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Released: 4-May-2022 12:05 PM EDT
MD Anderson Research Highlights for May 4, 2022
University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center

Featured studies include clinical advances with a new combination therapy targeting angiogenesis in platinum-resistant ovarian cancer and a promising immunotherapy combination for kidney cancer, plus laboratory studies that focus on targeting ferroptosis in specific lung cancers, developing chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T cell therapies for blastic plasmacytoid dendritic cell neoplasms, and characterizing racial and ethnic disparities in breast cancer early detection.

Newswise: Sylvester Expert Co-Authors Guidelines for Optimizing Cancer Survivor Nutrition and Physical Activity
Released: 24-Mar-2022 2:15 PM EDT
Sylvester Expert Co-Authors Guidelines for Optimizing Cancer Survivor Nutrition and Physical Activity
Sylvester Comprehensive Cancer Center

More scientific evidence about the importance of nutrition and physical activity for cancer survivors has emerged in the past 10 years, prompting the American Cancer Society (ACS) to update its guidance for physicians and patients.

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Released: 17-Mar-2022 11:00 AM EDT
Younger patients with appendicitis are more likely to have cancer of the appendix
American College of Surgeons (ACS)

From 2004 to 2017, there was an increase in cancer of the appendix in acute appendicitis patients, especially among patients younger than 50 years old.

Newswise: Study: Exposure to Phthalates — the 'Everywhere Chemical' — May Increase Children’s Cancer Risk
Released: 16-Mar-2022 3:05 PM EDT
Study: Exposure to Phthalates — the 'Everywhere Chemical' — May Increase Children’s Cancer Risk
University of Vermont

In a first-of-its-kind study, research from the University of Vermont Cancer Center has linked phthalates, commonly called the “everywhere chemical,” to higher incidence of specific childhood cancers.

Newswise: Pancreatic cancer cells feed off hyaluronic acid
Released: 27-Jan-2022 12:05 PM EST
Pancreatic cancer cells feed off hyaluronic acid
Michigan Medicine - University of Michigan

Hyaluronic acid, or HA, is a known presence in pancreatic tumors, but a new study from researchers at the University of Michigan Health Rogel Cancer Center shows that hyaluronic acid also acts as food to the cancer cells. These findings, recently published in eLife, provide insight into how pancreatic cancer cells grow and indicate new possibilities to treat them.

Newswise: High-fiber diet associated with improved progression-free survival and response to immunotherapy in melanoma patients
20-Dec-2021 8:00 AM EST
High-fiber diet associated with improved progression-free survival and response to immunotherapy in melanoma patients
University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center

Patients with melanoma who reported eating more fiber-rich foods when they began immunotherapy treatment survived longer without cancer growth than patients with insufficient dietary fiber intake, according to new research from The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center published today in Science.

Released: 16-Dec-2021 10:20 AM EST
Belzutifan offers hope for patients with von Hippel-Lindau disease
Michigan Medicine - University of Michigan

The anti-cancer effect of the drug may help those with rare, hereditary cancer syndromes avoid surgeries by shrinking tumors via a daily oral dose.

Newswise: Yale Cancer Center Trial Identifies New Treatment Option for Certain Patients with T-Cell Lymphoma
Released: 13-Dec-2021 3:55 PM EST
Yale Cancer Center Trial Identifies New Treatment Option for Certain Patients with T-Cell Lymphoma
Yale Cancer Center

The final results from a national phase 2 study including researchers from Yale Cancer Center show the drug tipifarnib increased survival rates for patients with relapsed or refractory peripheral T-cell lymphoma (PTCL). The findings are being presented today at the 2021 American Society of Hematology (ASH) Annual Meeting & Exposition in Atlanta, Georgia.

Newswise: Drug combination found to keep chronic lymphocytic leukemia in young patients in remission for several years
9-Dec-2021 10:00 AM EST
Drug combination found to keep chronic lymphocytic leukemia in young patients in remission for several years
Dana-Farber Cancer Institute

Young patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) can enjoy long remissions on the drug ibrutinib, but must stay on it indefinitely to keep the cancer in remission. A new study by Dana-Farber Cancer Institute researchers suggests that a 2.5-year regimen involving ibrutinib and chemoimmunotherapy can provide deep, and lasting remissions of the disease.

