Focus: Cancer Channel Featured Story TOP

Filters close
Released: 27-Apr-2021 3:45 PM EDT
Men's loneliness linked to an increased risk of cancer
University of Eastern Finland

A recent study by the University of Eastern Finland shows that loneliness among middle-aged men is associated with an increased risk of cancer.

Newswise: Breast Cancer Awareness: What Women Must Know
Released: 27-Apr-2021 2:40 PM EDT
Breast Cancer Awareness: What Women Must Know
Newswise

To share important information related to breast cancer, we have compiled some of the latest research news related to breast cancer from top research institutions around the world.

Newswise:Video Embedded drug-derived-from-kentucky-grown-plant-shows-promise-for-ovarian-cancer-treatment
VIDEO
Released: 26-Apr-2021 2:20 PM EDT
Drug Derived from Kentucky-Grown Plant Shows Promise for Ovarian Cancer Treatment
University of Kentucky

A new study from University of Kentucky Markey Cancer researchers shows that Artemisia annua, a plant that has been traditionally used for its anti-malaria components, shows promise in treating ovarian cancer.

Newswise: Higher mushroom consumption is associated with a lower risk of cancer
Released: 21-Apr-2021 9:25 AM EDT
Higher mushroom consumption is associated with a lower risk of cancer
Penn State College of Medicine

Higher mushroom consumption is associated with a lower risk of cancer, according to a new Penn State study.

Released: 10-Apr-2021 8:30 AM EDT
MSK Medical Oncologist Matthew Matasar Featured in the 2021 AACR Annual Meeting Week 1 Press Program
Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center

Research Presented Found that Copanlisib-Rituximab Combination Reduced Lymphoma Progression or Death by Nearly Half in CHRONOS-3 Trial

Released: 17-Mar-2021 9:55 AM EDT
Electromagnetic fields hinder spread of breast cancer, study shows
Ohio State University

Electricity may slow – and in some cases, stop – the speed at which breast cancer cells spread through the body, a new study indicates. The research also found that electromagnetic fields might hinder the amount of breast cancer cells that spread.

11-Mar-2021 10:05 AM EST
Dana-Farber Research Leads to Better Understanding of the Immune System in Kidney Cancer
Dana-Farber Cancer Institute

In two new studies published today in Cancer Cell, researchers from Dana-Farber Cancer Institute and the Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard used the emerging technology of single-cell RNA sequencing to draw a clearer picture of how kidney tumors’ microenvironments change in response to immunotherapy. The researchers believe that this work points to potential targets for new drug therapies.

Released: 17-Feb-2021 7:05 PM EST
Five Years Later: Penn-developed CAR T Therapy Shows Long-lasting Remissions in Non-Hodgkin Lymphomas
Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania

A significant number of non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) patients in a Penn Medicine-initiated clinical trial continue to be in remission five years after receiving the chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T cell therapy Kymriah™, researchers in Penn’s Abramson Cancer Center reported today in the New England Journal of Medicine.

10-Feb-2021 7:30 AM EST
Gene-Based Blood Test for Melanoma Spread Evaluates Treatment Progress
NYU Langone Health

A test that monitors blood levels of DNA fragments released by dying tumor cells may serve as an accurate early indicator of treatment success in people in late stages of one of the most aggressive forms of skin cancer, a new study finds.

Newswise: Year or More Delay Between Abnormal, At-Home Screening and Colonoscopy Increases Cancer Risk
Released: 2-Feb-2021 12:45 PM EST
Year or More Delay Between Abnormal, At-Home Screening and Colonoscopy Increases Cancer Risk
University of California San Diego Health

A new study by researchers at University of California San Diego School of Medicine found delayed time between abnormal stool-based screening and subsequent colonoscopy was associated with an increased risk of a cancer diagnosis and death from colorectal cancer.

Newswise: 254111_web.jpg
Released: 21-Jan-2021 11:50 AM EST
Much of Earth's nitrogen was locally sourced
Rice University

Where did Earth's nitrogen come from? Rice University scientists show one primordial source of the indispensable building block for life was close to home.

