous plaques in the brain in order to halt development of Alzheimer’s disease.

Released: 23-Apr-2020 9:50 AM EDT
Unique System for Using UVC Light to Sterilize Masks in Bulk Developed at Rensselaer
Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute (RPI)

The shortage of critical personal protective equipment (PPE) has been a persistent problem for medical and other front-line workers as they battle the COVID-19 pandemic at close range day after day. A team of researchers at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute has developed a potential solution: a machine that uses ultraviolet (UVC) light to sterilize thousands of protective masks each day, rendering them safe for reuse.

Released: 22-Apr-2020 11:30 AM EDT
Tiny sensors fit 30,000 to a penny, transmit data from living tissue
Cornell University

Cornell University researchers who build nanoscale electronics have developed microsensors so tiny, they can fit 30,000 on one side of a penny. They are equipped with an integrated circuit, solar cells and light-emitting diodes (LEDs) that enable them to harness light for power and communication. And because they are mass fabricated, with up to 1 million sitting on an 8-inch wafer, each device costs a fraction of that same penny.

Newswise:Video Embedded video-more-than-baby-debuts-ultrasound-is-used-to-deliver-drugs-treat-tremors
VIDEO
Released: 22-Apr-2020 10:00 AM EDT
Video -- More Than Baby Debuts: Ultrasound Is Used To Deliver Drugs, Treat Tremors
Acoustical Society of America (ASA)

Ultrasound is probably most associated with a parent’s first glimpse of a baby in the womb. However, a new video from the Acoustical Society of America showcases the technology’s abilities to do more than show images of our insides. This video is the second in a series celebrating the International Year of Sound.

Newswise: 229394_web.jpg
Released: 16-Apr-2020 3:35 PM EDT
Psychedelic compound from magic mushrooms produced in yeast
Technical University of Denmark

Psilocybin mushrooms have been found to have minimal harmful effects and could potentially benefit those with depression. But they remain illegal even though they offer a groundbreaking alternative to several under-treated psychological conditions.

Newswise:Video Embedded technologies-converge-on-interacting-surfaces-in-protein-complexes
VIDEO
9-Apr-2020 4:00 PM EDT
Technologies Converge on Interacting Surfaces in Protein Complexes
Stowers Institute for Medical Research

Researchers at the Stowers Institute for Medical Research have fine-tuned a method to pinpoint surfaces within large multi-protein complexes that are close to, and likely to be directly interacting with, one another.

Newswise: Foxglove plants produce heart medicine. Can science do it better?
Released: 13-Apr-2020 11:05 AM EDT
Foxglove plants produce heart medicine. Can science do it better?
University at Buffalo

Biologist Zhen Wang’s team recently published a pair of papers detailing characteristics of cardiac glycosides in two foxglove species. “This kind of study is important because we first have to know the accurate structure of natural compounds before we can explore their medicinal effects,” she says.

Newswise: 228772_web.jpg
Released: 8-Apr-2020 2:25 PM EDT
Drinking green tea may help with food allergies
Shinshu University

Research findings suggest gut microbes can effect allergic immune responses. Tasuku Ogita who has recently joined Shinshu University is an expert on teas and their effects on gut bacteria.

Released: 7-Apr-2020 2:05 PM EDT
Global Preclinical Data Forum Announces 2020 Negative Prize Award
Cohen Veterans Bioscience

The Global Preclinical Data Forum (GPDF), a partnership of Cohen Veterans Bioscience (CVB), a non-profit research biotech, and the European College of Neuropsychopharmacology (ECNP), is pleased to announce the opening of submissions for the 2020 Best Negative Data Prize competition.

Released: 7-Apr-2020 10:10 AM EDT
Cell-free biotech could drive COVID-19 therapeutics
Cornell University

A biomanufacturing company spun out of Cornell research is seeking to rapidly translate an antibody therapy against COVID-19 by using cell-free biotechnology based on glycoengineered bacteria. And it could scale up the production 10 times faster than conventional methods.

Released: 30-Mar-2020 1:00 PM EDT
U-led human factors consortium improves medical device design
University of Utah

A University of Utah-led consortium to improve the design of medical devices welcomes Rice University as its newest partner. The Human Factors MEdical DevIce Consortium (hfMEDIC) serves as a consulting resource for medical device manufacturers looking to improve usability and safety of their products.

Released: 25-Mar-2020 10:05 AM EDT
New study: Cannabis helps fight resistant bacteria
University of Southern Denmark

Since the discovery of penicillin in 1928 by Sir Alexander Fleming, antibiotics have saved millions of lives from fatal infections world-wide. However, with time bacteria have developed mechanisms to escape the effects of antibiotics - they have become resistant.