8-Dec-2021 4:00 PM EST
Researchers Discover How Cells From Tumors Remain Dormant for Years Before Metastasis Occurs
Mount Sinai Health System

Mount Sinai researchers have solved a major mystery in cancer research: How cancer cells remain dormant for years after they leave a tumor and travel to other parts of the body, before awakening to create metastatic cancer.

Newswise: FDA Approves “Glowing Tumor” Imaging Drug to Better Identify Ovarian Cancer Cells Using Approach Pioneered by Surgeons at the University of Pennsylvania
Released: 30-Nov-2021 1:40 PM EST
FDA Approves “Glowing Tumor” Imaging Drug to Better Identify Ovarian Cancer Cells Using Approach Pioneered by Surgeons at the University of Pennsylvania
Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania

FDA approved an imaging drug known as Cytalux (pafolacianine), which is attracted to ovarian cancer tissue and illuminates it when exposed to fluorescent light, allowing surgeons to more easily find and more precisely remove the cancer.

Newswise: The Medical Minute: Quitting smoking sooner could save your life
Released: 17-Nov-2021 3:30 PM EST
The Medical Minute: Quitting smoking sooner could save your life
Penn State Health

It’s well known that smoking causes lung cancer. But a new study suggests you can lower―or even erase―the risk of dying from lung cancer associated with continuous smoking if you quit when you’re young.

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Released: 5-Nov-2021 3:15 PM EDT
Roswell Park Researchers Identify Key Link Between Stress and Cancer
Roswell Park Comprehensive Cancer Center

Stress can have a significant negative effect on health, but our understanding of how stress impacts the development and progression of cancer is just beginning. A team from Roswell Park Comprehensive Cancer Center has identified an important mechanism by which chronic stress weakens immunity and promotes tumor growth. Their findings, just published in Cell Reports, point to the beta-adrenergic receptor (β-AR) as a driver of immune suppression and cancer growth in response to stress, opening the possibility of targeting this receptor in cancer therapy and prevention.

Newswise: New study shows that different types of cancers are likely to spread to specific areas of the brain
Released: 23-Sep-2021 10:05 AM EDT
New study shows that different types of cancers are likely to spread to specific areas of the brain
Keck Medicine of USC

Brain metastasis occurs when cancer in one part of the body spreads to the brain. The lifetime incidence of such metastatic brain tumors in cancer patients is between 20%-45%, research shows.

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16-Sep-2021 7:00 PM EDT
Gut bacteria might be an indicator of colon cancer risk
University of Washington School of Medicine and UW Medicine

Researchers are finding a link between the increased presence of certain bacteria in a gut biome and colon cancer.

Newswise: Yale Cancer Center Study Shows Stem-Like T Cells Could Aid Immunotherapy in Cancer Treatment
2-Sep-2021 1:00 PM EDT
Yale Cancer Center Study Shows Stem-Like T Cells Could Aid Immunotherapy in Cancer Treatment
Yale Cancer Center

In a new study by Yale Cancer Center, researchers show stem-like T cells within certain lymph nodes could be natural cancer fighters.

Released: 31-Aug-2021 12:50 PM EDT
Mayo Clinic urges cancer patients to seek third dose of mRNA COVID-19 vaccine
Mayo Clinic

Mayo Clinic Cancer Center announced on Tuesday, Aug. 31, that it is following recommendations from the National Comprehensive Cancer Network that encourage cancer patients to receive a third dose of a messenger RNA COVID-19 vaccine. The Moderna and Pfizer COVID-19 vaccines are messenger RNA vaccines.

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Released: 27-Jul-2021 3:55 PM EDT
Heated Chemotherapy Can Help Some Children with Cancer
Michigan Medicine - University of Michigan

Known as HIPEC, the therapy has been available for adults for years at Michigan Medicine. Now it’s an option for kids here, too.

Released: 27-Jul-2021 3:45 PM EDT
Financial Barriers Fell for Some Cancer Survivors After Affordable Care Act
Michigan Medicine - University of Michigan

Younger cancer survivors — those between ages 18 and 64 — faced fewer financial barriers to health care after the Affordable Care Act was implemented than they did before the landmark law took effect, University of Michigan researchers found.