Newswise: Fans May Relieve Breathlessness Associated with Advanced Cancers
Released: 10-Dec-2020 9:00 AM EST
Fans May Relieve Breathlessness Associated with Advanced Cancers
Johns Hopkins Medicine

Blowing air from a fan into the face of patients with advanced cancer experiencing breathlessness, and other nonpharmacologic interventions, may offer symptom relief, according to new research directed by Johns Hopkins Kimmel Cancer Center investigators. On the other hand, the investigators found medications, such as opioids, had limited impact in improving breathlessness.

Newswise: Cancer cases are rising in adolescents and young adults
30-Nov-2020 10:55 AM EST
Cancer cases are rising in adolescents and young adults
Penn State College of Medicine

Cancer cases in adolescents and young adults have risen by 30% during the last four decades, with kidney cancer rising at the greatest rate, according to researchers at Penn State College of Medicine.

Newswise: Personalized drug screens could guide treatment for children with brain cancer
Released: 12-Nov-2020 8:00 AM EST
Personalized drug screens could guide treatment for children with brain cancer
Sanford Burnham Prebys Medical Discovery Institute

Scientists at Sanford Burnham Prebys Medical Discovery Institute, University of California San Diego School of Medicine and Hopp Children’s Cancer Center Heidelberg (KiTZ) have demonstrated that personalized drug screens can be used to identify new therapeutic candidates for medulloblastoma. The approach measures the effectiveness of therapeutics using tumor cells obtained from a biopsy and can be performed in a few days—making it one of the quickest sources of information used in clinical decision-making.

Newswise:Video Embedded feeling-stressed-or-down-in-a-world-with-covid-try-this-writing-tool
VIDEO
Released: 29-Sep-2020 11:45 AM EDT
Feeling stressed or down in a world with COVID? Try this writing tool
Michigan Medicine - University of Michigan

A new expressive writing tool allows people to put their thoughts and feelings into words to help relieve stress and anxiety. Participants are given a prompt and directed to write for 5-10 minutes, expressing their deepest thoughts and feelings. A computer analyzes keywords and tone to provide feedback.

Newswise: Researchers Show How Mutations in DNA Packaging Machines Cause Cancer
Released: 7-Sep-2020 11:00 AM EDT
Researchers Show How Mutations in DNA Packaging Machines Cause Cancer
UT Southwestern Medical Center

DALLAS – Sept. 7, 2020 – Like wrenches made of Legos, SWI/SNF chromatin remodeling complexes tighten or loosen DNA in our cells to control how genes are turned on and made into proteins. When assembled correctly, these complexes play a crucial role in the development of normal tissues, and when broken, they can lead to the development of cancer. These complexes are commonly disrupted by mutations in the genes that encode them – but how this leads to cancer is poorly understood.

Newswise: Effective Cancer Immunotherapy Further Linked To Regulating A Cell ‘Suicide’ Gene
Released: 1-Sep-2020 1:00 PM EDT
Effective Cancer Immunotherapy Further Linked To Regulating A Cell ‘Suicide’ Gene
Johns Hopkins Medicine

Johns Hopkins Medicine researchers have added to evidence that a gene responsible for turning off a cell’s natural “suicide” signals may also be the culprit in making breast cancer and melanoma cells resistant to therapies that use the immune system to fight cancer. A summary of the research, conducted with mice and human cells, appeared Aug. 25 in Cell Reports.

Newswise: LLNL scientists pair 3D bioprinting and computer modeling to examine cancer spread in blood vessels
25-Aug-2020 7:05 PM EDT
LLNL scientists pair 3D bioprinting and computer modeling to examine cancer spread in blood vessels
Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory scientists have paired 3D-printed, living human brain vasculature with advanced computational flow simulations to better understand tumor cell attachment to blood vessels, the first step in secondary tumor formation during cancer metastasis.