Newswise: Adjusting Processing Temperature Results in Better Hydrogels for Biomedical Applications
19-Mar-2020 10:40 AM EDT
Adjusting Processing Temperature Results in Better Hydrogels for Biomedical Applications
American Institute of Physics (AIP)

Biohydrogels have been studied closely for their potential use in biomedical applications, but they often move between sols and gels, depending on their temperature, changes that can pose issues depending on the intended use. In Physics of Fluids, researchers discuss their work studying the effect of temperature on hydrogels. They found that creating hydrogels at room temperature or below results in more robust materials that function more effectively when used in the body.

Newswise: UAH joins supercomputing effort
to find drugs effective against COVID-19
23-Mar-2020 8:45 AM EDT
UAH joins supercomputing effort to find drugs effective against COVID-19
University of Alabama Huntsville

A professor in the Department of Biological Sciences at The University of Alabama in Huntsville (UAH) is part of an effort led by Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) in Tennessee that applies the power of supercomputers to screen compounds for effectiveness against the pandemic COVID-19 virus.

Newswise: UC San Diego Partners with 5 Leading Diagnostics Manufacturers to Boost COVID-19 Testing
Released: 20-Mar-2020 1:55 PM EDT
UC San Diego Partners with 5 Leading Diagnostics Manufacturers to Boost COVID-19 Testing
University of California San Diego Health

Partnering with five diagnostics manufacturers, UC San Diego is significantly ramping up testing for COVID-19, projecting capacity to complete up to 1,500 tests daily within two to three weeks.

Newswise: Self-assembly required: Neutrons probe novel polymer behavior for biomedical materials
Released: 18-Mar-2020 12:40 PM EDT
Self-assembly required: Neutrons probe novel polymer behavior for biomedical materials
Oak Ridge National Laboratory

LSU researchers are using neutron scattering at ORNL to study crystallization-driven self-assembly, a technique for forming nanoscale solid materials from solutions to understand how the technique could be used to craft controlled-shape nanostructures from polymers known as polypeptoids.

Released: 12-Mar-2020 9:30 AM EDT
Rapid Diagnosis Test for Coronavirus COVID-19 Now Available
Surgisphere Corporation

Surgisphere Corporation announces the availability of a rapid diagnostic tool for novel coronavirus.

Released: 10-Mar-2020 9:00 AM EDT
FDA Inks Research Collaboration Agreement with AnaBios Focused on Human Primary Cardiomyocytes
AnaBios

Today, AnaBios announced a Research Collaboration Agreement (RCA) with the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) to study adult human primary cardiomyocytes as a reference for cellular properties and drug-induced effects on cardiac function.

Newswise:Video Embedded polymers-get-caught-up-in-love-hate-chemistry-of-oil-and-water
VIDEO
Released: 27-Feb-2020 2:10 PM EST
Polymers get caught up in love-hate chemistry of oil and water
Oak Ridge National Laboratory

Researchers at Oak Ridge National Laboratory and the University of Tennessee achieved a rare look at the inner workings of polymer self-assembly at an oil-water interface to advance materials for neuromorphic computing and bio-inspired technologies.

Released: 26-Feb-2020 10:25 AM EST
The Tri-Institutional Therapeutics Discovery Institute, Inc. Renews Partnerships with Takeda and Bridge Medicines, LLC
Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center

To date, work done within the Tri-I TDI has resulted in the launch of two New York City–based companies and the licensing of six therapeutic discovery programs.

Newswise: Seeing starch: Novel technique enables gentle observation of biofuel materials
Released: 25-Feb-2020 2:45 PM EST
Seeing starch: Novel technique enables gentle observation of biofuel materials
Oak Ridge National Laboratory

Scientists at the Department of Energy’s Oak Ridge National Laboratory have developed a new method to peer deep into the nanostructure of biomaterials without damaging the sample. This novel technique can confirm structural features in starch, a carbohydrate important in biofuel production.

Newswise: Scientists use neutrons to try to develop better, less costly dental restorations
Released: 21-Feb-2020 3:35 PM EST
Scientists use neutrons to try to develop better, less costly dental restorations
Oak Ridge National Laboratory

Teeth damaged by trauma or disease require treatment to look and feel as good as new, but the restorative materials available to dentists don’t always last and can be costly for patients. Researchers from the University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center's College of Dentistry are using neutrons at ORNL's High Flux Isotope Reactor to change that.

Released: 19-Feb-2020 10:45 AM EST
Random gene pulsing generates patterns of life
University of Cambridge

A team of Cambridge scientists working on the intersection between biology and computation has found that random gene activity helps patterns form during development of a model multicellular system.