Newswise: Scientists Link Frailty and Neurocognitive Decline in Childhood Cancer Survivors
Released: 20-Jul-2021 5:35 PM EDT
Scientists Link Frailty and Neurocognitive Decline in Childhood Cancer Survivors
St. Jude Children's Research Hospital

St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital scientists have shown that frailty contributes to neurocognitive decline in young adult survivors of childhood cancer.

10-Jun-2021 12:20 PM EDT
Small Numbers of Cells in a Tumor Could Be Key Enablers of Cancer Metastasis
Georgetown Lombardi Comprehensive Cancer Center

Just a small number of cells found in tumors can enable and recruit other types of cells nearby, allowing the cancer to spread to other parts of the body, report Georgetown Lombardi Comprehensive Cancer Center scientists. Working with their research collaborators, the scientists found that ‘enabler cells’ comprise about 20 percent or less of the cells in an aggressive tumor; their small numbers may account for why they are often missed when bulk tissue analyses are used to inform therapeutic decisions.

Released: 11-Jun-2021 4:00 PM EDT
Case study shows patient on ketogenic diet living fully with IDH1-mutant glioblastoma
Boston College

A British man who rejected the standard of care to treat his brain cancer has lived with the typically fatal glioblastoma tumor growing very slowly after adopting a ketogenic diet, providing a case study that researchers say reflects the benefits of using the body's own metabolism to fight this particularly aggressive cancer instead of chemo and radiation therapy.

Released: 27-Apr-2021 3:45 PM EDT
Men's loneliness linked to an increased risk of cancer
University of Eastern Finland

A recent study by the University of Eastern Finland shows that loneliness among middle-aged men is associated with an increased risk of cancer.

Newswise: Breast Cancer Awareness: What Women Must Know
Released: 27-Apr-2021 2:40 PM EDT
Breast Cancer Awareness: What Women Must Know
Newswise

To share important information related to breast cancer, we have compiled some of the latest research news related to breast cancer from top research institutions around the world.

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VIDEO
Released: 26-Apr-2021 2:20 PM EDT
Drug Derived from Kentucky-Grown Plant Shows Promise for Ovarian Cancer Treatment
University of Kentucky

A new study from University of Kentucky Markey Cancer researchers shows that Artemisia annua, a plant that has been traditionally used for its anti-malaria components, shows promise in treating ovarian cancer.

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Released: 21-Apr-2021 9:25 AM EDT
Higher mushroom consumption is associated with a lower risk of cancer
Penn State College of Medicine

Higher mushroom consumption is associated with a lower risk of cancer, according to a new Penn State study.

Released: 10-Apr-2021 8:30 AM EDT
MSK Medical Oncologist Matthew Matasar Featured in the 2021 AACR Annual Meeting Week 1 Press Program
Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center

Research Presented Found that Copanlisib-Rituximab Combination Reduced Lymphoma Progression or Death by Nearly Half in CHRONOS-3 Trial

Released: 17-Mar-2021 9:55 AM EDT
Electromagnetic fields hinder spread of breast cancer, study shows
Ohio State University

Electricity may slow – and in some cases, stop – the speed at which breast cancer cells spread through the body, a new study indicates. The research also found that electromagnetic fields might hinder the amount of breast cancer cells that spread.

11-Mar-2021 10:05 AM EST
Dana-Farber Research Leads to Better Understanding of the Immune System in Kidney Cancer
Dana-Farber Cancer Institute

In two new studies published today in Cancer Cell, researchers from Dana-Farber Cancer Institute and the Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard used the emerging technology of single-cell RNA sequencing to draw a clearer picture of how kidney tumors’ microenvironments change in response to immunotherapy. The researchers believe that this work points to potential targets for new drug therapies.

Released: 17-Feb-2021 7:05 PM EST
Five Years Later: Penn-developed CAR T Therapy Shows Long-lasting Remissions in Non-Hodgkin Lymphomas
Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania

A significant number of non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) patients in a Penn Medicine-initiated clinical trial continue to be in remission five years after receiving the chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T cell therapy Kymriah™, researchers in Penn’s Abramson Cancer Center reported today in the New England Journal of Medicine.