Newswise: Cancer.jpg
Released: 27-Feb-2020 12:20 PM EST
Cancer survival disparities in minority children, adolescents greater for more treatable cancers
Washington University in St. Louis

Racial and ethnic minority children and adolescents with cancer have a higher risk of death than non-Hispanic white children and adolescents, with evidence for larger disparities in survival for more treatable cancers, finds a new study from the Brown School at Washington University in St. Louis.“The results suggest that there are modifiable racial and ethnic disparities in childhood cancer survival,” said Kim Johnson, associate professor and senior author of “Associations Between Race/Ethnicity and US Childhood and Adolescent Cancer Survival by Treatment Amenability,” published Feb.

Released: 22-Jan-2020 9:00 AM EST
Decline in Late Stage Cancer Diagnoses After Health Reform Law
Health Sciences at the University of Pittsburgh

Advanced stage cancer diagnoses declined following health insurance expansion in Massachusetts, likely due to increased access to screening and diagnostic services that identified cancers earlier, according to new research.

22-Nov-2019 6:00 AM EST
Hibernating Mammals Arouse Hope for Genetic Solutions to Obesity, Metabolic Diseases
University of Utah Health

University of Utah Health scientists say they have detected new genetic clues about hibernation that could lead to better understanding and treatment of obesity and metabolic disorders that afflict millions of people worldwide.

Released: 4-Nov-2019 11:05 AM EST
Fluorescent probes offer fuller view of drug delivery in cells
Cornell University

Selecting the most effective molecules for drug delivery is often a trial-and-error process, but Cornell engineers are providing some precision thanks to a technique that reveals the performance of those molecules inside living cells.

Newswise: Using Artificial Intelligence to Predict Risk of Thyroid Cancer on Ultrasound
23-Oct-2019 2:40 PM EDT
Using Artificial Intelligence to Predict Risk of Thyroid Cancer on Ultrasound
Thomas Jefferson University

New study uses machine learning on ultrasound images of thyroid nodules to predict risk of malignancy

Newswise: Creatine powers T cells’ fight against cancer
Released: 18-Oct-2019 12:05 PM EDT
Creatine powers T cells’ fight against cancer
UCLA Eli and Edythe Broad Center of Regenerative Medicine and Stem Cell Research

The study, conducted in mice, is the first to show that creatine uptake is critical to the anti-tumor activities of killer T cells, the foot soldiers of the immune system.

Released: 16-Oct-2019 8:50 AM EDT
Expert Panel: Cancer Treatment Plans Should IncludeTailored Exercise Prescriptions
American College of Sports Medicine (ACSM)

New guidance from exercise oncology experts recommend systematic use of an “exercise prescription” by health care workers and fitness professionals in designing and delivering exercise programs that aim to lower the risk of developing certain cancers and best meet the needs, preferences and abilities of people with cancer. 17 organizations reviewed the latest scientific evidence and offer recommendations about the benefits of exercise for prevention, treatment, recovery and improved survival.

Newswise: Following NCCN Guidelines for Metastatic Breast Cancer Results in Lower Costs for Patients, According to New Study
9-Oct-2019 4:05 PM EDT
Following NCCN Guidelines for Metastatic Breast Cancer Results in Lower Costs for Patients, According to New Study
National Comprehensive Cancer Network® (NCCN®)

Patients pay less out-of-pocket for metastatic breast cancer (MBC) treatment that aligns with recommendations from NCCN Guidelines, according to a new study from the O’Neal Comprehensive Cancer Center at University of Alabama at Birmingham (UAB), published in the October 2019 issue of JNCCN—Journal of the National Comprehensive Cancer Network.

Released: 17-Sep-2019 8:00 AM EDT
First Positive Results in 45 Years: Rhabdomyosarcoma Randomized Clinical Trial Led by Children’s Hospital Los Angeles
Children's Hospital Los Angeles

A randomized clinical trial led at Children's Hospital Los Angeles by Leo Mascarenhas, MD, MS, showed first positive results in rhabdomyosarcoma since 1974.