Newswise: What is the Best Way to Encourage Innovation? Competitive Pay May be the Answer
Released: 12-Feb-2020 2:30 PM EST
What is the Best Way to Encourage Innovation? Competitive Pay May be the Answer
University of California San Diego

Economists and business leaders agree that innovation is a major force behind economic growth, but many disagree on what is the best way to encourage workers to produce the “think-outside-of-the-box” ideas. New research from UC San Diego indicates that competitive “winner-takes-all” pay structures are most effective.

Released: 4-Feb-2020 11:05 AM EST
Vanderbilt-Ingram Cancer Center Patient First for New Cell Engineering Platform
Vanderbilt University Medical Center

VICC is the first cancer center to enroll a patient in a clinical trial for this new technology developed by SQZ Biotechnologies of Watertown, Massachusetts. The investigational product is generated from the company’s technology that uses high-speed cell deformation to squeeze cells, creating a temporary disruption of their membranes and offering a window for the insertion of tumor antigens.

Newswise: Save Your Soybeans and Corn, Iowa’s ‘Goldilocks’ Period Won’t Last
Released: 3-Feb-2020 8:00 AM EST
Save Your Soybeans and Corn, Iowa’s ‘Goldilocks’ Period Won’t Last
American Institute of Physics (AIP)

Over the past few decades, Iowa’s agriculture has experienced a period of consistently high yields. The perfect distribution and timing of humidity, rainfall and heat have led to bumper crops of corn and soybeans. This “Goldilocks” period is partly due to global warming, but experts believe farmers shouldn’t expect it to last. In Physics Today, scientists Eugene Takle and William Gutowski describe the challenges farmers could expect to see to maintaining high yields if global warming continues along predicted trends.

Released: 30-Jan-2020 4:40 PM EST
UW’s new WE-REACH center to accelerate development of the ‘most exciting’ biomedical discoveries
University of Washington

With $4 million in matching funds from the National Institutes of Health, the University of Washington has created a new integrated center to match biomedical discoveries with the resources needed to bring innovative products to the public and improve health.

Newswise: Speedy Recovery: New Corn Performs Better in Cold
Released: 29-Jan-2020 4:00 PM EST
Speedy Recovery: New Corn Performs Better in Cold
Boyce Thompson Institute

Nearly everyone on Earth is familiar with corn. Literally. Around the world, each person eats an average of 70 pounds of the grain each year, with even more grown for animal feed and biofuel.

Newswise: Biotech courses return to east, west campuses for summer
Released: 29-Jan-2020 9:00 AM EST
Biotech courses return to east, west campuses for summer
American Society for Cell Biology (ASCB)

The American Society for Cell Biology (ASCB) offers two, week-long, hand-on courses to help current or recent PhDs transition into biotechnology, medical technology, or pharmaceutical careers.

Newswise:Video Embedded crab-shell-and-seaweed-compounds-spin-into-yarns-for-sustainable-and-functional-materials
VIDEO
Released: 28-Jan-2020 2:00 PM EST
Crab-shell and seaweed compounds spin into yarns for sustainable and functional materials
Aalto University

Researchers from Aalto University, the University of São Paulo and the University of British Columbia have found a way to make a new kind of fibre from a combination of chitin nanoparticles, extracted from residual blue crab shells and alginate, a compound found in seaweed.

Newswise: Polymer expert Advincula named ORNL-UT Governor’s Chair
Released: 24-Jan-2020 10:10 AM EST
Polymer expert Advincula named ORNL-UT Governor’s Chair
Oak Ridge National Laboratory

Rigoberto “Gobet” Advincula has been named Governor’s Chair of Advanced and Nanostructured Materials at the Department of Energy’s Oak Ridge National Laboratory and the University of Tennessee.

Newswise: Acetone plus light creates a green jet fuel additive
Released: 23-Jan-2020 2:15 PM EST
Acetone plus light creates a green jet fuel additive
Los Alamos National Laboratory

Take biomass-derived acetone—common nail polish remover—use light to upgrade it to higher-mass hydrocarbons, and, voila, you have a domestically generated product that can be blended with conventional jet fuel to fly while providing environmental benefits, creating domestic jobs, securing the nation’s global leadership in bioenergy technologies, and improving U.S. energy security.

Newswise: $25 Million Project Will Advance DNA-Based Archival Data Storage
Released: 16-Jan-2020 10:50 AM EST
$25 Million Project Will Advance DNA-Based Archival Data Storage
Georgia Institute of Technology

The Intelligence Advanced Research Projects Activity’s (IARPA) Molecular Information Storage (MIST) program has awarded a multi-phase contract worth up to $25 million to develop scalable DNA-based molecular storage techniques. The goal of the project is to use DNA as the basis for deployable storage technologies that can eventually scale into the exabyte regime and beyond with reduced physical footprint, power and cost requirements.


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