10-Feb-2021 7:30 AM EST
Gene-Based Blood Test for Melanoma Spread Evaluates Treatment Progress
NYU Langone Health

A test that monitors blood levels of DNA fragments released by dying tumor cells may serve as an accurate early indicator of treatment success in people in late stages of one of the most aggressive forms of skin cancer, a new study finds.

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Released: 2-Feb-2021 12:45 PM EST
Year or More Delay Between Abnormal, At-Home Screening and Colonoscopy Increases Cancer Risk
University of California San Diego Health

A new study by researchers at University of California San Diego School of Medicine found delayed time between abnormal stool-based screening and subsequent colonoscopy was associated with an increased risk of a cancer diagnosis and death from colorectal cancer.

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Released: 21-Jan-2021 11:50 AM EST
Much of Earth's nitrogen was locally sourced
Rice University

Where did Earth's nitrogen come from? Rice University scientists show one primordial source of the indispensable building block for life was close to home.

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Released: 10-Dec-2020 9:00 AM EST
Fans May Relieve Breathlessness Associated with Advanced Cancers
Johns Hopkins Medicine

Blowing air from a fan into the face of patients with advanced cancer experiencing breathlessness, and other nonpharmacologic interventions, may offer symptom relief, according to new research directed by Johns Hopkins Kimmel Cancer Center investigators. On the other hand, the investigators found medications, such as opioids, had limited impact in improving breathlessness.

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30-Nov-2020 10:55 AM EST
Cancer cases are rising in adolescents and young adults
Penn State College of Medicine

Cancer cases in adolescents and young adults have risen by 30% during the last four decades, with kidney cancer rising at the greatest rate, according to researchers at Penn State College of Medicine.

Newswise: Personalized drug screens could guide treatment for children with brain cancer
Released: 12-Nov-2020 8:00 AM EST
Personalized drug screens could guide treatment for children with brain cancer
Sanford Burnham Prebys

Scientists at Sanford Burnham Prebys Medical Discovery Institute, University of California San Diego School of Medicine and Hopp Children’s Cancer Center Heidelberg (KiTZ) have demonstrated that personalized drug screens can be used to identify new therapeutic candidates for medulloblastoma. The approach measures the effectiveness of therapeutics using tumor cells obtained from a biopsy and can be performed in a few days—making it one of the quickest sources of information used in clinical decision-making.

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Released: 29-Sep-2020 11:45 AM EDT
Feeling stressed or down in a world with COVID? Try this writing tool
Michigan Medicine - University of Michigan

A new expressive writing tool allows people to put their thoughts and feelings into words to help relieve stress and anxiety. Participants are given a prompt and directed to write for 5-10 minutes, expressing their deepest thoughts and feelings. A computer analyzes keywords and tone to provide feedback.

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Released: 7-Sep-2020 11:00 AM EDT
Researchers Show How Mutations in DNA Packaging Machines Cause Cancer
UT Southwestern Medical Center

DALLAS – Sept. 7, 2020 – Like wrenches made of Legos, SWI/SNF chromatin remodeling complexes tighten or loosen DNA in our cells to control how genes are turned on and made into proteins. When assembled correctly, these complexes play a crucial role in the development of normal tissues, and when broken, they can lead to the development of cancer. These complexes are commonly disrupted by mutations in the genes that encode them – but how this leads to cancer is poorly understood.

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Released: 1-Sep-2020 1:00 PM EDT
Effective Cancer Immunotherapy Further Linked To Regulating A Cell ‘Suicide’ Gene
Johns Hopkins Medicine

Johns Hopkins Medicine researchers have added to evidence that a gene responsible for turning off a cell’s natural “suicide” signals may also be the culprit in making breast cancer and melanoma cells resistant to therapies that use the immune system to fight cancer. A summary of the research, conducted with mice and human cells, appeared Aug. 25 in Cell Reports.

Newswise: LLNL scientists pair 3D bioprinting and computer modeling to examine cancer spread in blood vessels
25-Aug-2020 7:05 PM EDT
LLNL scientists pair 3D bioprinting and computer modeling to examine cancer spread in blood vessels
Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory scientists have paired 3D-printed, living human brain vasculature with advanced computational flow simulations to better understand tumor cell attachment to blood vessels, the first step in secondary tumor formation during cancer metastasis.