Newswise: Failed Cancer Drug Looks Promising For Scleroderma And Other Fibrotic Conditions
Released: 12-Sep-2019 9:00 AM EDT
Failed Cancer Drug Looks Promising For Scleroderma And Other Fibrotic Conditions
Johns Hopkins Medicine

Sixteen years ago, a research group at Mayo Medical School published results showing that a protein called TRAIL can kill cells that cause liver fibrosis but no one seemed to follow up on these findings. Now, researchers at Johns Hopkins Medicine have improved on this protein and shown that it selectively kills cells that cause the hardening of skin associated with scleroderma, effectively reversing the condition in mice genetically engineered to mimic the disease. A report on these results was published earlier this year in Nature Communications.

Newswise: 2019 Gynecologic Cancer Survivorship Conference: Thriving Through Education and Connection
Released: 5-Sep-2019 9:00 AM EDT
2019 Gynecologic Cancer Survivorship Conference: Thriving Through Education and Connection
Johns Hopkins Medicine

A premier educational event sponsored by the Johns Hopkins Kelly Gynecologic Oncology Service and the Division of Gynecologic Oncology at Sibley Memorial Hospital, this one-day conference gathers more than 25 experts to provide cancer survivors and their caregivers

Newswise:Video Embedded birmingham-woman-meets-philadelphia-man-who-saved-her-life-through-bone-marrow-donation
VIDEO
Released: 28-Aug-2019 3:05 PM EDT
Birmingham Woman Meets Philadelphia Man Who Saved Her Life Through Bone Marrow Donation
Children's of Alabama

Jada Lucas, a 22-year-old bone marrow recipient from Birmingham, met the bone marrow donor who helped save her life — Jerome Lewis of Philadelphia, Penn. — at donor registry event at Children's of Alabama.

Newswise: Will Disposable Colonoscopy Devices Replace Reusables?
Released: 26-Aug-2019 9:00 AM EDT
Will Disposable Colonoscopy Devices Replace Reusables?
Johns Hopkins Medicine

As a disposable version of the instrument used in one of the most common medical procedures in the United States inches closer to widespread availability, a team of Johns Hopkins data researchers is studying the economic and safety implications associated with the devices used to perform colonoscopies.

16-Aug-2019 11:00 AM EDT
Unprecedented Therapy Found Effective for Blood Cancer Patients With No Treatment Options
Mount Sinai Health System

Mount Sinai researchers have found a new type of therapy to be effective for patients with a particular type of bone marrow cancer that is resistant to several standard therapies, according to results of a clinical trial published in The New England Journal of Medicine in August.

Newswise: Antibiotics Exposure Linked to Increased Colon Cancer Risk
Released: 21-Aug-2019 9:00 AM EDT
Antibiotics Exposure Linked to Increased Colon Cancer Risk
Johns Hopkins Medicine

In an extensive “data mining” analysis of British medical records, researchers at the Johns Hopkins Kimmel Cancer Center conclude that taking even a single course of antibiotics might boost—albeit slightly—the risk of developing colon cancer—but not rectal cancer—a decade later. The findings, reported in the August 20 issue of the journal Gut, highlight the need for judicious use of this broad category of drugs, which are frequently improperly or overprescribed, the report authors say.

Newswise: CWRU School of Nursing Awarded $2.14M National Cancer Institute Grant
Released: 19-Aug-2019 10:00 AM EDT
CWRU School of Nursing Awarded $2.14M National Cancer Institute Grant
Case Western Reserve University

With a $2.14 million grant from the National Cancer Institute (NCI), researchers from the Frances Payne Bolton School of Nursing at Case Western Reserve University will measure whether an approach that uses simulation or experiential learning can affectively teach family caregivers not only the skills to take better care of their patient, but better care of their own emotional and physical health amid such incredible stress.