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Released: 27-Feb-2020 12:20 PM EST
Cancer survival disparities in minority children, adolescents greater for more treatable cancers
Washington University in St. Louis

Racial and ethnic minority children and adolescents with cancer have a higher risk of death than non-Hispanic white children and adolescents, with evidence for larger disparities in survival for more treatable cancers, finds a new study from the Brown School at Washington University in St. Louis.“The results suggest that there are modifiable racial and ethnic disparities in childhood cancer survival,” said Kim Johnson, associate professor and senior author of “Associations Between Race/Ethnicity and US Childhood and Adolescent Cancer Survival by Treatment Amenability,” published Feb.

Released: 22-Jan-2020 9:00 AM EST
Decline in Late Stage Cancer Diagnoses After Health Reform Law
Health Sciences at the University of Pittsburgh

Advanced stage cancer diagnoses declined following health insurance expansion in Massachusetts, likely due to increased access to screening and diagnostic services that identified cancers earlier, according to new research.

22-Nov-2019 6:00 AM EST
Hibernating Mammals Arouse Hope for Genetic Solutions to Obesity, Metabolic Diseases
University of Utah Health

University of Utah Health scientists say they have detected new genetic clues about hibernation that could lead to better understanding and treatment of obesity and metabolic disorders that afflict millions of people worldwide.

Released: 4-Nov-2019 11:05 AM EST
Fluorescent probes offer fuller view of drug delivery in cells
Cornell University

Selecting the most effective molecules for drug delivery is often a trial-and-error process, but Cornell engineers are providing some precision thanks to a technique that reveals the performance of those molecules inside living cells.

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23-Oct-2019 2:40 PM EDT
Using Artificial Intelligence to Predict Risk of Thyroid Cancer on Ultrasound
Thomas Jefferson University

New study uses machine learning on ultrasound images of thyroid nodules to predict risk of malignancy

Newswise: Creatine powers T cells’ fight against cancer
Released: 18-Oct-2019 12:05 PM EDT
Creatine powers T cells’ fight against cancer
UCLA Eli and Edythe Broad Center of Regenerative Medicine and Stem Cell Research

The study, conducted in mice, is the first to show that creatine uptake is critical to the anti-tumor activities of killer T cells, the foot soldiers of the immune system.

Released: 16-Oct-2019 8:50 AM EDT
Expert Panel: Cancer Treatment Plans Should IncludeTailored Exercise Prescriptions
American College of Sports Medicine (ACSM)

New guidance from exercise oncology experts recommend systematic use of an “exercise prescription” by health care workers and fitness professionals in designing and delivering exercise programs that aim to lower the risk of developing certain cancers and best meet the needs, preferences and abilities of people with cancer. 17 organizations reviewed the latest scientific evidence and offer recommendations about the benefits of exercise for prevention, treatment, recovery and improved survival.

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9-Oct-2019 4:05 PM EDT
Following NCCN Guidelines for Metastatic Breast Cancer Results in Lower Costs for Patients, According to New Study
National Comprehensive Cancer Network® (NCCN®)

Patients pay less out-of-pocket for metastatic breast cancer (MBC) treatment that aligns with recommendations from NCCN Guidelines, according to a new study from the O’Neal Comprehensive Cancer Center at University of Alabama at Birmingham (UAB), published in the October 2019 issue of JNCCN—Journal of the National Comprehensive Cancer Network.

Released: 17-Sep-2019 8:00 AM EDT
First Positive Results in 45 Years: Rhabdomyosarcoma Randomized Clinical Trial Led by Children’s Hospital Los Angeles
Children's Hospital Los Angeles

A randomized clinical trial led at Children's Hospital Los Angeles by Leo Mascarenhas, MD, MS, showed first positive results in rhabdomyosarcoma since 1974.

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Released: 12-Sep-2019 9:00 AM EDT
Failed Cancer Drug Looks Promising For Scleroderma And Other Fibrotic Conditions
Johns Hopkins Medicine

Sixteen years ago, a research group at Mayo Medical School published results showing that a protein called TRAIL can kill cells that cause liver fibrosis but no one seemed to follow up on these findings. Now, researchers at Johns Hopkins Medicine have improved on this protein and shown that it selectively kills cells that cause the hardening of skin associated with scleroderma, effectively reversing the condition in mice genetically engineered to mimic the disease. A report on these results was published earlier this year in Nature Communications.


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