Newswise: Henry Ford Cancer Institute Enrolls First Patient in World’s Largest Brain Cancer Clinical Trial
Released: 14-Aug-2019 11:05 AM EDT
Henry Ford Cancer Institute Enrolls First Patient in World’s Largest Brain Cancer Clinical Trial
Henry Ford Health System

A next-generation clinical trial program and the first-ever adaptive platform trial for brain cancer, GBM AGILE is a move away from the traditional, one-size-fits-all approach to clinical trials – a major step forward for Precision Medicine.

Newswise: Adding Immunotherapy After Initial Treatment Can Benefit Metastatic Lung Cancer Patients
9-Jul-2019 11:00 AM EDT
Adding Immunotherapy After Initial Treatment Can Benefit Metastatic Lung Cancer Patients
Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania

Treating metastatic non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients with the immunotherapy drug pembrolizumab after they’ve completed locally ablative therapy almost tripled the median progression-free survival compared to the historical average.

Newswise: Immunotherapy drug found safe in treating cancer patients with HIV
Released: 3-Jun-2019 2:05 PM EDT
Immunotherapy drug found safe in treating cancer patients with HIV
Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center

The results of a study led by physicians at Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center showed that patients living with HIV and one of a variety of potentially deadly cancers could be safely treated with the immunotherapy drug pembrolizumab, also known by its brand name, KEYTRUDA®.

Newswise: Mouse Studies Show Minimally Invasive Route Can Accurately Administer Drugs to Brain
29-Apr-2019 9:00 AM EDT
Mouse Studies Show Minimally Invasive Route Can Accurately Administer Drugs to Brain
Johns Hopkins Medicine

In experiments in mice, Johns Hopkins researchers say they have developed a technique that facilitates the precise placement of cancer drugs at their intended targets in the brain. This approach pairs a technique that guides a catheter through the brain’s arteries with positron emission technology (PET) scans to precisely place cancer drugs at their intended targets in the brain. If future studies show this image-guided drug delivery method is safe and effective in humans, the researchers say it could improve outcomes for historically difficult-to-treat and often lethal brain cancers, such as glioblastoma.

Newswise: A Resolution for Good Health
Released: 26-Dec-2018 10:35 AM EST
A Resolution for Good Health
Rutgers Cancer Institute of New Jersey

Rutgers Cancer Institute experts share more about the importance of preventative screenings for colorectal and lung cancers.

Newswise: New research explores policies on timely breast cancer diagnosis for underserved women
Released: 20-Dec-2018 4:05 PM EST
New research explores policies on timely breast cancer diagnosis for underserved women
University of Illinois at Chicago

Delays in diagnosis and use of under-resourced health centers account for most racial and ethnic disparities when it comes to a timely breast cancer diagnosis, according to a new study.

Newswise: Genome offers clues to esophageal cancer disparity
Released: 20-Dec-2018 10:05 AM EST
Genome offers clues to esophageal cancer disparity
Michigan Medicine - University of Michigan

A change in the genome of Caucasians could explain much-higher rates of the most common type of esophageal cancer in this population, a new study finds. It suggests a possible target for prevention strategies, which preliminary work suggests could involve flavonoids derived from cranberries.

Newswise: Novel Biomarker Found in Ovarian Cancer Patients Can Predict Response to Therapy
14-Sep-2018 12:05 PM EDT
Novel Biomarker Found in Ovarian Cancer Patients Can Predict Response to Therapy
University of Chicago Medical Center

Researchers have identified an independent prognostic factor, cancer/testis antigen 45, that is associated with extended disease-free survival for women with advanced ovarian cancer. Patients with high levels of CT45 in their tumors lived more than seven times as long as patients who lacked sufficient CT45.

Newswise: Integrated Analysis Finds Vulnerabilities to Target in a High-Risk Pediatric Tumor
22-Aug-2018 4:05 PM EDT
Integrated Analysis Finds Vulnerabilities to Target in a High-Risk Pediatric Tumor
St. Jude Children's Research Hospital

Research from the St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital—Washington University Pediatric Cancer Genome Project has revealed new vulnerabilities and leads for treatment of rhabdomyosarcoma

Newswise: Like Shark Attack and the Lottery, Unconscious Bias Influences Cancer Screening
Released: 17-Aug-2018 12:15 PM EDT
Like Shark Attack and the Lottery, Unconscious Bias Influences Cancer Screening
University of Colorado Cancer Center

Doctors with personal experience of cancer are more likely to act against established guidelines to recommend that low-risk women receive ovarian cancer screening.

Newswise: Financial Checkup Should Be Part of Health Screenings for Childhood Cancer Survivors
25-Jul-2018 10:35 AM EDT
Financial Checkup Should Be Part of Health Screenings for Childhood Cancer Survivors
St. Jude Children's Research Hospital

Adult survivors of childhood cancer should be screened for financial problems that might cause them to delay or skip medical care or to suffer psychological distress. The recommendation from St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital researchers followed an analysis that found 65 percent of survivors reported financial challenges related to their childhood cancer diagnoses. More than half of survivors (51.1 percent) indicated they worried about paying for care, and 33 percent said finances kept them from seeking medical care.

Newswise: Crystal Structure Reveals How Curcumin Impairs Cancer
Released: 9-Jul-2018 3:35 PM EDT
Crystal Structure Reveals How Curcumin Impairs Cancer
University of California San Diego Health

Through x-ray crystallography and kinase-inhibitor specificity profiling, University of California San Diego School of Medicine researchers, in collaboration with researchers at Peking University and Zhejiang University, reveal that curcumin, a natural occurring chemical compound found in the spice turmeric, binds to the kinase enzyme dual-specificity tyrosine-regulated kinase 2 (DYRK2) at the atomic level. This previously unreported biochemical interaction of curcumin leads to inhibition of DYRK2 that impairs cell proliferation and reduces cancer burden.

Newswise: Light-Based, 15-Second Scan Aims to Replace Painful Mammograms
Released: 21-Jun-2018 2:05 PM EDT
Light-Based, 15-Second Scan Aims to Replace Painful Mammograms
National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering

Up to 50% of women skip potentially life-saving mammograms often because they can cause extreme discomfort. Now researchers have developed a painless, light-based, non-radioactive, 15-second procedure that could revolutionize breast cancer screening and save lives.

Newswise: Improving Survival in Pancreatic Cancer with Platinum-Based Chemotherapy
Released: 17-May-2018 8:00 AM EDT
Improving Survival in Pancreatic Cancer with Platinum-Based Chemotherapy
Johns Hopkins Medicine

A small study of adults with the most common form of pancreatic cancer adds to evidence that patients with BRCA1 or BRCA2 gene mutations long linked to a high risk of breast cancer have poorer overall survival rates than those without the mutations.

1-May-2018 5:00 PM EDT
Study Reveals That Many Oncologists Recommend Medical Marijuana Clinically Despite Not Feeling Sufficiently Knowledgeable to Do So
Dana-Farber Cancer Institute

While a wide majority of oncologists do not feel informed enough about medical marijuana’s utility to make clinical recommendations, most do in fact conduct discussions on medical marijuana in the clinic and nearly half recommend it to their patients, say researchers who surveyed a population-based sample of medical oncologists.

Newswise: New Drug Combo Improves Survival of Women with Rare Uterine Cancer
Released: 10-Apr-2018 10:00 AM EDT
New Drug Combo Improves Survival of Women with Rare Uterine Cancer
Johns Hopkins Medicine

Adding the monoclonal antibody drug trastuzumab—already used to treat certain breast cancers—to the chemotherapy regimen of women with a rare form of uterine cancer lengthens the amount of time their tumors are kept from growing, according to Johns Hopkins Medicine researchers conducting a small phase II trial of the regimen, testing its safety and value.


Showing results

150 of 126

close
1.15923